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Title:  Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2004: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 4416

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CES04I

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

Media: FTP

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Title:  American Housing Survey, 1999: National Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 3204

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ahs99

Year: 1999

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. Unlike previous years, the data are presented in ten separate files (with corresponding SAS datasets): Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Additions to the House), Part 2, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Part 3, Worker Record, Part 4, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Ratio Verification, Part 8, Mover Group Record, Part 9, Recodes (One per Housing Unit), and Part 10, Weights. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title:  Age Discrimination, an Audit Study: 2002-2003 in Boston, Massachusetts, and St. Petersburg, Florida

Source: Lahey, Joanna, Texas A and M University

Owner: ICPSR 23980

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: AgeD

Year: 2002-2003

Status: A

Description: As baby boomers reach retirement age, demographic pressures on public programs may cause policy makers to cut benefits and encourage employment at later ages. But how much demand exists for older workers? This study focuses on a field experiment to determine hiring conditions for women ages 35 to 62 in entry-level or close to entry-level jobs in Boston, Massachusetts and St. Petersburg, Florida. Pairs of computer-randomized resumes were sent to employers in these two cities. Response rates were measured by age, as indicated on each resume by date of high school graduation. Applicants' working history, job choice, certifications, volunteer experience as well as their education and age have been evaluated in this study. Other questions focused on job advertisement and interviewing process.

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Title:  Generational Memory and the Critical Period: Evidence for National and World Events, 1985-2010

Source: Schuman, Howard, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research

Owner: ICPSR 33001

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: GMCP8510

Year: 1985-2010

Status: A

Description: Investigators of this study bring together survey data from sources both new and old in order to test the generational hypothesis that national and world events experienced during a "critical period" of later childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood have a disproportionate effect on memories, attitudes, and actions in later life. Also considered were competing explanations for the same evidence, especially interpretations based on period and recency effects. The data come from nine surveys, mostly national, carried out in the United States and in six other countries (China, Germany, Israel, Japan, Lithuania, and Russia), between 1985 and 2010. The hypothesis is largely supported for recall of past events, and also for commemorative behavior connected to World War II and to the Vietnam War. The evidence is mixed with regard to attitudes toward the Gulf War and the Iraq invasion, emphasizing the distinction between generational effects that result from lifetime experience and those due to a critical period. The analysis considered most of the major events faced by Americans over the past 80 years, ranging from the Great Depression to current issues, including such national traumas as the assassination of President Kennedy, the Vietnam War, and the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack. Comparable events in other countries were also examined.

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Title: 1990 Public Law 94-171 Data

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: PL94171

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: The files contain a count of all persons and all housing units in the geographic area. They also provide a race count (5 race categories) and a count of all persons of Hispanic origin and persons 18 years old and over of Hispanic origin. In addition, data are provided for all persons not of Hispanic origin and persons 18 years old and over not of Hispanic origin by race (5 categories). PL 94-171 files provide data for States and their subareas in hierarchical sequences down to the block level. The hierarchy is shown below: State County Voting district County Subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/block numbering area (or census tract/block numbering area part) Block group (or block group part) Block The PL 94-171 files also have inventories (complete summaries) for the following geographic areas: County subdivision Place Consolidated city State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area In addition to geographic codes, the file also includes area characteristics information such as land area, water area, latitude and longitude.

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Title: 1990 Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS): 1-percent or B Samples

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: PUMSB90

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) contain records representing 5% or 1% samples of the housing units in the U.S. and the persons in them. Selected group quarters persons are also included. The file contains individual weights for each person and housing unit which, when applied to the individual records, expand the sample to the total population. Most population and housing items are listed below. Please see the Data Dictionary for a complete listing of variables and recodes. Both the 5% and 1% samples have the same subject content and vary only in geographic composition of the Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA). Items on the housing record include: Allocation Flags for Housing Items Bedrooms Condominium Status Contract Rent Cost of Utilities Family Income in 1989 Family Subfamily and Relationship Recodes Farm Status and Value Fire, Hazard, Flood Insurance Fuels Used Gross Rent House Heating Fuel Household Income in 1989 Household Type Housing Unit Weight Kitchen Facilities Linguistic Isolation Meals Included in Rent Mortgage Status and Selected Monthly Owner Costs Plumbing Facilities Presence and Age of Own Children Presence of Subfamilies in Household Property Value Real Estate Taxes Rooms Sewage Disposal Source of Water State (Residence) Telephone in Housing Unit Tenure Units in Structure Vacancy Status Vehicles Available Year Householder Moved into Unit Year Structure Built Items on the person record include: Ability to Speak English Age Allocation Flags for Population Items Ancestry Children Ever Born Citizenship Class of Worker Disability Status Educational Attainment Hispanic Origin Hours Worked Income in 1989 by Type Industry Language Spoken at Home Marital Status Means of Transportation Migration PUMA Migration State Military Status, Periods of Active Duty Military Service, Veteran Period of Service Mobility Status Occupation Person's Weight Personal Care Limitation Place of Birth Place of Work PUMA Place of Work State Poverty Status in 1989 Race Relationship School Enrollment and Type of School Weeks Worked in 1989 Work Status in 1989 Time of Departure for Work Work Limitation Status Travel Time to Work Year of Entry Vehicle Occupancy GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE Each PUMS file provides records for States and many of their geographic levels. The 1% sample was based primarily on ropolitan/non-metropolitan areas, and contains PUMAs which were made from whole central cities, whole MSAs or PMSAs, MSA or PMSAs outside the central city, groups of MSAs or PMSAs, and groups of areas outside MSAs or PMSAs. When the areas have more than 200,000 persons, 1% PUMAs can represent parts of central cities, MSA/PMSAs, and so forth. 1% PUMAs may cross State lines and in that case State codes are not shown. The 1% Sample identifies MAs of 100,000 or more inhabitants. The remaining MAs are paired together so that metropolitan and non- metropolitan territory can be separately analyzed. Many large cities, groups of cities, and counties are identified within large MAs. Outside MAs, counties are grouped according to State planning districts or into other reasonable analytic units with populations of 100,000 or more. On the l% sample, when PUMAs cross state boundaries, states are not separately identified. All of these records appear on a separate file where the state is identified as "99". Public-use microdata samples are computer accessible files which contain records for a sample of housing units, with information on the characteristics of each unit and the people in it. We exclude information which would identify a household or an individual in order to protect the confidentiality of respondents. Within the limits of the sample size and geographic detail, these files allow users to prepare virtually any tabulations they require.

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Title: 1990 Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS): 5-percent or A Samples

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: PUMSA90

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) contain records representing 5% or 1% samples of the housing units in the U.S. and the persons in them. Selected group quarters persons are also included. The file contains individual weights for each person and housing unit which, when applied to the individual records, expand the sample to the total population. Most population and housing items are listed below. Please see the Data Dictionary for a complete listing of variables and recodes. Both the 5% and 1% samples have the same subject content and vary only in geographic composition of the Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA). Items on the housing record include: Allocation Flags for Housing Items Bedrooms Condominium Status Contract Rent Cost of Utilities Family Income in 1989 Family Subfamily and Relationship Recodes Farm Status and Value Fire, Hazard, Flood Insurance Fuels Used Gross Rent House Heating Fuel Household Income in 1989 Household Type Housing Unit Weight Kitchen Facilities Linguistic Isolation Meals Included in Rent Mortgage Status and Selected Monthly Owner Costs Plumbing Facilities Presence and Age of Own Children Presence of Subfamilies in Household Property Value Real Estate Taxes Rooms Sewage Disposal Source of Water State (Residence) Telephone in Housing Unit Tenure Units in Structure Vacancy Status Vehicles Available Year Householder Moved into Unit Year Structure Built Items on the person record include: Ability to Speak English Age Allocation Flags for Population Items Ancestry Children Ever Born Citizenship Class of Worker Disability Status Educational Attainment Hispanic Origin Hours Worked Income in 1989 by Type Industry Language Spoken at Home Marital Status Means of Transportation Migration PUMA Migration State Military Status, Periods of Active Duty Military Service, Veteran Period of Service Mobility Status Occupation Person's Weight Personal Care Limitation Place of Birth Place of Work PUMA Place of Work State Poverty Status in 1989 Race Relationship School Enrollment and Type of School Weeks Worked in 1989 Work Status in 1989 Time of Departure for Work Work Limitation Status Travel Time to Work Year of Entry Vehicle Occupancy GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE Each PUMS file provides records for States and many of their geographic levels. The 5% sample identifies every State and various subdivisions of States called "Public Use Microdata Areas", each with at least 100,000 persons. These PUMAs were primarily based on counties, and may be whole counties, groups of counties, and places. When these entities have more than 200,000 persons, PUMAs can represent parts of counties, places, etc. None of these PUMAs on the 5% sample crosses state lines. Areas with populations under 100,000 have been grouped into reasonable analytic units often equivalent to State planning district boundaries. In New England, areas are defined in terms of cities and towns rather than counties. Public-use microdata samples are computer accessible files which contain records for a sample of housing units, with information on the characteristics of each unit and the people in it. We exclude information which would identify a household or an individual in order to protect the confidentiality of respondents. Within the limits of the sample size and geographic detail, these files allow users to prepare virtually any tabulations they require.

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Title: 1990 TIGER/Line

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990TGR

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: TIGER, an automated geographic data base, stands for Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing System. It allows the production of various geographic products to support the 1990 census. It provides coordinate-based digital map information for the entire United States, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the Pacific territories over which the United States has jurisdiction. The TIGER System will significantly improve 1990 census maps and geographic reference products and will permit users to generate, by computer, maps at different scales for any geographic area of the country. The Census Bureau expects that extracts from the TIGER System will be released in several formats. One extract of selected geographic and cartographic information is called the TIGER/Line files. TIGER/Line files contain basic data for the segments of each boundary or feature (e.g., roads, railroads, and rivers), including adjacent census geographic area codes, latitude, longitude coordinates of segment end points, the name and type of the feature, and the relevant census feature class code identifying the feature segment by category. TIGER/Line files also furnish address ranges and associated ZIP Codes for each side of street segments for areas approximating the urbanized areas. The TIGER/Line files are organized by county and are available to the public now in a precensus version and later in a final 1990 census version. The files are released on computer tape and CD-ROM. 1990 Census TIGER/Line Files Selected geographic and cartographic information from the TIGER data base has been released in the form of the TIGER/Line(TM) files‹available by county. These files cover the entire United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and Palau, as well as two Pacific territories over which the United States had jurisdiction at the time of the 1980 census‹the Federated States of Micronesia and the Marshall Islands. Each 1990 Census TIGER/Line(TM) file contains digital information for all 1990 census map features as well as the 1990 census geographic area codes, including census tracts/BNA's, block numbers, and governmental unit boundaries as of January 1, 1990. The files contain the same geographic area codes as the 10 census data products, including census designated places, voting districts, and the 101st Congressional districts. The TIGER/Line(TM) files are separated into 12 record types that contain latitude and longitude coordinates for the end points of each Line segment; coordinate points that describe the shape of each Line segment that is not a straight Line; Census Bureau and, where available, Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) codes for Al/ANA, State, county, county subdivision, place, census tract/BNA, block, voting district, and congressional district; a feature names list; an index to alternate feature names; and, where available, address ranges and their ZIP Codes for the right and left sides of each street segment. Additional record types include landmark names, coordinates, and polygon identifiers. The geographic and cartographic information in the TIGER/Line(TM) files can be combined with statistical information, such as 1990 census data about population, housing, or income, or any other type of data, using mainframe or personal computers. With the proper software, the TIGER/Line(TM) files enable users to create a map of any area they need and to analyze information about that area. Computer mapping is an invaluable tool for interpreting data. Its uses include legislative redistricting, thematic mapping, and geographic information systems applications. State and local governments have used the TlGER/Line(TM) files to generate maps for resource allocations, site analysis, and emergency vehicle routing. Businesses such as utility companies, banks, insurance companies, oil companies, and delivery companies have used such maps to analyze markets and draw new service area boundaries. Network analysis allows users to determine the ideal route between two points‹whether it be the fastest (directing emergency vehicles) or the safest (movement of hazardous materials). Geocoding allows users with local address files to relate addresses to particular geographic areas. By adding a geographic code, such as a census tract number, to data records with addresses, the data can be tabulated or displayed on a map and compared to other information, such as census data, reported for the same geographic level. For the 1990 Census TIGER/Line files, two new record types are added: A: Additional Polygon Geographic Area Codes R: Record Number Range Four record types are added to the Initial Voting District Codes TIGER/Line Files: 7: Landmark Features 8: Area Landmarks I: Area Boundaries P: Polygon Location

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF1A

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF1A

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Description: Summary Tape File l (STF 1) contains 1OO-percent data. Population items include age, race, sex, marital status, Hispanic origin, household type, and household relationship. Population items are cross tabulated by age, race, Hispanic origin, or sex. Housing items include occupancy/vacancy status, tenure, units in structure, contract rent, meals included in rent, value, and number of rooms in housing unit. Housing data are cross tabulated by race or Hispanic origin of householder or by tenure. Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 37 population tables (matrices) and 63 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 1 is released as file 1A, file lB, file lC, and file 1D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 1A provides data for States and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block group level. This hierarchy is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) (or census tract/BNA part) Block group (or block group part) State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area File 1A also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas: Place Census tract/BNA Block group Congressional District (101st Congress) Consolidated cities

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF1B

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF1B

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Description: Summary Tape File l (STF 1) contains 1OO-percent data. Population items include age, race, sex, marital status, Hispanic origin, household type, and household relationship. Population items are cross tabulated by age, race, Hispanic origin, or sex. Housing items include occupancy/vacancy status, tenure, units in structure, contract rent, meals included in rent, value, and number of rooms in housing unit. Housing data are cross tabulated by race or Hispanic origin of householder or by tenure. Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 37 population tables (matrices) and 63 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 1 is released as file 1A, file lB, file lC, and file 1D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 1B provides data for the lowest level of census geography, census blocks. The hierarchy for the file is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/BNA (or census track/BNA part) Block group (or block group part) Block State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area File lB also has inventory or complete summaries for the following geographic areas: Place Census tract/BNA Block group Consolidated city Alaska Native Regional Corporation State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area/Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA /CMSA) State portion of Urbanized Area (UA)

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF1B

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF1B

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File l (STF 1) contains 1OO-percent data. Population items include age, race, sex, marital status, Hispanic origin, household type, and household relationship. Population items are cross tabulated by age, race, Hispanic origin, or sex. Housing items include occupancy/vacancy status, tenure, units in structure, contract rent, meals included in rent, value, and number of rooms in housing unit. Housing data are cross tabulated by race or Hispanic origin of householder or by tenure. Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 37 population tables (matrices) and 63 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 1 is released as file 1A, file lB, file lC, and file 1D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 1B provides data for the lowest level of census geography, census blocks. The hierarchy for the file is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/BNA (or census track/BNA part) Block group (or block group part) Block State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area File lB also has inventory or complete summaries for the following geographic areas: Place Census tract/BNA Block group Consolidated city Alaska Native Regional Corporation State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area/Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA /CMSA) State portion of Urbanized Area (UA)

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF1C

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF1C

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File l (STF 1) contains 1OO-percent data. Population items include age, race, sex, marital status, Hispanic origin, household type, and household relationship. Population items are cross tabulated by age, race, Hispanic origin, or sex. Housing items include occupancy/vacancy status, tenure, units in structure, contract rent, meals included in rent, value, and number of rooms in housing unit. Housing data are cross tabulated by race or Hispanic origin of householder or by tenure. Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 37 population tables (matrices) and 63 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 1 is released as file 1A, file lB, file lC, and file 1D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 1C provides summaries for the entire United States. The file structure is as follows: United States Region Division State County County subdivision (12 States, population restricted) Places of 100,000 or more persons Consolidated city Metropolitan Statistical Area/Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA/CMSA) Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area Urbanized Area (UA) Total, State and county portion of American Indian reservations (with trust lands and with no trust lands) and Alaska Native Areas Inventory summaries are provided for the geographic area listed below: Alaska Native Regional Corporation

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF1D

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF1D

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File l (STF 1) contains 1OO-percent data. Population items include age, race, sex, marital status, Hispanic origin, household type, and household relationship. Population items are cross tabulated by age, race, Hispanic origin, or sex. Housing items include occupancy/vacancy status, tenure, units in structure, contract rent, meals included in rent, value, and number of rooms in housing unit. Housing data are cross tabulated by race or Hispanic origin of householder or by tenure. Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 37 population tables (matrices) and 63 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 1 is released as file 1A, file lB, file lC, and file 1D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists most frequently accessed geographic levels. File 1D is the first STF released that provides data for the Congressional Districts of the 103rd Congress. The hierarchy for STF 1D is shown below: State Congressional District (103rd Congress) County (or county part) County subdivision (or county subdivision part) (with 10,000 or more persons) (12 States only) Place (or place part) (10,000 or more persons) Consolidated city (or consolidated city part) (10,000 or more persons) American Indian Reservation (with trust lands and with no trust lands)/Alaska Native Area and Alaska Native Regional Corporation (or American Indian Reservation /Alaska Native Area and Alaska Native Regional Corporation part)

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF2A

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF2A

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 2 (STF 2) contains 100-percent There are both A and B records. A records, which contain all tables (matrices) with a table (matrix) number beginning with PA or HA, are provided for each summary level in a geographic area, then repeated for each geographic component. B records, which have a table (matrix) number beginning with PB or HB, are repeated for each geographic component as well as each characteristic iteration. Population items in the A record include counts of persons by race (37 categories), American Indian tribes (29 categories), Hispanic origin (5 categories along with a separate table with two categories cross tabulated by race), and group quarters (45 categories along with a separate table with 13 categories cross tabulated by age). Record A housing counts include race of householder (37 categories with a separate table of all 37 categories tabulated by Hispanic origin); tenure by persons in unit, household type, and age of householder (49 categories); tenure by number of non-relatives and by number of persons in unit; vacancy status by boarded-up status and duration of vacancy; and price or rent asked for vacant-for-sale-only or vacant-for-rent units. Population counts in the B record include persons; families; households; sex; sex by age (103 categories); sex by marital status by age; sex by group quarters (32 categories); household size and relationship; household size and household type; and household type and relationship tabulated for all persons, persons under 6 years, under 18 years, and 60 years and over as well as tabulated by sex and age. Housing unit counts in the B record include counts of occupied housing units by tenure and tenure tabulated by persons in unit, rooms, persons per room, units in structure, and age of householder. Value is provided for specified owner-occupied housing units and owner-occupied mobile homes. Contract rent is shown for specified renter-occupied housing units. The A record in STF 2A, 2B, and 2C files provides a single record for each summary level/geographic component combination within a unit of geography. The B record in STF 2A repeats the tables for each summary level/geographic component combination for ten categories of race and Hispanic origin: all persons; White; Black; American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut; Asian or Pacific Islander; other race; Hispanic origin (of any race); White, not of Hispanic origin; Black, not of Hispanic origin; and other races, not of Hispanic origin. The B record in STF 2B and 2C repeats tables for each summary vel/geographic component combination for 34 categories of race and Hispanic origin: each of the categories listed above as well as more detailed categories for American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut; Asian and Pacific Islander; Hispanic original and not of Hispanic origin. Summary Tape File 2 is released in three files: 2A, 2B, and 2C. The record layout is identical for all three files, but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists the most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 2A provides data for each State; the State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area/Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA/CMSA) or Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA) and the non-metropolitan remainder of the State; counties; places with 10,000 or more persons; consolidated cities; and census tract/block numbering areas.

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF2B

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF2B

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 2 (STF 2) contains 100-percent There are both A and B records. A records, which contain all tables (matrices) with a table (matrix) number beginning with PA or HA, are provided for each summary level in a geographic area, then repeated for each geographic component. B records, which have a table (matrix) number beginning with PB or HB, are repeated for each geographic component as well as each characteristic iteration. Population items in the A record include counts of persons by race (37 categories), American Indian tribes (29 categories), Hispanic origin (5 categories along with a separate table with two categories cross tabulated by race), and group quarters (45 categories along with a separate table with 13 categories cross tabulated by age). Record A housing counts include race of householder (37 categories with a separate table of all 37 categories tabulated by Hispanic origin); tenure by persons in unit, household type, and age of householder (49 categories); tenure by number of nonrelatives and by number of persons in unit; vacancy status by boarded-up status and duration of vacancy; and price or rent asked for vacant-for-sale-only or vacant-for-rent units. Population counts in the B record include persons; families; households; sex; sex by age (103 categories); sex by marital status by age; sex by group quarters (32 categories); household size and relationship; household size and household type; and household type and relationship tabulated for all persons, persons under 6 years, under 18 years, and 60 years and over as well as tabulated by sex and age. Housing unit counts in the B record include counts of occupied housing units by tenure and tenure tabulated by persons in unit, rooms, persons per room, units in structure, and age of householder. Value is provided for specified owner-occupied housing units and owner-occupied mobile homes. Contract rent is shown for specified renter-occupied housing units. The A record in STF 2A, 2B, and 2C files provides a single record for each summary level/geographic component combination within a unit of geography. The B record in STF 2A repeats the tables for each summary level/geographic component combination for ten categories of race and Hispanic origin: all persons; White; Black; American Indian, Eskimo, or Aleut; Asian or Pacific Islander; other race; Hispanic origin (of any race); White, not of Hispanic origin; Black, not of Hispanic origin; and other races, not of Hispanic origin. The B record in STF 2B and 2C repeats tables for each summary el/geographic component combination for 34 categories of race and Hispanic origin: each of the categories listed above as well as more detailed categories for American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut; Asian and Pacific Islander; Hispanic original and not of Hispanic origin. Summary Tape File 2 is released in three files‹2A, 2B, and 2C. The record layout is identical for all three files, but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists the most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 2B provides data for each State, counties, county subdivisions, county subdivisions with 1,000 or more persons (in 12 States), county subdivisions with fewer than 1,000 persons and in an MSA/CMSA (New England States only), places with 1,000 or more persons, State and county portion of American Indian reservations with and without trust lands, and Alaska Native Regional Corporations.

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF3A

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF3A

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 3 (STF 3) contains sample data weighted to represent the total population. In addition, the file contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units. Population items include: Age Ancestry Citizenship Class of worker Educational attainment Employment status Family type Farm and nonfarm population Foreign-born status Group quarters Hispanic origin Household type and relationship Income in 1989 Industry Language spoken at home Marital status Means of transportation to work Mobility limitation status Occupation Place of birth Place of work Poverty status in 1989 Private vehicle occupancy Race Residence in 1985 School enrollment Self-care limitation status Sex Travel time to work Urban and rural population Veteran/military status Work disability status Work status in 1989 Workers in family in 1989 Housing items include: Age of householder Bedrooms Condominium status Farm and nonfarm housing Heating fuel Hispanic origin of householder Housing units Kitchen facilities Meals included in rent Mortgage status Occupancy status Plumbing facilities Race of householder Rent Rooms Selected monthly owner costs Sewage disposal Telephone availability Tenure Units in structure Urban and rural housing Utilities in rent Value of housing unit Vehicles available Water source Year householder moved into unit Year structure built Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 178 population tables (matrices) and 99 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 3 is released as file 3A, file 3B file 3C, and file 3D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists only the most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 3A provides data for States and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block group level. This hierarchy is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) (or part) Block group (or part) State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area Alaska Native Regional Corporation State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) /Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA)/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA)Stale portion of urbanized areas (UA) File 3A also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas: Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) Block group Place Consolidated city

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF3A

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF3A

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 3 (STF 3) contains sample data weighted to represent the total population. In addition, the file contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units. Population items include: Age Ancestry Citizenship Class of worker Educational attainment Employment status Family type Farm and nonfarm population Foreign-born status Group quarters Hispanic origin Household type and relationship Income in 1989 Industry Language spoken at home Marital status Means of transportation to work Mobility limitation status Occupation Place of birth Place of work Poverty status in 1989 Private vehicle occupancy Race Residence in 1985 School enrollment Self-care limitation status Sex Travel time to work Urban and rural population Veteran/military status Work disability status Work status in 1989 Workers in family in 1989 Housing items include: Age of householder Bedrooms Condominium status Farm and nonfarm housing Heating fuel Hispanic origin of householder Housing units Kitchen facilities Meals included in rent Mortgage status Occupancy status Plumbing facilities Race of householder Rent Rooms Selected monthly owner costs Sewage disposal Telephone availability Tenure Units in structure Urban and rural housing Utilities in rent Value of housing unit Vehicles available Water source Year householder moved into unit Year structure built Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 178 population tables (matrices) and 99 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 3 is released as file 3A, file 3B file 3C, and file 3D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists only the most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 3A provides data for States and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block group level. This hierarchy is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) (or part) Block group (or part) State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area Alaska Native Regional Corporation State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) /Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA)/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA)Stale portion of urbanized areas (UA) File 3A also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas: Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) Block group Place Consolidated city

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF3B

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF3B

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 3 (STF 3) contains sample data weighted to represent the total population. In addition, the file contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units. Population items include: Age Ancestry Citizenship Class of worker Educational attainment Employment status Family type Farm and nonfarm population Foreign-born status Group quarters Hispanic origin Household type and relationship Income in 1989 Industry Language spoken at home Marital status Means of transportation to work Mobility limitation status Occupation Place of birth Place of work Poverty status in 1989 Private vehicle occupancy Race Residence in 1985 School enrollment Self-care limitation status Sex Travel time to work Urban and rural population Veteran/military status Work disability status Work status in 1989 Workers in family in 1989 Housing items include: Age of householder Bedrooms Condominium status Farm and nonfarm housing Heating fuel Hispanic origin of householder Housing units Kitchen facilities Meals included in rent Mortgage status Occupancy status Plumbing facilities Race of householder Rent Rooms Selected monthly owner costs Sewage disposal Telephone availability Tenure Units in structure Urban and rural housing Utilities in rent Value of housing unit Vehicles available Water source Year householder moved into unit Year structure built Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 178 population tables (matrices) and 99 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 3 is released as file 3A, file 3B file 3C, and file 3D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists only the most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 3A provides data for States and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block group level. This hierarchy is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) (or part) Block group (or part) State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area Alaska Native Regional Corporation State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) /Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA)/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA)Stale portion of urbanized areas (UA) File 3A also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas: Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) Block group Place Consolidated city

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Title: 1990 US Census of Population and Housing, STF3C

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: US Census Bureau

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: 1990STF3C

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 3 (STF 3) contains sample data weighted to represent the total population. In addition, the file contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units. Population items include: Age Ancestry Citizenship Class of worker Educational attainment Employment status Family type Farm and nonfarm population Foreign-born status Group quarters Hispanic origin Household type and relationship Income in 1989 Industry Language spoken at home Marital status Means of transportation to work Mobility limitation status Occupation Place of birth Place of work Poverty status in 1989 Private vehicle occupancy Race Residence in 1985 School enrollment Self-care limitation status Sex Travel time to work Urban and rural population Veteran/military status Work disability status Work status in 1989 Workers in family in 1989 Housing items include: Age of householder Bedrooms Condominium status Farm and nonfarm housing Heating fuel Hispanic origin of householder Housing units Kitchen facilities Meals included in rent Mortgage status Occupancy status Plumbing facilities Race of householder Rent Rooms Selected monthly owner costs Sewage disposal Telephone availability Tenure Units in structure Urban and rural housing Utilities in rent Value of housing unit Vehicles available Water source Year householder moved into unit Year structure built Selected aggregates and medians also are provided. Data are presented in 178 population tables (matrices) and 99 housing tables (matrices). Summary Tape File 3 is released as file 3A, file 3B file 3C, and file 3D. The record layout is identical for all four files but the geographic coverage differs. This abstract lists only the most frequently accessed geographic levels. STF 3A provides data for States and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block group level. This hierarchy is shown below: State County County subdivision Place (or place part) Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) (or part) Block group (or part) State portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area (with trust lands and with no trust lands) County portion of American Indian and Alaska Native area Alaska Native Regional Corporation State portion of Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) /Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (CMSA)/Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area (PMSA)Stale portion of urbanized areas (UA) File 3A also has inventory (complete) summaries for the following geographic areas: Census tract/block numbering area (BNA) Block group Place Consolidated city

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Title: 1998 Washington State Population Survey (SPS)

Source: The Social and Economic Sciences Research Center, Washington State University

Owner: Washington State Office of Financial Man

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: WSPS98

Year: 1998

Status: A

Description: The SPS was designed to provide a profile of Washington residents between decennial censuses. It collected data on topics such as employment, work experience, income, education, in-migration, health, health insurance, commute pattern, computer ownership, and internet usage, in addition to basic demographics. The population for this survey consists of all households located within the geographic boundaries of Washington State. Because this was a telephone survey, only the households with telephones were potential subjects. However, the 1990 census shows that less than 4 percent of Washington households did not have telephones. Households on military compounds and other group quarters (such as student dormitories, prisons, and nursing homes) were also excluded from this survey. Since there is no universal list of all the households as defined above from which a random sample can be obtained, SESRC used the random digit dialing (RDD) approach to obtain the required sample. The RDD approach is most commonly used to ensure equal probability of selection for each household with an activated telephone line, listed or not. The RDD sampling frame SESRC used was prepared by the Genesys Sampling Company.

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Title: 2000 Washington State Population Survey

Source: Washington State Data Center, Office of Financial Management

Owner: CSSCR

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: WSPS2000

Year: 2000

Status:  

Description: The 2000 Washington State Population Survey (SPS) is the second in a series of surveys designed to provide, biennially, a detailed profile of Washington State residents. The survey provides information on topics such as employment, income, education, immigration, health, and health insurance, and borrows its structure and many of its questions from the national Current Population Survey (CPS). The original survey was constructed in 1998, and minor changes were made for the 2000 survey. The SPS is a valuable component to other reports and data resources addressing Washington's population. For example, although the federal Census was also conducted in 2000, the SPS provides a consistent source of information at more frequent intervals than the decennial Census. Also, the March CPS measures income statewide on a year-to-year basis, but has a much smaller sample size and does not provide the regional income data found in the SPS. Results for both surveys are available for Washington State and, for some items, for eight regions within Washington. The regions, all either single counties or groups of counties, are shown below. The sample design supports the regional data. No data are available for smaller/other areas. More detailed information is available at http://www.ofm.wa.gov/sps/2000/index.htm. DATE ADDED: 09-08-2001.

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Title: 2002 Washington State Population Survey

Source: Washington State Data Center, Office of Financial Management

Owner: CSSCR, University of Washington

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: WSPS2002

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The Washington State Population Survey has been an important source of information about the health and welfare of Washington families for the last four years. The survey, which will be conducted this year (spring 2002) for the third time, focuses primarily on issues of employment, family poverty, in-migration, health, and health insurance coverage. The 2002 survey data will be of particular importance as state policymakers work to improve the economic conditions in the state. The Office of Financial Management (OFM) designed the original survey with consultation from a legislative staff advisory group and an extended network of more than 80 local governments, and higher education institutions. Gilmore Research Group, a private, independent research company in Seattle, is administering the 2002 survey. Results from both previous surveys are available for Washington State and, for some items, for eight regions within Washington. The regions, either single counties or groups of counties, are shown below. The sample design supports the regional data. No data are available for smaller/or other areas. More detailed information is available at http://www.ofm.wa.gov/sps/2002/index.htm. DATE ADDED: 01-27-2006

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Title: 2004 Washington State Population Survey

Source: Washington State Data Center, Office of Financial Management

Owner: CSSCR

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: WSPS2004

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: The Washington State Population Survey has been an important source of information about the health and welfare of Washington families for the last six years. The survey, which was conducted in spring 2004 for the fourth time, focuses primarily on issues of employment, family poverty, in-migration, health, and health insurance coverage. The 2004 survey data will be of particular importance as state policymakers work to improve the economic conditions in the state. The Office of Financial Management (OFM) designed the original survey with consultation from a legislative staff advisory group and an extended network of more than 80 local governments, and higher education institutions. Gilmore Research Group, a private, independent research company in Seattle, is administering the 2004 survey. Results from previous surveys are available for Washington State and, for some items, for eight regions within Washington. The regions, either single counties or groups of counties, are shown below. The sample design supports the regional data. No data are available for smaller/or other areas. More detailed information is available at http://www.ofm.wa.gov/sps/2004/index.htm. DATE ADDED: 01-27-2006.

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Title: 2006 Washington State Population Survey

Source: Washington State Data Center, Office of Financial Management

Owner: CSSCR

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: WSPS2006

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The Washington State Population Survey has been an important source of information about the health and welfare of Washington families for the last six years. The survey, which was conducted in spring 2006 for the fifth time, focuses primarily on issues of employment, family poverty, in-migration, health, and health insurance coverage. The 2004 survey data will be of particular importance as state policymakers work to improve the economic conditions in the state. The Office of Financial Management (OFM) designed the original survey with consultation from a legislative staff advisory group and an extended network of more than 80 local governments, and higher education institutions. Gilmore Research Group, a private, independent research company in Seattle, is administering the 2004 survey. Results from previous surveys are available for Washington State and, for some items, for eight regions within Washington. The regions, either single counties or groups of counties, are shown below. The sample design supports the regional data. No data are available for smaller/or other areas. More detailed information is available at http://www.ofm.wa.gov/sps/2006/default.asp.

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Title: 2012 President General Election Results Data

Source: Dave Liep's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections

Owner: CSSCR

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: PresElec2012

Year: 2012

Status: A

Description: There are three CSV files: a state level only vote data file, a county level only vote data file and a full vote data file. The full vote data file contains the following worksheets: • Vote Data by State - summarizes vote totals by state for each candidate - with boundary file information (fips); • Vote Data by County - vote data for all counties of all states plus DC - with boundary file information (fips); • Vote Data by Town - vote data for New England towns (ME, MA, CT, RI, VT, NH) - with boundary file information (fips); • Graphs - pie charts for each state and national total; • Party - data sorted by strength at the state level for the major parties; • Statistics - page of statistics includes closest states, max, min, counties, etc; • Ballots - ballot listing information • Candidates - candidate names and party ballot listing per state; • Data Sources - a list of data sources used to compile the spreadsheet. Data sets were purchased from Dave Leip’s Altas of U.S. Presidential Elections (http://uselectionatlas.org/)

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Title: 2012 Voter Registration & Turnout Data by County

Source: Dave Liep's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections

Owner: CSSCR

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: registration12

Year: 2012

Status: A

Description: The spreadsheets are in Microsoft Excel format (Mac/PC) and are compatible with the 1997 - 2004 versions. The following worksheets are included in the file: National Summary - summarizes registration and turnout totals by state - with boundary file information (fips); Data by County - data for all counties of all states plus DC - with boundary file information (fips); Data by Town - data for New England towns (ME, MA, CT, RI, VT, NH) - with boundary file information (fips); Data Sources - a list of data sources used to compile the spreadsheet. And, each level of data include the following: Total Population (state and county); Total Voting-Age Population (state only); Total Voter Registration (except ND, WI - these two states do not have voter registration.); Total Ballots Cast (for 2004, not yet available for NC, PA. WI doesn't publish this data); Total Vote Cast for President Voter Registration by Party (AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DE, DC, FL, IA, KS, KY, LA, MA, ME, MD, NE, NV, NH, NJ, NM, NY, NC, OK, OR, PA, SD, WV, WY). Remaining states do not have voter registration by party).

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Title: 2016 President General Election Results Data

Source: Dave Liep's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections

Owner: CSSCR

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: PresElec2016

Year: 2016

Status: A

Description: There are three CSV files: a state level only vote data file, a county level only vote data file and a full vote data file. The full vote data file contains the following worksheets: • Vote Data by State - summarizes vote totals by state for each candidate - with boundary file information (fips); • Vote Data by County - vote data for all counties of all states plus DC - with boundary file information (fips); • Vote Data by Town - vote data for New England towns (ME, MA, CT, RI, VT, NH) - with boundary file information (fips); • Graphs - pie charts for each state and national total; • Party - data sorted by strength at the state level for the major parties; • Statistics - page of statistics includes closest states, max, min, counties, etc; • Ballots - ballot listing information • Candidates - candidate names and party ballot listing per state; • Data Sources - a list of data sources used to compile the spreadsheet. Data sets were purchased from Dave Leip’s Altas of U.S. Presidential Elections (http://uselectionatlas.org/)

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Title: ABC News 9/11 Anniversary Poll, September 2006

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4665

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABC911AP_Sep06

Year: September 2006

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted September 5-7, 2006, is a part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of political and social issues. The focus of this poll was the fifth anniversary of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as the campaign against terrorism and the situation in Iraq. Information was collected on how closely respondents were following the upcoming congressional and gubernatorial election, whether they would vote for a Democratic or Republican candidate if the election for the United States House of Representatives were being held that day, and the single most important issue in their vote for Congress members. Other questions asked which political party they trusted to do a better job handling the main problems the nation would face over the next few years, and whether they approved of the way Congress and their own representative to the United States House of Representatives were handling their jobs. Views were also sought on the war in Iraq and Donald Rumsfield's handling of his job as Secretary of Defense. Respondents were asked how well they thought the campaign against terrorism was going, whether the country was safer from terrorism compared to before September 11, 2001, and whether Osama bin Laden would have to be captured or killed for the war on terrorism to be a success. Information was collected about the impact of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on respondents' lives, how concerned they were about the possibility of more major terrorist attacks in the United States, how much confidence they had in the government's ability to prevent another major terrorist attack, whether the federal government was intruding on the privacy rights of Americans in its investigation of possible terrorist attacks, and whether this intrusion was justified. Additional topics addressed the religion of Islam, new airport security measures, and how proud they felt to be an American. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, household income, voter registration and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, employment status, marital status, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

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Title: ABC News Bradley/Bush/Gore Express Poll, June 1999

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 2776

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABC99_jun

Year: 1999

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, fielded June 9-13, 1999, sought respondents' views on the upcoming 2000 presidential election. Those queried were asked for whom they would vote given the choice between Democratic candidate Vice President Al Gore and Republican candidate Texas Governor George W. Bush, and how strongly they felt about their current choice. Respondents were also asked whether they believed that Gore understood the problems of people like them, was boring, or was a strong leader. An additional question concerned the Democratic primary or caucus for president in 2000. Given a choice between Gore and former New Jersey Senator Bill Bradley, respondents were asked for their vote choice. Background information on respondents includes age, race, sex, political party, education, marital status, employment status, age of members of household, and income.;

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Ncases: 1,045


Title: ABC News Nukes Poll, August 2005

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 4516

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABCNP_Aug05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, undertaken August 18-21, 2005, queried respondents on their opinions about the possibilities of a terrorist attack. Respondents were asked if they felt the country was safer today than before September 11, 2001, if the United States was doing all it could to prevent another terrorist attack, how concerned they were about the possibility of another attack and if they might personally become a victim. The survey sought information on how prepared respondents felt for an attack, if they had emergency supplies on hand, and if they had an emergency plan in place. Respondents were also asked how they felt people would react to various types of attacks, how they would react to a nuclear bomb, if they felt nuclear and radiological materials were being protected, and how prepared they thought the government, law enforcement, and hospitals were for an attack. The survey also contained questions regarding respondents' driving habits, what type of vehicle they drove, their opinions of gas prices, whether or not their driving habits were being affected by the gas prices, and their opinions on the impact of gas prices on the national economy. Demographic information included party affiliation, political ideology, education, age, number of children under 18, type of residential area, race, income, and sex.

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Title: ABC News Sarah Palin Poll, September 2008

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 27323

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABCsppSep08

Year: September 2008

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll sought respondents' views on Sarah Palin. Respondents where asked for their impressions of Sarah Palin and Joe Biden. They were also asked if they approved or disapproved of John McCain's choice of Palin as his running mate, if McCain's selection of Palin as his running mate made the respondent more or less likely to vote for him, and if having Palin as his running mate made the respondent more or less confident in the choices McCain would make as president. Respondents were queried on whether they thought both Palin and Biden have the kind of experience it takes to serve effectively as president if necessary. Opinions were sought on how recent events in Palin's life and her stance on issues affected the respondent's opinion of her such as giving birth to her fifth child after learning he had Down Syndrome, her 17-year-old daughter keeping her baby and marrying the father, obtaining 27 million dollars in federal funding for projects as mayor in her town of about 7,000 people, opposing legal abortion unless the mother's life is in direct danger, and opposing stricter controls on handgun ownership. Those queried were also asked if, given what they heard about her family situation, they thought Palin made the right choice in agreeing to run for vice president and whether news coverage of Palin has been fair or unfair. Their opinion was also sought on whether they thought Barack Obama's selection of Biden for vice president made them more or less likely to vote for him. Demographic information includes age, race, sex, party affiliation, voter registration status, political ideology, religious affiliation, and whether the respondent is a born-again Christian.

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Title: ABC News/The Washington Post Gun Poll, April 2007

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 24587

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABCWPgpApr07

Year: April 2007

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, fielded April 22, 2007, is a part of continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on various political and social issues. This poll focused on respondents' views on gun control and laws. Respondents were asked whether they favored stricter gun laws, whether they would support laws requiring a nationwide ban on semiautomatic handguns, a nationwide ban on the sale of assault weapons, a nationwide ban on people carrying a concealed weapon, and a law requiring a nationwide ban on the sale of handguns, except to law enforcement officers. Respondents were also asked whether they thought stricter gun control laws would reduce the amount of violent crime, whether the best way of reducing gun violence was either by passing stricter gun control laws or by stricter enforcement of existing laws, if the respondent or anyone in their home owned a gun, and whether they thought states should or should not be required to report mentally ill people to a federal database in order to prevent them from buying guns. Views were sought concerning the Virginia Tech shooting and university policies. Specifically, respondents were asked whether they thought school officials did or did not do enough to investigate concerns that the student who committed these shootings was mentally unstable, whether news organizations did the right thing or the wrong thing by airing photos and videos of the Virginia Tech gunman, whether they supported a law requiring universities to provide stricter screening and counseling for students who are suspected of being mentally unstable and possibly dangerous to themselves or others, and whether they supported changing confidentiality laws so that when a college student is suspected of being mentally disturbed, the school would be required to notify their parents. Views were also sought on the primary cause of gun violence in America and whether shootings like the one at Virginia Tech could happen in the respondent's community. Respondents were queried on whether they supported legislation giving Washington, D.C., a full voting member in the United States House of Representatives and whether they approved of the proposed law that would give Democratic D.C. a full voting member in the House, while also giving the Republican state of Utah another congressional seat. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education, political party affiliation, and political philosophy.

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Title: ABC News/Time Magazine Obesity Poll, May 2004

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 4040

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABCtmop04

Year: May 2004

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted May 10-16, 2004, was undertaken to assess public opinion on the problem of obesity in the United States. Respondents were asked to rate their own personal health and the importance of a healthy diet and physical exercise in their lives. Questions were posed regarding how often respondents and their children watched television, used the Internet, e-mail, or computer games for personal use, and engaged in moderate or vigorous physical exercise, how much influence their children had on what food the family ate, whether they kept a supply of fresh fruits and vegetables in their home, and whether they or their children were overweight. Respondents were polled on how often they ate at fast-food restaurants, whether they tried to track the amount of calories, carbohydrates, and fat content in their daily diets, whether they wanted to lose or gain weight, whether they had followed any type of weight-loss program, and whether it had helped them. Several questions asked about the hardest part of losing weight, the biggest causes of obesity in the United States, whether respondents had ever felt that they were discriminated against because of their weight, whether they had any negative feelings about people who were overweight, and whether certain groups or institutions such as the fast-food industry and government policies and laws bore any responsibility for the nation's obesity problem. Respondents were also polled on whether they would support or oppose government policies such as a tax on high-fat or high-sugar foods, requiring labels on certain foods warning of the health risks of being overweight, and setting a legal limit on portion sizes in restaurants. Other topics addressed whether health insurance companies should be able to drop coverage or charge higher premiums to people who are overweight, whether schools should be allowed to raise money by allowing soda and candy vending machines in school, the seriousness of problems such as cancer, AIDS, cigarette smoking, obesity, and drug and alcohol abuse as public health issues, and whether the federal government was doing enough about these problems. Background information includes sex, ethnicity, education, marital status, household income, number and sex of children in household, weight and height of respondents and children, and subjective size of the community: rural, urban, or suburban.

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Afghanistan Attack Poll #1, October 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3298

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABCAAP1OCT01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted October 7, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the United States military action in Afghanistan. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President Bush was handling the response to terrorist attacks in the United States, and whether they supported United States air strikes on Afghanistan and sending a significant number of United States ground troops into that country. Those polled also gave their opinions on whether capturing or killing Osama bin Laden and his associates was a higher priority than overthrowing the Taliban government and how concerned they were about the possibility of further terrorist attacks in America. Respondents also tried to predict whether it would be a quick military action or a long war, and whether the military action in Afghanistan would make further terrorist attacks against the United States more or less likely. Opinions were elicited on whether the United States should have done more to find a diplomatic solution before attacking Afghanistan, whether the United States should mount a broader war against terrorism, whether the United States government was doing enough in its anti-terrorism campaign to win the support of Muslim people, and whether respondents supported the humanitarian aid for Afghans. Background information on respondents includes gender and political party affiliation. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Afghanistan Attack Poll #2, October 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3299

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ABCAAP2OCT01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted October 8, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the United States military action in Afghanistan. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President Bush was handling the response to terrorist attacks in the United States, and whether they supported United States air strikes on Afghanistan and sending a significant number of United States ground troops into that country. Respondents were asked whether they believed that the United States government was doing all it reasonably could do to try to prevent further terrorist attacks and whether they supported United States military action against other countries supporting terrorism. Those polled expressed their level of concern about the possibility of further terrorist attacks (specifically biological and chemical) in America, and how confident they were in the abilities of the federal and local governments, police, and health agencies to respond effectively to a biological or chemical attack in the United States. A battery of questions focused on the Muslim religion and its believers, including whether respondents had a good basic understanding of Islam, how they viewed this religion, whether Arabs and Muslims had positive or negative opinions about the United States and reasons for these opinions, whether they thought the terrorists who attacked the United States in September were close in their views to the mainstream teachings of Islam, and whether they knew anyone who was a Muslim. Respondents also gave their opinions on whether the United States was doing enough to improve its image among Arabs and Muslims. Another subject of this survey was the Middle East. Those polled commented on whether they had more sympathy for Israel or for the Palestinian Authority, whether the United States should increase support for Israel or decrease support for Israel and recognize Palestine as an independent nation, and what was more important at this time--United States relations with Israel or with the Arab nations. Additional questions focused on the possibility of a broader war between the United States and its allies on one side and Arabs and Muslims on the other side, the efforts of the United States to avoid a broader war, and racial profiling and social consent for racial profiling as a tool against terrorism. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, race, Hispanic origin, religion, political party affiliation, political orientation, education, and objective size of community. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Anthrax Poll, October 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post.

Owner: ICPSR 3300

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Codename: ABCAPOCT01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted October 15, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, DC, the United States' war on terrorism, and the recent letters contaminated with anthrax bacteria being distributed through the mail. Respondents were asked how they viewed President George W. Bush and his handling of the United States' campaign against terrorism, whether they believed that the United States government was doing all it could to prevent further terrorist attacks against America, and whether they were concerned about the possibility that there would be more major terrorist attacks in the United States. A series of questions focusing on the anthrax attacks queried respondents on whether they were concerned that they or someone close to them would be a victim of an anthrax attack, how confident they were in the ability of the United States government to respond effectively to a large-scale biological or chemical attack in the United States, and how accurate they thought news media reports on the anthrax situation were. In addition, respondents were asked whether they had purchased or intended to purchase a supply of antibiotics in case of a biological attack, and, if they had purchased antibiotics, what brand they bought. Those queried were asked to assess their level of concern that the United States war on terrorism would grow into a broader war between the United States and its allies and the Arab and Muslim world, and whether the United States was doing all it reasonably could to avoid civilian casualties as a result of the military action in Afghanistan. Background information on respondents includes gender and political party. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Bush War Speech Poll, March 2003

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3781

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Codename: ABC-WPBWSP-MAR03

Year: 2003

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll was undertaken to assess public opinion on President George W. Bush's March 17, 2003, speech that threatened military action against Iraq. Respondents were asked whether they had watched or listened to any of the speech that evening, whether they supported or opposed the United States going to war with Iraq and the 48 hour deadline given for Saddam Hussein to leave his country, and how confident they were that President Bush's policy on Iraq was the right one for the United States. Several questions addressed the Bush Administration's decision not to have the United Nations Security Council vote on war with Iraq, whether the administration did enough to try to win support from other countries for taking military action against Iraq, whether the United States should offer Saddam Hussein and his sons amnesty in exchange for leaving Iraq, and whether Iraq could be disarmed and Saddam Hussein removed from power without going to war. Additional questions addressed whether the United States should show less cooperation and support for France and the United Nations in the future or continue its usual relationship, and whether the war with Iraq would increase or decrease the risk of further terrorism in the United States. Background variables include sex and political party affiliation. DATE ADDED: 06-04-2004.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Democratic Delegate Poll, July 1992

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 9935

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Codename: ABCwpddp92

Year: July 1992

Status: A

Description: This survey polled delegates to the 1992 Democratic National Convention. Respondents were asked to agree or disagree with statements covering a variety of issues, including raising taxes to deal with the federal budget deficit, a constitutional amendment outlawing abortion, and cutting defense spending in half over the next five years. Respondents were also asked whether it was the role of government to see to it that everyone had a job, whether they favored smaller government with fewer services or larger government with many services, and whether a breakdown in family values or government neglect of the cities was more responsible for the riots that had occurred in Los Angeles. The survey also posed questions regarding a tax cut for middle-income Americans and a program of national health insurance funded by tax increases. A major portion of the survey queried delegates on their choice for the 1992 Democratic nominee for president and vice president, and posed questions regarding various scenarios which assumed the nomination of Bill Clinton. Questions pertaining to the presidential election in general included delegates' opinions of Ross Perot, the likelihood of a race among Bush, Clinton, and Perot being decided in the House of Representatives, and whether Democratic House members should support Clinton unconditionally if the election was decided by the House of Representatives. Additionally, the survey questioned respondents about potential items for inclusion in the Democratic party platform, including increasing taxes to reduce the deficit, federally-funded abortion on demand, tax cuts for the middle class, limiting individual campaign contributions to $100, free trade with Mexico, and the $35 billion urban program proposed by the nation's mayors. Background information on delegates includes whether they held a Democratic party or public position and whether that position was elected or appointed, political orientation, education, age, religion, marital status, employment status, race, income, and sex.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Gays in the Military Poll, January 1993

Source: ABC News. THE WASHINGTON POST.

Owner: ICPSR 6178

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Codename: ABC93_JAN

Year: 1993

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll focused on the issue of homosexuals in the military. Respondents were asked if gays should be allowed to serve in the military, if they felt strongly about this matter, and, if opposed to gays serving in the military, the main reason they opposed it. Those surveyed were also asked if people who joined the military should be asked if they were gay, whether they approved of President Bill Clinton's handling of the issue of gays in the military, and whether Clinton had spent too much time on the issue. Additional questions concerned Clinton's appointment of his wife Hillary as head of a task force on health care reform, and her role in the Clinton Administration. Background information on respondents includes political party, age, sex, presence of a veteran of the United States armed forces in the household, and whether any close friends or relatives were homosexual.;

Media: FTP

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Ncases: 549


Title: ABC News/Washington Post Libby Indictment Two-Nighter Poll, October 2005

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 4523

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Codename: ABCWPLI_Oct05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted October 28-29, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. The focus of this poll was to ascertain the feelings and opinions of respondents surveyed about the federal grand jury's indictment of Lewis "Scooter" Libby, chief of staff for Vice President Dick Cheney. Libby was indicted on charges of obstruction of justice and perjury in connection with the case in which the identity of an undercover Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) agent was disclosed to news reporters. Respondents were asked if the charges against Libby represented a serious crime, or just a minor/technical one, and whether the prosecution's case was based on facts or political motivations. Given what respondents had read and heard concerning the involvement of President George W. Bush, Karl Rove (advisor to the president) and Vice President Cheney, they were queried on whether any of these men did anything wrong in connection with the case and whether their actions were considered illegal or unethical, but not illegal. Respondents were also asked if they approved of the way in which President Bush was handling his presidency and of the general ethical issues in government. Demographic variables include political party affiliation, age, gender, and the percentage of respondents that were Black, Hispanic, and Asian.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Monthly Poll #1, January 2006

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 4654

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Codename: ABCw1-Jan06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted January 5-8, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, ethics in government, and the United States campaign against terrorism. Views were sought on whether the war in Iraq was worth fighting, and whether the federal government was doing enough to protect the rights of American citizens and people suspected of involvement in terrorism. A series of questions addressed the level of honesty of members of the United States Congress, the level of corruption in federal, state, and local government, corruption charges against prominent lobbyist Jack Abrahmoff, and whether it should be legal for registered lobbyists to make campaign contributions to congressional members or candidates, give them gifts, or organize fund raisers on their behalf. Additional questions asked about upcoming Senate confirmation hearings for federal Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito and whether Alito would vote to overturn the Roe v. Wade ruling, which legalized abortion. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, political party affiliation, political philosophy, religious preference, and whether respondents considered themselves to be born-again Christians.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Monthly Poll, June 2011

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 35093

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Codename: ABCwJun11

Year: June 2011

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded June 2011, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on a range of political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the performance of President Obama and Congress on a range of topics including: the economy, the budget deficit, interventions in Afghanistan and Libya, terrorism, and job creation. Queries also investigated respondents' opinions of the Tea Party movement, health care and Social Security reform, economic recovery, and the quality of leadership provided by the political parties. Additional subjects included: nuclear power, the price of gasoline, and the 2012 elections, political partisanship, left-right political self-placement, and voting intentions. Demographic and other background information includes age, gender, race, religious affiliation, income, education, and locality of residence.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Monthly Poll, October 2010

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 32546

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Codename: ABCwpm_Oct10

Year: October 2010

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded October 25-28, 2010, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way Barack Obama was handling the presidency and the economy, how closely they were following the congressional election, what the chances were that they would vote in the upcoming congressional election, which party they would vote for in their congressional district, whether they normally vote in mid-term elections, whether they were inclined to vote to re-elect their representative in Congress, and whether or not they thought it would be a good thing if control of Congress switched from the Democrats to the Republicans after the November elections. Information was collected on whether respondents approved of the way the United States Congress was doing its job, whether they had a favorable or unfavorable impression of Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner, which party they trusted more to do a better job in coping with the main problems the nation faces over the next few years, which political party they trusted to do a better job handling the economy, and whether they thought that things in this country were generally going in the right direction. Respondents were queried on what they thought was a bigger risk, the Democrats putting in place too many government regulations or the Republicans not putting enough government regulations in place, whether they favored smaller government with fewer services or larger government with more services, and whether they had recently been contacted by an organization working in support of a candidate for Congress, asking for their vote. Respondents were also asked how they would describe the state of the nation's economy, whether they thought the economy was getting better or worse, whether they supported the political movement known as the Tea Party, whether they had a favorable or unfavorable impression of Sarah Palin and whether they thought Palin was qualified to serve as president. Finally, respondents were asked how important they thought it was to know who pays for campaign advertisements, who they would vote for if the candidates for president were Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert, and whether they favored or opposed legalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana for personal use. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, marital status, household income, education level, political party affiliation, political philosophy, political ideology, religious preference, union membership, and whether the respondent is a born-again Christian.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post National Traffic Poll, January 2005

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4315

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Codename: ABCNTP_Jan05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted January 26-31, 2005, was undertaken to assess public opinion about traffic. After first being asked their opinion of how President Bush was handling his term in office, respondents were queried about how often they traveled by car, traffic conditions in their area, and the availability and quality of public transportation and whether or not they used it. The survey also asked questions about respondents' commutes, opinions about traffic congestion, and possible measures to reduce congestion, such as tolls, high occupancy vehicle lanes, building new roads, better timing of traffic lights, carpools, and higher gas taxes. Respondents were also asked about air pollution from cars, how driving made them feel, how often they or others were guilty of speeding, not paying attention, being aggressive, and road rage. Other questions pertained to respondents' opinions of the greatest dangers to safety, how they passed time in traffic, and what type of vehicle they drove as well as their opinion of it. Demographic information included the number of licensed drivers and automobiles in their household, political orientation, education, age, marital status, number of children, Hispanic origin, ethnicity, income, and sex.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #1, April 2006

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4659

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Codename: ABCWPP-Apr06

Year:  April 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted April 6-9, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. A national sample of 1,229 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of 27 Black respondents and 202 respondents aged 65 and older. Part 1 contains data on non-oversample respondents and Black oversample respondents, while Part 2 contains information asked only of respondents aged 65 and older, including the aged 65 and older oversample. Respondents were queried on whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency, and issues such as the economy and the campaign against terrorism. Respondents were also asked whether they approved of the way the United States Congress and their own representatives were handling their jobs, whether they would vote for a Democratic or Republican candidate in the upcoming United States House of Representatives election, the importance of issues such as health care in their voting choice, and which party they trusted to handle the main problems the nation would face over the next few years. Views were also sought on the war in Iraq, whether United States military forces in Iraq should be withdrawn, and whether Iraq was currently in a state of civil war. A series of questions asked how much respondents knew about the new Medicare prescription drug program, whether they approved of it, and who was responsible for its creation. Respondents aged 65 and older were asked whether they took prescription drugs, whether they had signed up for the new Medicare prescription drug program, whether it saved them money, and whether the enrollment deadline should be extended. Other topics addressed the recent increase in gasoline prices, illegal immigration, government waste, a new Massachusetts law requiring all residents to have health insurance, and whether Congress should officially reprimand or impeach President Bush for authorizing wiretaps on suspected terrorists without court approval. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, household income, marital status, education level, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, religious preference, whether respondents considered themselves born-again or evangelical Christians, and whether they and their parents were born in the United States.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #1, August 2006

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4663

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Codename: ABCWPP-Aug06

Year: August 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted August 3-6, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as the situation in Iraq and the economy. Those registered to vote were asked how closely they were following the upcoming congressional elections in November, whether they would vote for a Democrat or Republican candidate for the United States House of Representatives if the election were held that day, and which issue was most important in their vote. All respondents were polled on which political party they trusted to handle issues such as the United States campaign against terrorism, which party was more concerned with the needs of people like themselves, whether they approved of the way the United States Congress was handling its job, and whether the Democrats were offering a clear direction that was different from that of the Republicans. Views were also sought on the war in Iraq, whether Iraq was in a state of civil war, and whether the Bush Administration and the Democrats in the United States Congress had a clear plan for handling the situation. A series of questions regarding the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon asked which group was to more to blame, whether Israel was justified in bombing Hezbollah targets in civilian areas, whether Israel should agree to an immediate, unconditional cease-fire in Lebanon, whether the conflict would make Israel more secure from attacks, and whether it would help or hurt the situation for the United States in Iraq. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, religious preference, and whether respondents considered themselves born-again or evangelical Christians.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #1, December 2007

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24593

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Codename: ABCwpp1_Dec07

Year: December 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded December 6-9, 2007, is a part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on various political and social issues. A national sample of 1,136 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of African Americans, for a total of 205 African Americans respondents. Respondents were asked whether they approved of George W. Bush and the way he was handling the presidency and other issues such as the economy and terrorism, whether they approved of the way Congress was handling its job, and which political party they trusted to handle issues such as the war in Iraq. Opinions were also solicited on the 2008 presidential candidates. Respondents were asked who they would vote for if the 2008 Democratic and Republican primaries were being held that day, what was the single most important issue in their choice for president in the 2008 presidential election, and whether they were more likely to vote for a candidate based on qualities such as religion, race, gender, or political interests. A series of questions asked how closely respondents were following the 2008 presidential race and how likely they were to vote in the 2008 presidential primary in their state, which candidate they thought was most likely to be elected president, and how much candidates' religious beliefs, endorsements, spouses, and professional abilities weighed in deciding who to support for president. Respondents were also asked whether Oprah Winfrey's endorsement of Barack Obama made them more likely to support him. Several questions asked about the war in Iraq, including whether the Iraq War was worth fighting, whether United States military forces should remain in Iraq until civil order is restored there, and whether the war in Iraq has contributed to the long-term security of the United States. Additional topics included abortion, whether the respondents considered themselves feminists, whether respondents had a good, basic understanding of the Mormon religion, respondents' own financial situation, and the state of the national economy. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, marital status, whether respondents own or rent their home, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), voter registration status, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and the presence of children under 18 in the household.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #1, June 2006

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4661

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Codename: ABCWPP-Jun05

Year: June 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted June 22-25, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as the economy and the situation in Iraq. Several questions asked which political party respondents trusted to handle the main problems the country would face in the next few years, whether they would vote for a Democrat or Republican candidate if the November 2006 election for the United States House of Representatives were being held that day, and which issue was most important in their vote. Views were sought on the war in Iraq and whether it had improved the lives of the Iraqi people, encouraged democracy in other Arab nations, and contributed to the long-term security of the United States. Respondents were polled on whether the Bush Administration and the Democrats in the United States Congress had a clear plan for handling the situation in Iraq, how well the United States campaign against terrorism was going, whether the country was safer from terrorism than before September 11, 2001, and whether President Bush would be remembered more for the United States campaign against terrorism or the war in Iraq. A series of questions asked respondents whether they approved of the way United States military forces in Iraq were doing their job, whether a deadline should be set for their withdrawal from Iraq, and respondents' reactions to the alleged killings of Iraqi civilians by United States military forces. Additional topics addressed the death penalty, the federal government's detention of suspected terrorists without trial in the United States military prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and the federal government's progress in its efforts to rebuild New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, religious preference, and whether respondents considered themselves born-again or evangelical Christians.

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #1, March 2006

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4657

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Codename: ABCWPP_Mar06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted March 2-5, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency as well as his handling of issues such as the situation in Iraq and health care. Those polled also gave their opinions of the condition of the national economy, the United States Congress, Vice President Dick Cheney, Senator Hillary Clinton, Senator John McCain, and the Democratic and Republican parties. A series of questions asked whether the war in Iraq was worth fighting, whether United States military forces should be increased, decreased, or maintained, whether progress was being made to restore civil order in Iraq and establish a democratic government, and whether the Bush Administration and the Democrats in Congress had a clear plan for handling the situation in Iraq. Views were also sought on the use of wiretapping and surveillance by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency in conducting the war on terrorism, whether the government was doing enough to protect the rights of American citizens, and whether the country was safer from terrorism now, as compared to before September 11, 2001. Additional topics addressed the bird flu virus, the Terri Schiavo case, the recent controversy surrounding a merger deal that would give management of six United States ports to a company owned by the United Arab Emirates, the religion of Islam, and whether respondents and any of their friends and relatives were prejudiced against Muslims and Arabs. Demographic variables included sex, age, race, household income, education level, religious affiliation, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #1, May 2006

Source: ABC News, The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4660

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Codename: ABCWPP-May06

Year:  May 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted May 11-15, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as the federal budget deficit and the economy, whether they approved of the way the United States Congress and their own representative were doing their jobs, and which political party they trusted to handle the main problems the country would face in the next few years. Several questions asked how closely respondents were following the upcoming November 2006 election, whether they would vote for a Democratic or Republican candidate for the United States House of Representatives, the reasons for their choice, and which political party they hoped would win control of Congress. Views were also sought on the war in Iraq, and whether the Bush administration intentionally misled the American public in making its case for war with Iraq. A series of questions asked respondents whether the country, their state, and their local community were headed in the right direction, how satisfied they were with their life, and whether they felt optimistic about the future. Those polled also gave their impressions of Senator Hillary Clinton, former President Bill Clinton, and Senator John McCain, as well as the likelihood that they would vote for Hillary Clinton and John McCain if they ran for president in 2008. Additional questions addressed Hillary Clinton's views on issues, whether she possessed qualities such as leadership and trustworthiness, and whether Bill Clinton had too much political influence over her. Other topics addressed illegal immigration, Bush administration policies, the recent increase in gasoline prices, and the secret collection of domestic telephone records by the National Security Agency. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, religious preference, and whether respondents considered themselves born-again or evangelical Christians.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll #2, December 2007

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24594

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Codename: ABCwpp2_Dec07

Year: December 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded December 16-19, 2007, is a part of continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on various political and social issues. A national sample of 1,142 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of 18-29 year olds, for a total of 274 respondents in this age group. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling the presidency and whether they thought the country was moving in the right direction. Several questions asked how closely respondents were following the 2008 presidential race, how likely they were to vote in the 2008 presidential primaries in their state, and for whom respondents would vote if the Democratic and Republican primaries and the general election were being held that day. A series of questions asked about respondents' use of the Internet, including whether they used the Internet for researching the 2008 presidential election, such as getting information about where to vote, participating in online discussions, watching video clips, and visiting social networking websites such as Facebook and MySpace to get information on political candidates. Many questions asked how much confidence and trust respondents had in traditional news media and the Internet for general information and specifically for information about the candidates in the presidential election, where they get most of their news about the election campaigns, whether they would approve of an Internet voting system if it was secure from fraud, and whether the Internet plays a positive role in the election campaigns. Respondents were also asked how much of a role their family and friends played in shaping their political opinions and whether they debate political issues with others in a face-to-face setting or online. Additional topics included the Iraq war, abortion, the death penalty, illegal immigrants, civil unions, feelings about American politics, voting, the United States government, whether respondents considered themselves feminists, and whether respondents have done volunteer work. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, employment status, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, marital status, whether respondents own or rent their home, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), voter registration status and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and the presence of children under 18 in the household.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, April 2008

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24606

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Codename: ABCwpp_April08

Year: April 2008

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded April 10-13, 2008, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. A random national sample of 1,197 adults were surveyed, including additional interviews with randomly selected African Americans and Catholics, for a total of 213 African American respondents and 292 Catholic respondents. Views were sought on how well George W. Bush was handling the presidency, the war in Iraq, and the economy. Respondents were asked what they thought was the single most important issue in their choice for president, and their opinion of Hillary Clinton, John McCain, Barack Obama, and Bill Clinton. Respondents were also queried on whether they thought the war in Iraq was worth fighting, whether significant progress was made toward restoring civil order, whether the United States should keep its military forces there until civil order is restored, and whether they thought the United States must win the war in Iraq for the war on terrorism to be a success. Information was collected on how closely respondents were following the 2008 presidential race, which candidate they would like see win the Democratic nomination for president, whether the tone of the Democratic campaign was positive, whether the length of the Democratic race was good for Democrats, and how the super delegates should choose which candidate to nominate based on different counting methods. Several questions asked respondents to compare Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, and which candidate they trusted to handle issues such as international trade, the economy, and health care. Respondents were asked which candidate they would vote for if the 2008 presidential election were being held that day and whether a Democratic or Republican president would do a better job handling the situation in Iraq and the economy. Views were sought on Pope Benedict XVI and whether he should maintain the traditional policies of the Roman Catholic Church, whether the Catholic Church is in touch with American Catholics today, policies on women becoming priests, marriage for Catholic priests, and how the Catholic Church has handled the issue of sexual abuse of children by priests. Additional topics included the Reverend Jeremiah Wright controversy, the state of the national economy, respondents' financial situation, gas prices, whether government assistance such as new tax breaks for businesses would avoid or soften a recession, and respondents' plans for a federal rebate. Demographics variables include sex, age, marital status, race, income, voter registration status, political ideology, political party affiliation, political philosophy, education level, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, and whether respondents considered themselves to be a born-again Christian.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, December 1987

Source: ABC News/Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 8925

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Codename: ABCD87

Year:  

Status:  

Description: This study is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluates the Reagan presidency and solicits opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Topics covered include the fall in stock prices, the Democratic and Republican candidates for president, Gary Hart's decision to re-enter the race, the economy and its impact on major purchases and other spending by the respondent, and the respondent's optimism regarding the economy and quality of life as compared to one year ago. Demographic characteristics also were recorded.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, December 2006

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 22165

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Codename: ABCwpp-Dec06

Year: December 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted December 7-11, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on various political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president and issues such as the economy, whether they approved of the way members of United States Congress and their own representative were handling their jobs, and to rate the condition of the national economy. Views were sought on the upcoming switch to Democratic control of Congress, what was the most important problem for President Bush and Congress to deal with in the next year and whether they trusted President Bush or Congress more to handle these problems. Several questions asked whether Congress should hold hearings on how the Bush Administration handled issues related to the war with Iraq and the United States' campaign against terrorism, whether the war with Iraq was worth fighting, whether the number of United States military casualties in Iraq was acceptable, and whether the war in Iraq has contributed to the long-term security of the United States. A series of questions asked whether the United States should keep its military forces in Iraq until civil order is restored there, whether the United States was winning the war in Iraq, whether respondents would describe the situation in Iraq as a civil war, and whether the United States should hold direct talks with Syria and Iran about the situation in Iraq. Respondents were asked whether they supported certain plans and decisions, such as the Iraq Study Group report, changing the primary mission of United States forces to supporting and training the Iraqi army, or reducing United States military and financial support of the Iraqi government. Several questions asked for respondents' opinions of current political leaders and the 2008 presidential candidates, which candidate they would vote for if the 2008 Democratic and Republican primaries were held that day, and whether a presidential candidate's gender, race, or religion would affect their vote. Additional topics included immigration, privacy rights, and whether respondents were hopeful about the upcoming year for themselves and the world. Demographic variables include sex, age, religion, race, education level, household income, whether anyone in the household was a military veteran, voter registration and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

Media: FTP

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, February 2008

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24605

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Codename: ABCWPP_Feb08

Year: February 2008

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded February 28-March 02, 2008, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. A national sample of 1,126 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of African Americans, for a total of 215 African American respondents. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, whether the war with Iraq was worth fighting, and whether respondents thought the United States was making significant progress toward restoring civil order in Iraq. Respondents were also asked how closely they were following the 2008 presidential race, the probability that they would vote in the primary, who they wanted to see win the Democratic/Republican presidential nomination, for whom they would vote in the general election if the election were held that day, their opinion of the candidates, who they would choose as the Democratic/Republican vice presidential running mate, and who they trusted to handle various issues such as health care, the economy, the war in Iraq, immigration issues, the United States' campaign against terrorism, and ethics in government. Demographic information includes voter registration status and participation history, sex, age, race, income, marital status, religious preference, whether the respondent considered themselves to be a born-again evangelical Christian, education level, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political philosophy, political party affiliation, and whether the respondent or anyone in the home was a military veteran.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, January 2008

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24603

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Codename: ABCwpp_Jan08

Year: January 2008

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded January 9-12, 2008, is a part of continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on various political and social issues. A national sample of 1,130 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of African Americans, for a total of 202 African American respondents. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president and other issues such as the situation in Iraq and the economy, and whether they thought things in the country were going in the right direction. This poll focused on the 2008 presidential election, and asked respondents what was the single most important issue in their choice for president, how closely they had been following the presidential race, how likely they were to vote in the 2008 presidential primary or caucus in their state, and which candidate they would vote for if the Democratic and Republican primaries were being held that day. Iowa and New Hampshire residents were asked whether they voted in the 2008 primaries in their states and for whom they voted. Respondents were asked for their opinions of the 2008 presidential candidates, including which Democratic and Republican candidates they trusted to handle issues such as health care, the United States campaign against terrorism, immigration, and international affairs, which types of characteristics were important to them in a candidate, which candidate would bring the most change to Washington, and which candidate had the best chance to get elected as president in November 2008. Several questions asked whether respondents were more or less enthusiastic about the candidates based on the possibility that they could become the first president who was African American, female, Mormon, 72 years old when elected, or a Baptist minister, whether being African American would help or hurt Barack Obama's candidacy, and whether the country needed a president to lead the nation in the same direction as George W. Bush. Additional topics included abortion, respondents' economic and financial situation, and the war in Iraq. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), whether respondents rented or owned their home, voter registration status and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, marital status, religious preference, and whether respondents considered themselves to be a born-again Christian.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, June 2005

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 4328

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Codename: ABCWPP_Jun05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: This monthly poll, undertaken June 2-5, 2005, queried respondents on a number of national issues. Respondents were asked to evaluate the performances of President George W. Bush, the United States Congress, and their own Representatives. The survey solicited respondents' opinions on social security plans, the war in Iraq, the national economy, and the war on terror. They were also asked about their feelings on the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, surveillance by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and if the United States was protecting its citizens. The survey also sought respondents' opinions on President George W. Bush, United States Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton and John McCain, and the Democratic and Republican parties. Other questions pertained to respondents' personal debt, vacation plans, and their opinions about global warming, stem cell research, Supreme Court nominations, oil drilling in Alaska, nuclear power plants, and whether or not respondents smoked. Demographic information included political affiliation, political ideology, education, age, religious affiliation, sex, race, and income.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, June 2008

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24608

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Codename: ABCWPP_June08

Year: June 2008

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded June 12-15, 2008, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. A national sample of 1,125 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of African Americans, for a total of 201 African American respondents. Views were sought on how well George W. Bush was handling the presidency and whether the country was moving in the right direction. Respondents were asked how closely they were following the 2008 presidential race, the likelihood that they would vote in the general election in November, for whom they would vote if the presidential election were held that day, their opinions of the candidates, and the most important issues in their vote for president. Those who identified themselves as Democrats were asked how they felt about the outcome of the Democratic primary, whether they had wanted Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton to win the Democratic nomination, and who Obama should choose as a vice presidential running mate. Respondents were also asked whether they would vote for the Democratic or Republican candidate for United States House of Representatives if the election were held that day, and to give their impressions of the spouses of the presidential candidates, Michelle Obama and Cindy McCain. Additional topics addressed abortion, the war in Iraq, health care coverage, alternative energy, gun ownership, race relations in the United States, increases in gasoline prices, and a recent United States Supreme Court ruling that noncitizens suspected of terrorism who are being held in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, should be allowed to challenge their detentions in the United States civilian court system. Information was also collected on whether respondents thought African Americans living in their community experienced racial discrimination, whether they had a close friend of a different race, whether they themselves had feelings of racial prejudice, and whether they considered themselves a feminist. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, marital status, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, education level, religious preference, and whether respondents considered themselves to be a born-again Christian.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, March 2005

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 4319

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Codename: ABCWPP_MAR05

Year: March 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted March 10-13, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Views were sought on identity theft, personal privacy protection, the United States' campaign against terrorism, the war with Iraq, the economy, Social Security, increasing the Social Security tax rate, and health care. Moreover, respondents were queried on whether they felt that the Bush administration misled the American public when making a case for waging war in Iraq, whether the war in Iraq was a mistake, whether the presence of United States military forces in Iraq should be withdrawn, increased, or decreased, whether the Iraqi people supported or opposed the goals set forth by the United States in their country, and whether the recent Iraqi election could produce a stable government. Respondents were also asked about weapons of mass destruction as they related to Iran, North Korea, and Syria. Demographic variables include race, gender, age, level of education, employment status, income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and religious affiliation.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, October 2005

Source: ABC News,The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4524

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Codename: ABCWPP_Oct05

Year: October 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted October 30-November 2, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, foreign policy, the economy, the United States campaign against terrorism, the situation with Iraq, gasoline prices, and health care. Those polled expressed their opinion on whether they felt Bush was a strong leader that understood the problems facing the respondent. Respondents were also queried on the Bush Administration regarding their confidence in it, its policies, and the amount of influence that various individuals and religious groups had on it. Additionally, they were asked whether they felt that the Democrats or the Republicans would be better suited to handle the nation's main problems and which of the two parties represented their own values and needs better. They were also asked to compare the differences in honesty between the two parties. Another topic of the survey was the upcoming November 2006 congressional election. Respondents were asked which party they would vote for if the election were held at the time of this survey. Questions concerning the ethics of President Bush and the federal government were also included. Some of the questions examined the war in Iraq. These included costs versus benefits, acceptance of the number of United States casualties, progress toward restoring civil order and establishing a democratic government, and whether the United States should keep or withdraw military forces in Iraq. A series of additional questions asked the respondents to give their opinions on whether the charge brought against the vice president's chief of staff, Lewis Libby, was serious or minor. Respondents were also asked if presidential advisor Karl Rove, Vice President Dick Cheney, and President Bush did anything wrong in connection to the case. Demographic variables include race, sex, age, level of education, income, voter registration status, political ideology, party affiliation, and religion.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, October 2007

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24592

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Codename: ABCwpp_Oct07

Year: October 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded October 29 through November 1, 2007, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. A national sample of 1,131 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of African Americans, for a total of 203 African Americans respondents. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, and whether they approved of the way the Congress was doing its job, whether they approved of the way the Republicans in Congress and the Democrats in Congress were doing their jobs, and who respondents wanted to see in control of Congress after the next congressional election. Opinions were sought on whether things in this country were on the right track, and who could be trusted more, the Democrats or the Republicans, to do a better job handling the situation in Iraq, health care, the United States campaign on terrorism, the economy, taxes, and immigration issues. Several questions were asked about the war in Iraq, including whether the war was worth fighting, whether the United States was making progress in restoring civil order in Iraq, whether the number of military forces should be increased, and whether United States forces in Iraq should be withdrawn immediately. Respondents were also asked how closely they were following the 2008 presidential race, for whom they would vote if the 2008 presidential primary were held that day, their opinion of the candidates, who they thought was best able to handle various situations facing the country, and their opinion of the most important issue in their choice for president. Additional topics covered whether the respondent was a feminist, whether smaller or larger governments were favored, whether homosexual couples should be allowed to form recognized civil unions, whether giving illegal immigrants the right to legally live in the United States was supported, whether abortion should be legal, and opinions about the nation?s economy and a possible recession. Demographic information includes voter registration status and participation history, sex, age, race, income, marital status, religious preference, religious service attendance, education level, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political philosophy, and political party affiliation.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Poll, September 2007

Source:  ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 24591

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Codename: ABCwpp_Sep07

Year: September 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded September 27-30, 2007, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. A national sample of 1,114 adults was surveyed, including an oversample of African Americans, for a total of 212 African Americans respondents. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, and whether they approved of the way he was handling of the situation in Iraq, health care, the federal budget deficit, the economy, and the United States campaign against terrorism. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way the Republicans in Congress and the Democrats in Congress were doing their jobs. Opinions were sought on the amount that Congress had accomplished that year, and whether Democrats or Republicans in Congress could be trusted more to do a better job handling the situation in Iraq, health care, the United States campaign on terrorism, the economy, and the federal budget deficit. Several questions were asked about the war in Iraq, including whether the war in Iraq was worth fighting, whether the United States should keep military forces in Iraq until civil order is restored, whether an increase in United States forces in Iraq made the situation there better, whether the pace of troop reduction in Iraq should be increased, and whether a funding request for the war should be approved by Congress. Respondents were also asked how closely they were following the 2008 presidential race, for whom they would vote if the 2008 presidential primary were held that day, their opinion of the candidates, and whether they would vote for specific candidates if they won their party?s nomination. Several questions also addressed Hillary Clinton including whether her views on issues were too liberal, whether she would take the presidency in a different direction than her husband if elected, whether her campaign was engaging in improper fund raising, and whether respondents felt comfortable with the idea of Bill Clinton as a first gentleman. Other topics included whether the respondent considered her or himself to be a feminist, quality of health care, health care costs, whether the cigarette tax should be increased to support federal spending on children?s health insurance, and whether respondents approved of the way Bill Clinton handled his job as president while in office. Demographic information includes voter registration status and participation history, sex, age, race, income, marital status, religious preference, religious service attendance, education level, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political philosophy, political party affiliation, and whether the respondent or anyone in the home was a military veteran.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Pre-Election Poll #1, October 2006

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 22163

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Codename: abcP-Oct06

Year: October 2006

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted October 19-22, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, whether they approved of the way Congress and their own representative in Congress was handling their job, and to rate the condition of the national economy. Registered voters were asked whether they followed the congressional elections, whether they were likely to vote, and which candidate they would vote for if the election were being held that day. Registered voters who had already voted absentee were asked which candidate they voted for, how enthusiastic they were about their vote, and whether their vote was more for one political party, or more against the other political party. Opinions were solicited on what was the most important issue in congressional elections, whether things in the country were generally going in the right direction, whether their reason for voting for a candidate for Congress included showing support for George W. Bush, which political party they trusted to do a better job handling issues such as the situation in Iraq and the economy, and whether they thought a change of control from the Republicans to the Democrats would be a good thing. Information was collected on whether respondents had been contacted by any organization working in support of a candidate for Congress and which political party they were asked to vote for, whether the 2006 congressional elections were more important to the country than past elections, and whether the war with Iraq was worth fighting. Additional questions asked how much Congress should be blamed for problems relating to the war with Iraq, how much credit Congress should get for preventing terrorist attacks, whether respondents felt optimistic about the situation in Iraq, and if the United States had the same kind of involvement in the war with Iraq as it did the Vietnam war. Demographic variables include sex, age, religion, race, education level, household income, labor union membership, voter registration and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, employment status, marital status, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Pre-Election Poll #2, November 2006

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 22164

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Codename: abcP2-Nov06

Year: November 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted November 1-4, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, whether they approved of the way the United States Congress and their own representative in Congress was handling their job, and to rate the condition of the national economy. Registered voters were asked whether they were following the upcoming congressional mid-term elections on November 7, 2006, whether they were likely to vote, and which candidate they would vote for if the election were being held that day. Registered voters who had already voted were asked which candidate they voted for, how enthusiastic they were about their vote, and whether their vote was more for one political party, or more against the other political party. Opinions were solicited on what was the most important issue in the vote for Congress, whether things in the country were generally going in the right direction, whether their reason for voting for Congress included showing support for George W. Bush, and which political party they trusted to do a better job handling issues such as the situation in Iraq and the economy. Information was collected on whether respondents had been contacted by any organization working in support of a candidate for Congress and if so, which political party they were asked to vote for, which political party best represented their own personal values, and whether the war with Iraq was worth fighting. Demographic variables include sex, age, religious preference, race, education level, voter registration and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, marital status, whether anyone in the household was a veteran, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Republican Convention Closer Poll, September 2004

Source: ABC News/Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 4122

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Codename: ABCWPR_SEP04

Year: September 2004

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted September 6-8, 2004, was undertaken to gather voters' opinions regarding the 2004 presidential election. Respondents were asked how closely they were paying attention to the campaign, the likelihood that they would vote, and how they rated the importance of certain issues such as heath care and education. Also, they were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling the presidency, the economy, the situation in Iraq, and the United States campaign on terrorism. The survey also contained questions about ideal qualities for a president, which candidate was better qualified, John Kerry's Vietnam War opposition, and the effects of government programs. Respondents were queried about their opinions on the national economy, the war on terrorism, the possibility of terrorist attacks, and the war in Iraq. Background information on respondents includes political party preference, union membership, political ideology, marital status, veteran status, religious affiliation, age, sex, education, race, and income.

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post Republican Delegate Poll, August 1992

Source: ABC News; The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 6015

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Codename: ABCwprdp92

Year: August 1992

Status: A

Description: Since 1981, ABC News and The Washington Post, both separately and together, have commissioned public opinion polls to collect information on the American public's attitudes and opinions on various issues. These surveys, conducted by Chilton Research Services until mid-1999 and subsequently by Taylor Nelson Sofres Intersearch, gather information in the form of monthly and special topic polls. Monthly polls solicit respondent information on the presidency and on a variety of other political and social issues. Special topic polls focus on specific events or issues that are of timely significance.

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Terrorist Attack Poll #1, September 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3289

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Codename: ABCTAP1SEP01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted September 11, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the terrorist attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center towers in New York City, damaged the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and resulted in a plane crash in Pennsylvania, earlier that day. Respondents were asked whether they believed that the United States government did all it reasonably could do to try to prevent the attacks, whether they were confident in the ability of the United States government to prevent further terrorist attacks against America, and whether they were concerned that someone they knew or their community might be a victim of future acts of terrorism. Assuming that the United States is able to identify the groups and/or nations responsible for the attacks, those queried were asked whether they would support taking military action in response, whether they would support such action if it meant war, and whether military action should be taken against countries that assist or shelter known terrorists. The poll gauged respondents' level of confidence in the ability of the United States government to find and punish those responsible and assessed whether respondents were willing to give up some liberties to crack down on terrorism. In addition, those surveyed were asked whether they did any of the following on that day: contacted family and friends, stayed home or left work early, watched or listened to broadcast news, prayed for the victims and their families, and/or changed their daily routines. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, employment status, Hispanic origin, and size of community in which they resided. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Terrorist Attack Poll #2, September 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3290

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Codename: ABCTAP2SEP01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted September 13, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the terrorist attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center towers in New York City, damaged the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and resulted in a plane crash in Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency and the terrorist attacks. Respondents were asked whether they believed that the United States government did all it reasonably could do to try to prevent the attacks, and whether they were confident in the ability of the United States government to prevent future terrorist attacks against America. Assuming that the United States is able to identify the groups and/or nations responsible for the attacks, those queried were asked whether they would support taking military action in response. Respondents were asked whether they would feel the same way if military action meant that innocent civilians in other countries might be injured or killed and if military action resulted in a long war with large numbers of troops injured or killed. Those queried were asked whether they believed that the United States would go to war as a result of Tuesday's attacks. Respondents' opinions were elicited on Osama bin Laden, a suspect in the recent attacks, who reportedly lived in Afghanistan and was indicted for directing previous terrorist attacks. They were asked whether they would support attacking Afghanistan militarily if Afghanistan did not turn bin Laden over to the United States. Respondents were also asked whether they would support new laws that would make it easier for the FBI and other authorities to investigate suspected terrorists, giving up some of their personal liberties and privacy as a result of such laws, and whether they would support new airport security measures that might cause long delays in air travel. Those surveyed were asked about their personal safety concerns regarding upcoming air travel and whether they had cancelled or were planning to cancel future travel plans. Additional topics covered whether the attacks had made respondents more suspicious of people of Arab descent, how their children were reacting to the acts of terrorism, and whether the economy was heading into a recession. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, political party, children in household, and frequency of air travel. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001.

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Terrorist Attack Poll #3, September 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3294

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Codename: ABCTAP3SEP01

Year: 2001

Status:  

Description: This special topic poll, conducted September 20, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the terrorist attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center towers in New York City, damaged the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and caused a plane crash in Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. Respondents were asked whether they approved of President George W. Bush's response to the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks as well as his proposed remedies, what the consequences were of various levels of military action that could be taken in response to the terrorist threat, and how they viewed the state of the nation's economy. Respondents were also asked whether they watched or listened to any of Bush's address to Congress on September 20, 2001, how much Bush's proposed measures such as stricter airport security, stronger law enforcement efforts, and the creation of a new White House office for domestic security would reduce the risk of another major terrorist attack in this country, and whether Bush's speech made respondents more or less confident in the ability of the United States to deal with the crisis. Assuming that the groups and nations responsible for the terrorist attacks were identified, respondents were asked whether they would support military action against these groups, and whether they would support military action even if it meant getting into a war. Opinions were elicited on whether the United States should limit its military action to the terrorist groups and nations responsible for the September 11, 2001, attacks or broaden its actions to include all terrorist groups and nations, whether taking or not taking military action would result in a greater risk of further terrorism in this country, whether large numbers of troops would be killed and wounded, and whether military action would last for a few weeks, a few months, a year or so, or several years. Concerning the nation's economy, respondents were asked to describe the current state of the economy as excellent, good, not so good, or poor, and to comment on whether the economy was heading into a recession. Background information on respondents includes political party, age, race, and gender. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001.

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Title: ABC News/WASHINGTON POST Terrorist Attack Poll #4, September 2001

Source: ABC News/The Washington Post

Owner: ICPSR 3295

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Codename: ABCTAP4SEP01

Year: 2001

Status:  

Description: This special topic poll, conducted September 25-27, 2001, was undertaken to assess respondents' reactions to and feelings about the terrorist attacks that destroyed the World Trade Center towers in New York City, damaged the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and caused a plane crash in Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and the terrorist attacks. Respondents were also asked whether they would support taking military action in response, and whether they believed that the United States government would go to war as a result of the attacks. They were further asked whether they would feel the same way if military action caused the death of or injured innocent civilians in other countries and large numbers of American troops due to a long war. Respondents were queried on whether they would support mounting a broader war against terrorist groups and the nations that support them, whether they believed there would be more major terrorist attacks in this country, what the United States must do in its war on international terrorism, and, supposing that the United States accomplished all of its objectives, whether it would still have won the war on terrorism if there were to be another major terrorist attack. Respondents' opinions were elicited on Osama bin Laden, the main suspect in the attack, who was reportedly living in Afghanistan. They were asked whether they believed that the United States would capture or kill bin Laden, and would be able to significantly reduce terrorist attacks against the United States. Respondents were also asked whether action on education reform and prescription drugs for seniors should be postponed for at least a year because of the war on terrorism. Additional topics covered how much the respondents trusted the government to do the right thing, how patriotic they were, whether they appreciated more the privileges they had in this country, and whether they were more willing to make personal sacrifices for the good of the country. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, political party, education, residency, marital status, children in household, race, and household income. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001

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Title: ABC News/Washington Post/Stanford University Global Warming Poll, April 2007

Source: ABC News

Owner: ICPSR 24585

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Codename: abc-GWP07

Year: April 2007

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted April 5-10, 2007, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. The focus of this poll was environmental issues. Respondents were asked to rate the condition of the natural environment and to give their opinions about the biggest environmental problem the world faces today. Questions about weather patterns focused on whether the respondent thought the average temperature in the United States and in the world had increased over time, and whether they believed the earth's temperature had been increasing over the past 100 years. Respondent's opinions about global warming were collected and included information on how important global warming was to the respondent, how serious it was to them, how much could be done to reduce future global warming, how much could be done to reduce the effect of global warming on people and on the environment, and whether the federal government should do more to try to deal with global warming. Respondents of this poll were also asked a series of questions about national parks such as whether the respondent had ever visited a national park in the United States, whether the country's national parks were better compared to five years ago, whether they are well managed, and what respondents thought should have priority at national parks. Other questions asked whether respondents favored or opposed tax increases on electricity and gas, building cars that use less gas, building appliances that use less electricity, building homes and offices that use less energy for heating and cooling, and lowering the amount of greenhouse gases allowed into the air. Respondents were also asked who they trusted to do a better job, President Bush or the Congress, handling the overall environment, global warming, and the national parks. Demographic information includes respondent sex, age, race, income, marital status, religious preference, education level, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political philosophy, political party affiliation, whether the respondent owed or rented their home, and whether there was any children under the age of 18 living at the respondent's home.

Media: FTP

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Title: African Coup Events Data, 1986-1990

Source: Wang, T.Y.

Owner: ICPSR 6869

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Codename: aced86-90

Year: 1986-1990

Status: A

Description: This survey focuses on coup events in African countries where a state's military, security, or police force was involved. Annual data were collected for coup events between 1986 and 1990 in 45 sub-Saharan African countries. This study replicates McGowan's coding scheme and method of collecting African coup data (see the Related Publication section). Variables include number of successful, attempted, and plotted military coups, as well as year and country name. Date added: 2/4/2002.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Botswana, 2005

Source: Mogopodi Lekorwe, University of Botswana. Department of Political and Administrative Studies

Owner: ICPSR 22021

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Codename: afrob-Bot05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Botswana. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Botswana's President Festus Mogae and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Ghana, 2005

Source: E. Gyimah-Boadi, Center of Democratic Development

Owner: ICPSR 22201

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Codename: afrob-Gha05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Ghana. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Ghana's President John Agyekum Kufuor and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Kenya, 2005

Source: Winnie Mitullah, University of Nairobi. Institute for Development Studies

Owner: ICPSR 22202

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Codename: afrob-Ken05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Kenya. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Kenya's President Mwai Kibaki and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self- identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in 18 African Countries, 2005-2006

Source: Bratton, Michael; Gyimah-Boadi, E.

Owner: ICPSR 22981

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Codename: afrob05_06

Year: 2005-2006

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of 18 countries: Benin, Botswana, Cape Verde, Ghana, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their presidents' and the presidents' administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities were fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Benin, 2005

Source: Gregoire Kpekpede, Institute for Empirical Research in Political Economy (IREEP)

Owner: ICPSR 22020

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Codename: afrob-Ben05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Benin. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Benin's President Thomas Yayi Boni and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Cape Verde, 2005

Source: Reis, Deolinda; Bratton, Michael

Owner: ICPSR 22022

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Codename: afrob_Cape05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Cape Verde. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Cape Verde's President Pedro Verona Pires and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Lesotho, 2005

Source: David Hall, Sechaba Consultants, Maseru

Owner: ICPSR 22203

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Codename: afrob-Les05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Lesotho. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Lesotho's Prime Minister Pakalitha Mosisili and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Madagascar, 2005

Source: Mireille Razafindrakoto, National Institute of Statistics (INSTAT) and COEF Ressources

Owner: ICPSR 22204

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Codename: afrob-Mad05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Madagascar. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Madagascar's President Marc Ravalomanana and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, as well as whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Malawi, 2005

Source: Blessings Chinsinga, Centre for Social Research (CSR);Michael Bratton, Michigan State University

Owner: ICPSR 22205

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Codename: afrob-Mal05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Malawi. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Malawi's President Bingu wa Mutharika and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems exist with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Mali, 2005

Source:  Massa Coulibaly, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Appliquee et Theorique (GREAT)

Owner: ICPSR 22206

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Codename: afrob-Mali05

Year:  2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Mali. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Mali's President Amadou Toumani Toure and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Mozambique, 2005

Source: Carlos Shenga, Institute for Social and Economic Studies (IESE);Michael Bratton, Michigan State University

Owner: ICPSR 22207

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Codename: afrob-Moz05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Mozambique. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Mozambique's President Armando Guebuza and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, and methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, and news and information. Other questions asked about the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems exist with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Namibia, 2006

Source: Bill Lindeke, Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR)

Owner: ICPSR 22208

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Codename: afrob-Nam06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Namibia. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Namibia's President Samuel Shafiihuma Nujoma and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

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Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Nigeria, 2005

Source: Innocent Chukwuma, CLEEN Foundation

Owner: ICPSR 22209

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Codename: afrob3-Nig05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Nigeria. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Nigeria's President Olusegun Obasanjo and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview, observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

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Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Senegal, 2005

Source: Babaly Sall, GERCOP l'ENEA, Universite Gaston Berger de Saint Louis

Owner: ICPSR 22210

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob-Sen05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Senegal. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Senegal's President Abdoulaye Wade and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent is head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in South Africa, 2005

Source: Robert Mattes, The Institute for Democracy in South Africa (IDASA)

Owner: icpsr 22211

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: afrob3-SA05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of South Africa. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate South Africa's President Thabo Mbeki and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview, observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FYP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Tanzania, 2005

Source: Lucas Katera, Research on Poverty Alleviation (REPOA)

Owner: ICPSR 22212

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob3-Tan05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Tanzania. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Tanzania's President Benjamin William Mkapa and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in the interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview, observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Uganda, 2005

Source: Francis Kibirige, Wilsken Agencies;Robert Sentamu, Wilsken Agencies;Michael Bratton, Michigan State University

Owner: ICPSR 22213

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob-Uga05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Uganda. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Uganda's President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview, observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Zambia, 2005

Source: Peter Lolojih, University of Zambia

Owner: ICPSR 22214

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob-Zam05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Zambia. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Zambia's President Levy Mwanawasa and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, as well as whether problems exist with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 3: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Zimbabwe, 2005

Source: Eldred Masunungure, Mass Public Opinion Institute (MPOI)

Owner: ICPSR 22215

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob3-Zim05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Zimbabwe. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in 20 African Countries, 2008-2009

Source: Bratton, Michael, Michigan State University; Gyimah-Boadi, E., Ghana Center for Democratic Development; Mattes, Robert, University of Cape Town

Owner: ICPSR 33701

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob_Afr09

Year: 2008-2009

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, governance, economic reform, quality of life, and civil society in several Sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of 20 countries: Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their presidents and the presidents' administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities were fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, the ease of obtaining assistance for certain services, and whether problems existed with school and the local public clinic or hospital. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, and type of physical disability, if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and their observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Cape Verde, 2008

Source: Reis, Deolinda, Afrosondagem; Rodrigues, Francisco, Afrosondagem;

Owner: ICPSR 33825

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: Afrob-CV08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Cape Verde. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' economic conditions, and respondents' living conditions. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, race, and education level is provided.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Ghana, 2008

Source: Asunka, E. Joseph, Ghana Center for Democratic Development; Armah Attoh, Daniel, Ghana Center for Democratic Development;

Owner: ICPSR 33883

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: Afrob-Gha08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Ghana. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of Ghana, and the respondents' economic and living conditions. Additional questions asked how women should campaign for parliament, the respondents source of spiritual strength, and whether success in life individually and in Ghana was determined by spiritual strength or hard work. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, and race, is provided. More information may be found in the Principal Investigator's original documentation section of the codebook.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Lesotho, 2008

Source: Hall, David, Sechaba Consultants; Leduka, Clement, Sechaba Consultants; Gyimah-Boadi, E., Ghana Center for Democratic Development;

Owner: ICPSR 34003

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: Afrob-Les08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Lesotho. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' economic conditions, and respondents' living conditions. Additional topics include the 2007 post-election dispute, links to South Africa, and the benefits of being a member of the ruling party. The standard questions about available facilities were asked, but were more specific to Lesotho. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, race, and education level is provided.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Mali, 2008

Source: Coulibaly, Massa, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Theorique et Appliquee;

Owner: ICPSR 34006

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: Afrob-Mal08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Mali. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' economic conditions, and respondents' living conditions. Additional topics include corruption of religious leaders, possession of pieces of personal identity for proof of citizenship status, the crisis in the schooling system, the rebellion in the North, and decentralization of government structures. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in the interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, race, and education level is provided.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Mozambique, 2008

Source: Shenga, Carlos, Eduardo Mondlane University (Mozambique). Center for Policy Analysis; Pereira, Amilcar, Eduardo Mondlane University (Mozambique).

Owner: ICPSR 34007

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob_Moz08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Mozambique. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' economic conditions, and respondents' living conditions. Additional topics included the Constitutional Council (Court), whether the president should be able to send the prime minister to report to the Assembly of the Republic, the partisanship of the Constitutional Council and National Electoral Commission, the public transport service, and trade with other democratic countries. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, race, and education level is provided.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Tanzania, 2008

Source: Katera, Lucas, Research on Poverty Alleviation (Tanzania) ; Jahari, Cornel, Research on Poverty Alleviation (Tanzania) ;

Owner: ICPSR 34012

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob_Tan08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Tanzania. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, the accountability and integrity of government officials, the proposed federation of East African states, the level of trust in other Tanzanians, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' economic conditions, and respondents' living conditions. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, ownership and utilization of technology, water usage, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in interview. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and their observations of the respondent's attitude during the interview and of the interview environment.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 4: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Uganda, 2008

Source: Sentamu, Robert, Wilsken Agencies; Ogwapit, Joseph, Wilsken Agencies; Mukiibi, Andrew, Wilsken Agencies;

Owner: ICPSR 34013

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: Afrob-Uga08

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Uganda. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' economic conditions, and respondents' living conditions. Additional topics include the Trust Amnesty Commission, the Trust International Criminal Court, civil society organizations, political parties, political meeting attendance, the conflict in and reconstruction of northern Uganda, and the proposed federation of the East African States. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, and language used in interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, race, and education level is provided.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer Round 5: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in Botswana, 2012

Source:  Logan, Carolyn, Michigan State University; Gyimah-Boadi, E., Ghana Center for Democratic Development

Owner: ICPSR 34888

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob-Bot12

Year: 2012

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to collect and disseminate information regarding Africans' views on democracy, governance, economic reform, civil society, and quality of life. This particular data collection was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Botswana. Respondents in a face-to-face interview were asked to rate their president and the president's administration in overall performance, to state the most important issues facing their nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Additionally, respondents were polled on their knowledge of the government, including the identification of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, their participation in national elections, and the inclusiveness of the government. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondents' living conditions. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, education, religious affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of the household, current and past employment status, and language used in interview. In addition, the interviewer's gender, race, and education level is provided.

Media: FTP

Data Sets: Get Files

Ncases:  


Title: Afrobarometer: Round 2.5 Survey of South Africa, 2004

Source: Michael Bratton, Michigan State University

Owner: ICPSR 4702

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: afrob-04

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, markets, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of South Africa. Respondents gave their opinions of the performance of South Africa's President Thabo Mbeki and elected officials in local and national government, the government's handling of issues such as crime and the economy, the most important issues facing the nation, and whether the country was heading in the right direction. A series of questions addressed respondents' living conditions, the economic conditions and political influence of their own ethnic group compared to other groups in the country, and whether they felt more attached to their national identity or their ethnic group. Views were sought on the past, present, and future of economic conditions in the country, economic policies and reform, political parties, income inequality, civil rights, equal rights for women, and whether laws were enforced equally. Respondents rated their level of trust in the government, military, courts, the media, and others, the level of corruption existing in these groups, the ease of obtaining assistance with securing documents and government services, the methods by which respondents did so, and how often in the past year respondents had paid a bribe to a government official. Other questions asked about respondents' interest in public affairs, their level of civic engagement, and their satisfaction with the way democracy and elections worked in South Africa. Respondents were quizzed on their knowledge of government officials, presidential term limits, and government policy, and gave their interpretation of the concept of democracy. Additional questions asked about media sources of information, respondents' ownership of consumer goods such as books and automobiles, their physical and mental health status, and whether any close friends or relatives had died of AIDS. Information was also collected on the presence of institutions, public utilities, and soliders in the area. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, ethnicity, education level, language, employment status, occupation, voter registration status and participation history, political party affiliation, religious preference, religious participation, and type of residential area (e.g., urban, rural, etc.).

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round I Survey of South Africa, July-August 2000

Source: Mattes, Robert, Yul Derek Davids, and Cherrel Africa

Owner: ICPSR 3934

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Codename: AFROBR1SOSA2001

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This survey is part of a series of studies designed to assess attitudes about democracy, markets, and civil society in African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of South Africa. Respondents were asked to rate South African President Mbeki and his administrations' overall performance and to state the most important issue facing the nation. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the South African Defense Force, the media, the Independent Electoral Commission, and the South African Broadcasting Corporation could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and what their reactions would be to executive branch-sponsored government-imposed restrictions or prohibitions on the media, the judicial system, and parliament. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, whether great income disparities are fair, and whether encouraging people to start small businesses would create more jobs. Societal questions addressed how much trust could be placed in others, whether it is wise to plan ahead, whether everyone should be responsible for themselves and their own success or failure, what characteristics respondents used to identify themselves, whether it was easy to obtain assistance with securing food, water, schooling, and medical services, and by what methods respondents secured food, water, news, information, and medical services. Respondents were also asked whether they had checked with other adults in their household to answer questions. Background variables include age, language spoken most at home, education, current employment status, employment status over the last 12 months, employment history, family financial situation over the last 12 months, monetary support system, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, sex, ethnicity, type of physical disability, if any, type of housing, location of interview (inside, outside, or both), and respondent's attitude during interview. DATE ADDED: 06-02-2004.

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round II 16-Country Merged Dataset, 2003-2004

Source: Cherrel Africa, Institute for Democracy in South Africa (IDASA)

Owner: ICPSR 4558

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Codename: afrob_03

Year: 2003-2004

Status: A

Description: Africa, Cherrel, Etannabi Alemika, Michael Bratton, Amon Chaligha Massa Coulibaly, Mamadou Dansokho, Derek Davids, Reis Deolinda, Annie Dzenga, Thuso Green, E. Gyimah-Boadi, Christiaan Keulder, Stanley Khaila, Mogoodi Lekorwe, Carolyn Logan, Robert Mattes, Mpho Molomo, Chileshe Mulenga, Suzie Muwanga, Joao Pereira, Deolinda Reis, Fransico Rodrigues, Joseph Semboja, Robert Sentamu, Masipula Sithole, and Maxton Tsoka. AFROBAROMETER: ROUND II 16-COUNTRY MERGED DATASET, 2003-2004 [Computer file]. ICPSR04558-v1. Gaborone, Botswana: University of Botswana, Centre of Specialisation in Public Administration and Management (CESPAM) and Department of Political and Administrative Studies/Praia, Cape Verde: Afro-Sondagem/Accra, Ghana: Center for Democratic Development/Nairobi, Kenya: Centre for Independent Research/Maseru, Lesotho: Sechaba Consultants/Lilongwe, Malawi: Agricultural Policy Analysis Unit (APRU), Bunda College of Agriculture/Bamako, Mali: Groupe de Recherche en Economie Appliquee et Theorique (GREAT)/Maputo, Mozambique: Centre for Population Studies (CEP), Eduardo Mondlane University/Windhoek, Namibia: Research Facilitation Services (RFS)/Lagos, Nigeria: Research and Marketing Services (RMS)/Saint-Louis, Senegal: L'Universite Gaston Berger de Saint-Louis, GERCOP l'ENEA/South Africa: Citizens Surveys (Pty.), Ltd./Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: Research on Poverty Alleviation (REPOA)/Kampala, Uganda: Wilsken Agencies Ltd./Lusaka, Zambia: Development Research Group/Harare, Zimbabwe: Mass Public Opinion Institute (MPOI/East Lansing, MI: Michigan State University [producers], 2007. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2007-08-24.

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round II Survey of Cape Verde, 2002

Source: Barry Ames, University of Pittsburgh

Owner: ICPSR 4232

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Codename: afrob_CV02

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, markets, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Cape Verde. Respondents were asked to rate Cape Verde's President Pires and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, education, religious affiliation and participation, political party affiliation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was the head of household, number of children under 18 in household, type of housing, household income, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, type of physical disability, and if any. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of respondent's attitude during the interview and of the environment.

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round II Survey of Ghana, 2002

Source: E. Gyimah-Boadi, University of Ghana-Legon. Department of Political Science

Owner: ICPSR 4233

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Codename: afrob-G02

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, markets, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Ghana. Respondents were asked to rate Ghana's President Kufour and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, religious affiliation and participation, language spoken most at home, whether the respondent was head of household, education, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, type of physical disability, if any, type of housing, and respondent's attitude during the interview. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the environment.

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round II Survey of Lesotho, 2003

Source: Thuso Green, Sechaba Consultants

Owner: ICPSR 4417

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Codename: AfroB_2SoL03

Year: 2003

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project assesses attitudes toward democracy, markets, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations. This survey of Lesotho recorded Lesotho citizens' opinions about recent political and economic changes within their country. Respondents were asked about their current satisfaction with economic conditions in Lesotho, how they currently obtained food to eat, what resources they relied on for safety, and how they obtained health care. They were also asked how often in the last 12 months they or their family had gone without food, felt unsafe in terms of crime, gone without medicine, or gone without shelter. Their opinions were elicited on how they compare the past and present in terms of job opportunities, the gap between rich and poor, and the availability of goods, as well as people's living standards. Respondents were also asked how often they obtained news from such sources as radio, television, or newspapers and how closely they followed what was going on in government and public affairs. Other questions involved the respondent's preference for a market- or government-run economy, free schooling versus user fees, privatized agriculture marketing versus government control and more jobs with low wages versus fewer jobs with high wages. Respondents were asked to rate the way the country was handling creating jobs, keeping prices stable, managing the economy, fighting corruption, addressing educational needs, and combating diseases such as malaria and HIV/AIDS. They were also asked if they trusted the prime minister, the National Assembly, the Independent Electoral Commissions, the army, and other governmental and nongovernmental institutions. Demographic information was elicited from respondents, including age, language spoken, education, and employment status.

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round II Survey of Mozambique, 2002

Source: Annie Chickwanha, Institute for Democracy in South Africa (IDASA)

Owner: ICPSR 4277

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Codename: afrob-M02

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, markets, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Mozambique. Respondents were asked to rate Mozambique's President Joaquim Chissano and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources that may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich," monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self- identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, religious affiliation and participation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent was the head of household, education, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, type of physical disability, if any, type of housing, and respondent's attitude during the interview. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the environment.

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Title: Afrobarometer: Round II Survey of Uganda, 2002

Source: Michael Bratton, Michigan State University. Department of Political Science

Owner: ICPSR 4237

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Codename: afrob-U02

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The Afrobarometer project was designed to assess attitudes toward democracy, markets, and civil society in several sub-Saharan African nations, and to track the evolution of such attitudes in those nations over time. This particular survey was concerned with the attitudes and opinions of the citizens of Uganda. Respondents were asked to rate Uganda's President Museveni and his administration's overall performance, to state the most important issues facing the nation, and to evaluate the effectiveness of certain continental and international institutions. Opinions were gathered on the role of the government in improving the economy, whether corruption existed in local and national government, whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, and whether local government officials, the police, the courts, the overall criminal justice system, the media, the National Electoral Commission, and the government broadcasting service could be trusted. Respondents were polled on their knowledge of government officials, their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and the identification of causes of conflict and resources which may aid in the resolution of conflict. Economic questions addressed the past, present, and future of the country's and the respondent's economic condition, and whether great income disparities are fair. Societal questions were asked of respondents concerning the meaning of being "poor" and "rich", monetary support systems, personal responsibility for success or failure, characteristics used in self-identification, methods for securing food, water, schooling, medical services, news and information, and ease of obtaining assistance for certain services. Background variables include age, gender, ethnicity, religious affiliation and participation, language spoken most at home, whether respondent head of household, education, current and past employment status, whether a close friend or relative had died from AIDS, language used in interview, type of physical disability, if any, type of housing, and respondent's attitude during the interview. In addition, demographic information pertaining to the interviewer is provided, as well as their response to the interview and observations of the environment.

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Title: After the JD -- Wave 1: A Longitudinal Study of Legal Careers in Transition Data Collection: May 2002-May 2003, United States

Source: Garth, Bryant G., Southwestern Law School

Owner: ICPSR 26302

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Codename: LSLC0203

Year: May 2002-May 2003

Status: A

Description: The After the JD project is designed to be a longitudinal study, seeking to follow a sample of approximately 10 percent of all the individuals who became lawyers in the year of 2000. It is the largest and most ambitious study ever undertaken by researchers of legal careers aiming to track the professional lives of more than 5,000 lawyers during their first 10 years after law school. Wave 1 of the After the JD study was launched in May 2002. The sample includes new lawyers from 18 legal markets – ranging from the 4 largest markets (New York City, District of Columbia, Chicago, and Los Angeles) to 14 other areas consisting of small metropolitan areas to entire states. More detailed results can be found under: American Bar Foundation Web site. Lawyers’ career trajectories provide a window through which we can analytically examine mobility and movement within the profession, exits from the profession, the effects of educational debt, and job satisfaction within the legal profession. This information is valuable in advising and attracting potential applicants to law school, counseling students while in law school, and working with alumni and practitioners when they join the profession. Some of the topics the study on new lawyers seeks to examine are: (1) Demographic characteristics; (2) financing of legal education; (3) law school and the transition to practice; (4) practice settings within which lawyers work; (5) distribution of income across the profession; (6) dimensions of satisfaction; (7) mobility and turnover. For the most part, the first wave reveals an expected pattern of stratification related to law school attended and grades achieved. The majority of respondents are still working in their first jobs and they are located predominantly in private firms. Many have not yet married and most do not have children yet. In short, the After the JD study aims to create a definitive picture of how the careers of lawyers develop in the early twenty-first century. Building on this first wave, the future work of AJD will employ follow-up questionnaires six and ten years into the respondents’ careers. Respondents were asked to give information concerning their employment status, when they started working for their current employer, organizational type, their position within the organization, and how many hours they were expected to bill during a typical week. Furthermore, they were asked to report the division of time allocated for different types of legal matters as well as the percentages involving specific types of clients. They were queried on the different tasks they completed during the past three months and which of those happened on a recurring basis. Their views were sought on changes they would most like to see in their job. They were queried on the proportion of men and minorities in their workplace. Views were sought on how satisfied they were with a range of facets of their job including level of responsibility, recognition, opportunities for advancement, compensation, relationships with colleagues, intellectual challenge, amount of travel, and job security. They were also asked if they had experienced different forms discrimination in the workplace based on their race, religion, ethnicity, gender, disability, or sexual orientation. Respondents were asked what factors were most important in obtaining their first job after law school, what factors influenced their decision to work in their chosen law setting, and what factors they thought were most important from the organization's view point of making a job offer to them. Information was gathered on respondents participation in a variety of organizations and settings including political parties, PTA and other school organizations, College alumni associations, charitable organizations, gender-based organizations, religious organizations, the American Bar Association, community associations, private clubs, and organized sports leagues. A number of questions were asked about the respondent's educational background including the year they received their undergraduate degree, where they earned their undergraduate degree, their cumulative undergraduate grade point average, undergraduate class rank, undergraduate major, whether they went directly to law school, if not, what they did during the interim, where and when they received their law degree, their cumulative law school grade point average, class rank, and other graduate level degrees they held. Respondents were queried on the importance of various factors in their decision to attend law school and what elements of their law school education and preparation helped most in making the transition to their early work assignments as a lawyer and in their professional career. Demographic variables include employment status, personal income, household income, job history, sex, race, age, political party affiliation, parent's nationality, parent's education, parent's occupation the while respondent was in high school, whether anyone in the respondent's family was a lawyer, marital status, spouses occupation, and number of children that live with the respondent for a significant portion of the year.

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Title: After the JD 2: A Longitudinal Study of Careers in Transition, 2007-2008, United States

Source: Nelson, Robert L., American Bar Foundation and Northwestern University;

Owner: ICPSR 33584

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Codename: LSCT0708

Year: 2007-2008

Status: A

Description: The After the JD (AJD) project is a longitudinal study that is designed to track the careers of a nationally representative cohort of lawyers admitted to the bar in the year 2000. The first wave of the After the JD Study (AJD1) [ICPSR 26302] provided a snapshot of the personal lives and careers of this cohort about three years after they began practicing law. The second wave of the After the JD project (AJD2) seeks to illuminate the progression of lawyers' careers through roughly seven years in practice. The seventh year marks a crucial period in the careers of young lawyers. At the same time that they are facing important career decisions, these young lawyers are experiencing significant personal decisions about marriage and having children. AJD2 sought to locate and survey the entire original sample that was constructed in AJD1, even if a sample member had not been located or surveyed in AJD1. Only those individuals found to be ineligible for the study because they did not meet the required time period for obtaining their law degree and passing the bar were excluded. AJD2 obtained completed surveys of 3,705 eligible respondents, which includes 70.4 percent of the respondents to AJD1 (a group referred to as AJD1 Respondents) and 26.9 percent of those who were not surveyed in wave 1 (a group referred to as AJD1 Nonrespondents). The AJD2 data collection effort was launched in 2007 and completed in early 2008, with an overall response rate of 50.6 percent of eligible participants. As the legal profession has become more diverse in terms of entrants, it is critical to understand how women, men and women of color, individuals from less advantaged economic backgrounds, and other traditionally disadvantaged groups build careers. To examine the experiences of these groups at distinctive stages of their professional lives and to compare their career experiences to those of their peers, investigators were able to collect information about whether respondents' experiences were different from the outset or whether career trajectories diverge over time, what career strategies appear most successful for young lawyers, and whether these strategies vary by gender, race, and class; by legal market; by the selectivity of the law school from which lawyers graduate; or other dimensions. The AJD2 dataset allows for the analysis of a broad range of questions about the careers of lawyers and the social organization of the American legal profession. For example, some of the topics the study examines are: (1) demographic characteristics; (2) job mobility; (3) career satisfaction; (4) convergence/divergence in the career patterns of women and minorities; (5) indications of continuing inequality by gender; (6) family formation and the effects on professional careers; (7) career trajectories. AJD2 aims to provide a solid basis for future efforts to understand the changing character of legal careers. The final phase of the AJD2 data collection ended before the onslaught of the global financial crisis in the fall of 2008. Consequently, the data do not account for the profound effects of these turbulent events. The third wave of the study (AJD3) anticipates investigating these issues and many other similarly important transitions.

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Title: After the JD, Wave 3: A Longitudinal Study of Careers in Transition, 2012-2013, United States

Source: Nelson, Robert, American Bar Foundation; Dinovitzer, Ronit, American Bar Foundation; Plickert, Gabriele, American Bar Foundation; Sterling, Joyce, University of Denver.

Owner: ICPSR 35480

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Codename: LSCT1213

Year: 2012-2013

Status: A

Description: The After the JD (AJD) project is a longitudinal study that was designed to track the careers of a nationally representative cohort of lawyers admitted to the bar in the year 2000. This collection is the third wave of the After the JD Project. The first wave of the After the JD project (AJD1) [ICPSR 26302] provided a snapshot of the personal lives and careers of this cohort about three years after they began practicing law. The second wave of the After the JD project (AJD2) [ICPSR 33584] sought to illuminate the progression of lawyers' careers through roughly seven years in practice. The third wave (AJD3) continued to shed light on lawyers' 12-year professional and personal pathways. After 12 years, the AJD lawyers had a decade of work experience behind them, and the contours of their careers were more clearly shaped. Throughout their professional careers, these lawyers had experienced important transitions (such as promotion to partnership, marriage, and job changes), which were only in process by Wave 2. AJD3 marked a significant milestone, essential to assess the personal and career trajectories of this cohort of lawyers. AJD3 sought to locate and survey only individuals who had previously responded to either AJD1 or AJD2. Sample members who never responded to any survey wave were not located in AJD3. The AJD3 data collection started in May 2012 and was completed in early 2013. The dataset allowed for the analysis of a broad range of questions about the careers of lawyers and the social organization of the American legal profession. Topics covered include current professional employment, impact of economic downturn, type of work, clients, mentors, employment history, social, political, and community participation, and background and family information. Demographics include ethnicity, employment status, sexuality, marital status, age, and gender.

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Title: Age and Generations Study, 2007-2008

Source: Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie, Boston College; Smyer, Michael, Bucknell University

Owner: ICPSR 34837

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Codename: AGS08

Year: 2007-2008

Status: A

Description: The Age and Generations Study documented employee and employer outcomes related to the experiences of multi-generational teams in five industry sectors, and examined how the work relationships of these team members might change over time. The five industry sectors included in this collection were retail, pharmaceuticals, finance, health care, and higher education. Various questions focused on the organization and on how the interactions of multi-generational work units affected outcomes for employees in the department/unit, as well as their performance and productivity outcomes. Additionally, the survey requested information on employees' perceptions of their work experience, work that is done by their work groups, opportunities for learning and development, organizational policies, and their assessments of their health and well-being. Demographic variables included gender, birth year, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, number of children, hourly wage, salary, and household income.

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Title: Aggregate Data Bank and Indices of Brazil: 1940-1960

Source: Brazil, Schitter, Philippe

Owner: ICPSR 0058

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Codename: ADBIB4060

Year:  

Status: A

Description: Data for the aggregate data bank were obtained from several Brazilian and Recenseamento General de Brasil. The data bank cover three times periods--1940, 1050, 1960-- for 22 states of Brazil. For each of the three time periods, data give total population, rural employment and industrial and commercial employment. Literate population, eligible electorate, and actual voting electorate are also available in the dataset. The data ascertain numbers of industrial and commercial establishments as well as membership in various unions, in art and literary associations, in sports organizations, and in Roman Catholic religious organizations. The data were gathered by Philippe Shmitter and were obtained by the ICPSR from the International Data Library and Reference Service, Survey Research Center, the University of California at Berkeley. There are 22 cases, 10 cards of data per case, and approximately 85 variable in this file.

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Title: Aggregate Dynamics of Campaigns

Source: Box-Steffensmeier, Janet M.

Owner: ICPSR 26901

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Codename: ADC

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: Daily interactions between partisan elites, the media, and citizens are the driving dynamic of election campaigns and the central determinant of their outcomes. Accordingly, we develop a theory of campaign dynamics that departs from previous top-down models of campaign effects in its emphasis on the reciprocal campaign interactions between these actors. We examine these interactions with daily data on campaign expenditures, media coverage, and voter support in the 2000 presidential campaign. We find that partisan elites, the media, and citizens each played critical and interdependent roles in creating the dynamics of the campaign and producing the closest election in decades. We also find that the Gore campaign was hindered by its delayed responsiveness to the Bush campaign and its unwillingness to reinforce positive media coverage of Gore with increased campaign expenditures.

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Title: American Citizen Participation Study, 1990

Source: Verba, Sidney, Kay Lehman Schlozman, Henry E. Brady, and Norman Nie

Owner: ICPSR 6635

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Codename: ACPS90

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This study was designed to examine political and nonpolitical civic participation in the United States. Respondents were asked to comment on various topics, including their interest in politics and their party identification, voting status, and activity in community politics. In addition, respondents were asked about their campaign activities, including the kind of work they had done, and how much money and time they had contributed to campaigns for various elections. Respondents also provided information about their own personal experiences with government programs, as well as their opinions on national and social problems in the United States and why people in the United States aren't more active in politics. Demographic variables measured in this study include respondent's educational background, occupation, church activity and religious affiliation, race and ethnicity, age, gender, and union membership.

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Title: American College Catalog Study Database, 1975-2011

Source: Brint, Steven, University of California-Riverside

Owner: ICPSR 34851

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Codename: ACCSD11

Year: 1975-2011

Status: A

Description: The American College Catalog Study Database (CCS) contains academic data on 286 four-year colleges and universities in the United States. CCS is one of two databases produced by the Colleges and Universities 2000 project based at the University of California-Riverside. The CCS database comprises a sampled subset of institutions from the related Institutional Data Archive (IDA) on American Higher Education (ICPSR 34874). Coding for CCS was based on college catalogs obtained from College Source, Inc. The data are organized in a panel design, with measurements taken at five-year intervals: academic years 1975-76, 1980-81, 1985-86, 1990-91, 1995-96, 2000-01, 2005-06, and 2010-11. The database is based on information reported in each institution's college catalog, and includes data regarding changes in major academic units (schools and colleges), departments, interdisciplinary programs, and general education requirements. For schools and departments, changes in structure were coded, including new units, name changes, splits in units, units moved to new schools, reconstituted units, consolidated units, departments reduced to program status, and eliminated units.

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Title: American Housing Survey 2007: Metropolitan Survey

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 24501

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Codename: AHS07ms

Year: 2007

Status: A

Description: The metropolitan survey is conducted in even-numbered years, cycling through a set of 41 metropolitan areas, surveying each one about once every 6 years. This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a metropolitan sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. The data are presented in seven separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Addition to the House), Part 2, Journey to Work Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, and Part 7, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 1987: MSA File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 9380

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Codename: AHS87_MSA

Year: 1987

Status:  A

Description: This data collection provides information on characteristics of housing units in 11 selected Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) of the United States. Although the unit of analysis is the housing unit rather than its occupants, the survey also is a comprehensive source of information on the demographic characteristics of household residents. Data collected include general housing characteristics such as the year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Data are also provided on kitchen and plumbing facilities, type of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, and heating and air-conditioning equipment. Questions about housing quality include condition of walls and floors, adequacy of heat in winter, availability of electrical outlets in rooms, basement and roof water leakage, and exterminator service for mice and rats. Data related to housing expenses include mortgage or rent payments, utility costs, fuel costs, property insurance costs, real estate taxes, and garbage collection fees. Questions are also asked about neighborhood conditions such as quality of roads, and presence of crime, trash, litter, street noise, abandoned structures, commercial activity, and odors or smoke, as well as about the adequacy of such services as public transportation, schools, shopping facilities, police protection, recreation facilities, and hospitals or clinics. In addition to housing characteristics, data on age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder are provided for each household member. Additional data are supplied for the householder, including years of school completed, Spanish origin, and length of residence.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 1987: National File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 9690

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Codename: AHS87_NF

Year: 1987

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units. Data include the year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by recent movers. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are also supplied. For housing quality, indicators include variables such as privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, indicators include exterminator service, boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data are provided on the householder, including years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 1993: National File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 6650

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Codename: AHS93_NF

Year: 1993

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who have recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of an exterminator service, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 1994: MSA Core and Supplement File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 6954

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Codename: ahs94msa

Year: 1994

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on characteristics of housing units in eight selected Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) of the United States. Data for each household member include age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to the householder. For the householder, data also include tenure, length of residence, years of school completed, and Spanish origin. Variables pertaining to general housing characteristics cover number of rooms, type of heating and air-conditioning equipment, and whether the housing units had complete kitchens and plumbing facilities. Information on costs incurred for mortgage payments, rent, real estate taxes, property insurance, utilities, parking, and garbage collection permits comparisons of housing costs from one year to another between geographic areas. Limited data are provided on costs of additions, alterations, replacements, and repairs made to the property.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 1995: National File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 2188

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Codename: AHS95NF

Year: 1995

Status:  

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Ncases: 55,000


Title: American Housing Survey, 1996: MSA Core and Supplement File

Source: US Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 2369

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Codename: ahs96msa

Year: 1996

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of the housing inventory in nine selected Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, presence of commercial or medical establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, type of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, and heating and air conditioning equipment. Data concerned with housing quality describe the condition of the walls and floors, adequacy of heat in the winter, information on heating equipment breakdowns, availability of room electrical outlets, concealed wiring, and basement and roof water leakage. Data relating to housing expenses include mortgage or monthly rent payments, utility costs, and fuel and garbage collection fees. Information solicited from respondents who moved recently included the characteristics of the previous unit and reasons for moving. Other data indicate the presence of and objection to neighborhood conditions such as street noise, crime, litter, commercial activity, and institutional industrial activity, as well as the availability of public transportation, schools, shopping facilities, police, and hospitals. Information on condominiums covers amount and frequency of mortgage payment, amount of property insurance, real estate tax, utility costs, and condominium fees. In addition to housing characteristics, data for each household member are available on age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data on years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and tenure are provided for the householder. Income sources identified in the data include wages, rent, dividends, Social Security, unemployment and workmen's compensation, government and private pensions, and alimony and child support. 5/9/2002.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 1997: National Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 2912

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Codename: ahs97

Year: 1997

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. Unlike previous years, the data are presented in nine separate files with corresponding SAS datasets: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Additions to the House), Part 2, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Part 3, Worker Record, Part 4, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Mover Group Record, Part 8, Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Part 9, Weights. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 2001: National Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4588

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Codename: AHS01n

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. Unlike previous years, the data are presented in eight separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Additions to the House), Part 2, Worker Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Ratio Verification, and Part 8, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are also supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 2002: Metropolitan Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4589

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Codename: AHS02m

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The metropolitan survey is conducted in even-numbered years, cycling through a set of 41 metropolitan areas, surveying each one about once every six years. This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a metropolitan sample of housing units including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. The data are presented in eight separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Addition to the House), Part 2, Worker Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Ratio Verification, and Part 8, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 2003: National Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4591

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Codename: AHS03n

Year: 2003

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. Unlike previous years, the data are presented in eight separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Additions to the House), Part 2, Worker Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Ratio Verification, and Part 8, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 2004: Metropolitan Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4592

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Codename: AHS04m

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: The metropolitan survey is conducted in even-numbered years, cycling through a set of 41 metropolitan areas, surveying each one about once every six years. This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a metropolitan sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. The data are presented in eight separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Addition to the House), Part 2, Worker Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Ratio Verification, and Part 8, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 2005: National Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4593

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Codename: AHS05n

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. Unlike previous years, the data are presented in eight separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Additions to the House), Part 2, Worker Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Ratio Verification, and Part 8, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American Housing Survey, 2007: National Microdata

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 23563

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Codename: AHS07n

Year: 2007

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on the characteristics of a national sample of housing units, including apartments, single-family homes, mobile homes, and vacant housing units. Unlike previous years, the data are presented in seven separate parts: Part 1, Work Done Record (Replacement or Additions to the House), Part 2, Journey to Work Record, Part 3, Mortgages (Owners Only), Part 4, Housing Unit Record (Main Record), Recodes (One Record per Housing Unit), and Weights, Part 5, Manager and Owner Record (Renters Only), Part 6, Person Record, Part 7, Mover Group Record. Data include year the structure was built, type and number of living quarters, occupancy status, access, number of rooms, presence of commercial establishments on the property, and property value. Additional data focus on kitchen and plumbing facilities, types of heating fuel used, source of water, sewage disposal, heating and air-conditioning equipment, and major additions, alterations, or repairs to the property. Information provided on housing expenses includes monthly mortgage or rent payments, cost of services such as utilities, garbage collection, and property insurance, and amount of real estate taxes paid in the previous year. Also included is information on whether the household received government assistance to help pay heating or cooling costs or for other energy-related services. Similar data are provided for housing units previously occupied by respondents who had recently moved. Additionally, indicators of housing and neighborhood quality are supplied. Housing quality variables include privacy of bedrooms, condition of kitchen facilities, basement or roof leakage, breakdowns of plumbing facilities and equipment, and overall opinion of the structure. For quality of neighborhood, variables include use of exterminator services, existence of boarded-up buildings, and overall quality of the neighborhood. In addition to housing characteristics, some demographic data are provided on household members, such as age, sex, race, marital status, income, and relationship to householder. Additional data provided on the householder include years of school completed, Spanish origin, length of residence, and length of occupancy.

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Title: American National Election Studies (ANES) Panel Recontact Study, 2010

Source: American National Election Studies

Owner: ICPSR 30721

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Codename: ANES2010P

Year: 2010

Status: A

Description: The ANES 2010 Panel Recontact Study is a reinterview of the ANES 2008-2009 Panel Study panelists. Those who previously completed at least one ANES wave of the Panel Study before November 2008 and who also completed the November 2008 (post-election) wave were invited to complete a follow-up interview in June 2010. Data collection ended in July 2010. The study was conducted entirely on the Internet from a sample selected and recruited by telephone. It represents United States citizens aged 18 years or older as of election day in November 2008. The questions on the recontact survey covered numerous topics. Many questions were previously asked on earlier waves of the ANES 2008-2009 Panel Study. Topics included interest in politics, cosmopolitanism, efficacy, trust in government, divided government, attitudes toward parties, personality, economic peril, race discrimination, numerous policy attitudes, and income inequality. See the questionnaire in the user guide for question wording. Demographic variables include respondent income, political party affiliation, religiosity, employment status, and household income.

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Title: American National Election Studies (ANES) Panel Study, 2008-2009

Source: American National Election Studies

Owner: ICPSR 29182

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Codename: ANES0809P

Year: 2008-2009

Status: A

Description: The 2008-2009 ANES Panel Study is a telephone-recruited Internet panel with two cohorts recruited using nearly identical methods. The first cohort was recruited in late 2007 using random-digit-dialing (RDD) methods common to telephone surveys. Prospective respondents were offered $10 per month to complete surveys on the Internet each month for 21 months, from January 2008 through September 2009. Those without a computer and Internet service were offered a free web appliance, MSN TV 2, and free Internet service for the duration of the study. The second cohort was recruited the same way in the summer of 2008 and asked to join the panel beginning in September 2008. The recruitment interview was conducted by telephone in nearly all cases. A small number of respondents completed the recruitment survey on the Internet after failing to complete a telephone interview. Before the first monthly survey, most respondents also completed an online profile survey consisting primarily of demographic questions. To minimize panel attrition and conditioning effects, only 7 of the 21 monthly surveys are about politics. Other surveys are about a variety of non-political topics. The panelists answered political questions prepared by ANES in January, February, June, September, October, and November 2008. With certainty, the panel answered more political questions in May 2009. Note that the 2008-2009 ANES Panel Study is entirely separate from the 2008 ANES Time Series study, which was conducted using the traditional ANES method of face-to-face interviews before and after the 2008 election. Although there are a few questions common to both studies, the samples and methods are different. For further details, see the User Guide. Complete documentation is available on the ANES Web site.

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Title: American National Election Studies Cumulative Data File, 1948-2004

Source: Virginia Sapiro, University of Michigan. Center for Political Studies

Owner: ICPSR 8475

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Codename: ANES1948-2004

Year: 1948-2004

Status: A

Description: This collection pools common variables from each of the biennial National Election Studies conducted since 1948. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The data provided in this cumulative file include a series of demographic variables and measures of social structure, partisanship, candidate evaluation, retrospective and incumbent presidential evaluation, public opinion, ideological support for the political system, mass media usage, and equalitarianism and post-materialism. Additional items provide measures of political activity, participation, and involvement, and voting behavior and registration (including results of vote validation efforts). In 2001, corrections were made to variables VCF0902, VCF0904, and VCF0905.

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Title: American National Election Studies: 2006 ANES Pilot Study

Source: Jon A. Krosnick, Stanford University; Arthur Lupia, University of Michigan

Owner: ICPSR 21440

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Codename: ANES06_PS

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: In the fall of 2006 the American National Election Studies (ANES) carried out a pilot study after the 2006 mid-term elections in the United States. The 2006 ANES Pilot Study was conducted for the purpose of testing new questions and conducting methodological research to inform the design of future ANES studies. As such, it is not considered part of the ANES time series that has been conducted since 1948, and the pilot study only includes time series questions necessary to evaluate the new content. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This full release dataset contains all 675 interviews, with the survey portion of the interview lasting just over 37 minutes on average. The study had a re-interview rate of 56.25 percent. Respondents were asked questions over a variety of topics. They were queried on need for closure in various situations including unpredictable ones, how fast important decisions were made, and how often they could see that both people can be right when in disagreement. Respondents were asked many questions pertaining to their values. Some questions dealt with optimism and pessimism. Respondents were asked if they felt that were generally optimistic, pessimistic, or neither in regard to the future. They were asked specifically how they felt about the future of the United States. Respondents were also asked about their social networks, about who they talked to in the last six months, and how close they felt to them. Respondents were further queried about how many days in the last six months they talked to these people, their political views, interest in politics, and the amount of time it would take to drive to their homes. Other questions sought respondents' political attitudes including attentiveness to following politics, ambivalence, efficacy, and trust in government. Respondents were asked questions related to the media such as how much time and how many days during a typical week they watched or read news on the Internet, newspaper, radio, or television. Questions that dealt with abortion consisted of giving respondents various scenarios and asking if they favored or opposed it being legal for the women to have an abortion in that circumstance. The issue of justice was also included by asking respondents what percent of people of different backgrounds who are suspected of committing a crime in America are treated fairly. Respondents were also asked to give their opinion on gender in politics, specifically, whether gender played a role in how the respondent would vote for various political offices. Respondents were also queried on whether they would vote for Bill Clinton or George W. Bush and whether they had voted in the elections in November. Respondents were also asked if they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, the way he was handling relations with foreign countries, and the way he was dealing with terrorism. Respondents were also asked how upsetting the thought of their own death was, and how likely it was that a majority of all people on Earth would die at once during the next 100 years because of a single event. Demographic variables include age, party affiliation, sex, religious preference, and political party affiliation.

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Title: American National Election Studies: Evaluations of Government and Society Study 1 (EGSS 1), 2010-2012 (ICPSR 32701)

Source: Segura, Gary, Stanford University; Jackman, Simon, Stanford University; Hutchings, Vincent, University of Michigan; American National Election Studies

Owner: ICPSR 32701

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Codename: ANESegss1

Year: 2010-2012

Status: A

Description: The American National Election Studies: Evaluations of Government and Society Study 1 (EGSS 1), 2010-2012, is a series of relatively small, short, cross-sectional studies of the American electorate. Its chief aims are to measure public opinion well in advance of the 2012 election and to pilot test new instrumentation. Survey questions for the EGSS mainly come from the public proposal process on the American National Election Studies Online Commons. Topics include vote choice, Tea Party support, interest in politics, attitudes toward political parties, candidates, and Obama, political participation and knowledge, tax policy, racial attitudes, and the war in Afghanistan. Data collection is on the Internet using nationally representative probability samples. EGSS is not a panel design; different respondents complete each survey. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education, employment status, occupation, household income, household size, household type, marital status, religious preferences, religiosity, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and whether respondent is a citizen of the United States.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1972

Source: Miller, Warren; Miller, Arthur, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 7010

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Codename: ANES72

Year: 1972

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In addition to the usual content, other topics included women's liberation, racial attitudes, economic attitudes, payment of federal income tax, feelings about the quality of life, and various cultural attitudes.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1974

Source: Miller, Warren, Arthur Miller, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 7355

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Codename: anes74

Year: 1974

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Content areas covered include TV and newspaper use patterns, respondents' perceptions of issues raised in the media, and the importance of current political issues and personalities, including Watergate and the Nixon resignation and pardon. Date added: 4/25/2002

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Title: American National Election Study, 1984

Source: Miller, Warren E. and the National Election Studies, Center for Political Studie

Owner: ICPSR 8298

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Codename: NES84

Year: 1984

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Part 1 of this collection contains the traditional Pre- and Post-Election Survey (ICPSR Version). Interviews were conducted in-person prior to the 1984 election, and in the post-election wave, half of the respondents were randomly assigned to be reinterviewed in person, and the other half to be reinterviewed by telephone using a shortened version of the questionnaire. In addition to the standard core questions, new topic areas (most of which had been piloted in 1983) included economic individualism and egalitarian items, and group identification items. Vote validation data also are provided. Continuous Monitoring, January 11, 1984 through December 31, 1984 (Part 3) was designed to examine the impact of the election campaign on voters' perceptions, beliefs, and preferences. Respondents were questioned about their knowledge of the candidates' stand on the issues, about their own stand on the issues, and about their opinions and evaluations of the candidates. Interviews were conducted by telephone throughout the year, with a total of 46 separate cross-section samples selected by a random digit dialing design, and an average of 76 respondents interviewed in each of the 46 sample weeks. Although the survey instrument was very much the same from one sample week to the next, some questions were deleted and others added during the course of the campaign, as issues became more or less relevant. Thirteen versions of the questionnaire were incorporated into this data file. Each telephone number selected in the Continuous Monitoring Study generated a labeled coversheet with an administrative history: number of calls, household composition, final disposition, and so forth. Information from every coversheet generated during the course of the study, including non-interviews, is provided in the Field Administration Data File for Continuous Monitoring (Part 22). The file contains zip codes for working residential telephone numbers (where the selected respondent agreed to give that information), but does not contain respondent interview numbers, so it cannot be merged with the Continuous Monitoring File (Part 3).

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Title: American National Election Study, 1984: 1983 Pilot Study

Source: Miller, Warren E.; National Election Studies/Center for Political Studies

Owner: ICPSR 8178

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Codename: ANES83ps

Year: 1983

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. This pilot was conducted to develop new instrumentation for segments of the 1984 American National Election Study. New items were tested on several topics including economic well-being, group identification, values, political participation, and candidate affect. Telephone interviews were conducted in July, with reinterviews in August.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1986

Source: Miller, Warren E. and the National Election Studies/Center for Political Studies

Owner: ICPSR 8678

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Codename: anes86

Year: 1986

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In addition to core items, new content includes questions on values, political knowledge, and attitudes on racial policy, as well as more general attitudes conceptualized as antecedent to these opinions on racial issues. The file also contains vote validation data that were expanded to include information from the appropriate election office and were attached to the records of each of the respondents in the post-election survey. The expanded data consist of the respondent's post case ID, vote validation ID, and two variables to clarify the distinction between the office of registration and the office associated with the respondent's sample address. Date added: 1/25/2002.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1992: Pre- and Post- Election Study

Source:  Miller, Warren E., and the National Election Studies

Owner: ICPSR 8713

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Codename: ANES92

Year: 1992

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The content of the 1992 Election Study reflects its double duty, both as the traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a panel study. The substantive themes represented in the 1992 questionaires include: interest in the 1992 campaignes, information about politics, evaluation of the presidential candidates an dplacement of presidential candidates on various issues, political participation, vote choice for president, personal and national economic well-being, positions of social welfare, racial and ethnic stereotypes, political predispositions, detailed demographic information and religiosity.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1994: Post-Election Survey [Enhanced with 1992 and 1993 Data]

Source: Steven J. Rosenstone; Donald R. Kinder

Owner: ICPSR 6507

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Codename: naes94

Year: 1994

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1994 National Election Study is a post-election interview in which approximately 42 percent of the cases are comprised of empaneled respondents first interviewed in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067) and later in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY: 1992-1993 PANEL STUDY ON SECURING ELECTORAL SUCCESS/1993 PILOT STUDY (ICPSR 6264). The other 58 percent of the cases are a freshly drawn cross-section sample. The panel component of the study is designed to exploit the special features of the 1992-1994 elections: a minority president struggling to forge a majority coalition in the face of a strong third-party challenge, and the replacement in 1992 of fully one-quarter of the House of Representatives. Coming at the end of this period, the 1994 National Election Study provides insights into how electoral coalitions form and decay, and how members of the House who were newly-elected in 1992 secured -- or did not secure -- their districts. The design themes became especially salient in the aftermath of the November 8 election, when control of the Congress shifted to the Republican Party for the first time since 1952. Survey questions included the now-standard National Election Studies battery of congressional evaluations supplemented by questions on term limits, the respondent's representative's vote on President Bill Clinton's crime bill, and whether the respondent felt that his or her representative cared more about prestige and influence for himself/herself than about solving the problems of the congressional district. The content for the 1994 Election Study reflects its dual purpose, both as the traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as the third wave of a panel study. In addition to the standard demographic items, respondents were asked their positions on the following substantive themes: interest in the campaign, media exposure, presidential performance evaluation, measures of partisanship (party likes/dislikes and party identification), which party would better handle certain public problems, summary evaluations (feeling thermometers) on major political figures and social groups, and recent voting behavior. Respondents were also asked their views on issues such as defense spending, assistance to Blacks, the trade-off between spending and services, health insurance, the role of women, recent proposals to reform welfare, preferences on federal budget allocations, and evaluations of retrospective and prospective national and personal economic trends. They were also queried on the extent of their participation in the campaign and their values regarding egalitarianism, attitudes toward race, school prayer, and abortion.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1996: Pre- And Post-Election Survey;

Source:  Rosenstone, Steven J., Donald R. Kinder, Warren E. Miller, and the National Ele

Owner: ICPSR 6896

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Codename: NES96

Year: 1996

Status:  A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 1996 National Election Study contains both pre- and post-election components. The Pre-Election Survey includes interviews in which approximately 77 percent of the cases are comprised of empaneled respondents first interviewed in either AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1992: PRE- AND POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1990 AND 1991 DATA] (ICPSR 6067) or in AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 1994: POST-ELECTION SURVEY [ENHANCED WITH 1992 AND 1993 DATA] (ICPSR 6507). The other 23 percent of the pre-election cases are a freshly drawn cross-section sample. Of the 1,714 citizens who were interviewed during the pre-election stage, 1,534 (89.5 percent) also participated in the Post-Election Survey (1,197 of these were panel cases and 337 were cross-section). The content of the 1996 Election Study reflects its dual function, both as the traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a panel study. Substantive themes presented in the 1996 questionnaires include interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, information about politics, evaluation of the presidential candidates and placement of presidential candidates on various issue dimensions, partisanship and evaluations of the political parties, knowledge of and evaluation of House candidates, political participation (including turnout in the presidential primaries and in the November general election and other forms of electoral campaign activity), and vote choice for president, the United States House, and the United States Senate, including second choice for president. Additional items focused on perceptions of personal and national economic well-being, positions on social welfare issues (including government health insurance, federal budget priorities, and the role of government in the provision of jobs and a good standard of living), positions on social issues (including abortion, women's roles, prayer in the schools, the rights of homosexuals, and the death penalty), racial and ethnic stereotypes, opinions on affirmative action, attitudes toward immigrants, opinions about the nation's most important problem, political predispositions (including moral traditionalism, political efficacy, egalitarianism, humanitarianism, individualism, and trust in government), social altruism, social connectedness, feeling thermometers on a wide range of political figures and political groups, affinity with various social groups, and detailed demographic information and measures of religious affiliation and religiosity. Several new content areas were also added to this survey, including a core battery of campaign-related items in the pre-election wave to better understand the dynamics of congressional campaigns, several questions related to issue importance and uncertainty both in relation to respondents and to candidates, an eight-minute module of questions developed by a consortium of electoral scholars from 52 polities to facilitate comparative analysis of political attitudes and voting behavior, new issue items in the areas of crime, gun control, and income inequality, new items tapping perceptions of environmental conditions (air quality and the safety of drinking water in the nation and in the respondent's own community), environmental priorities (ranging from global warming to cleaning up lakes and parks), self-placements and placements of candidates and parties on environmental issues (trading off environmental protection against jobs and living standards, and supporting or opposing government environmental regulations on businesses), and the relative effectiveness of national, state, and local governments in dealing with environmental problems. Other new items included several measures of social connectedness and a battery of items on membership and activity in a wide variety of social, political, religious, and civic organizations. New media exposure, reception, and attention items were also introduced, including questions on talk radio, network and television news, and items asking respondents to match news anchors with the networks they work for. Also added was a battery of exposure items for entertainment television programs as an indirect measure of exposure to campaign advertisements, as well as a new open-ended item on recollection of campaign ads and questions on respondent attention to the campaign in various media.

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Title: American National Election Study, 1998: Post-Election Survey

Source: Sapiro, Virginia, Steven J. Rosenstone, and the National Election Studies.

Owner: ICPSR 2684

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Codename: NES98

Year: 1998

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. Substantive themes of the 1998 election study include, among others, knowledge and evaluation of the House candidates and placement of the candidates on various issue dimensions, interest in the political campaigns, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, media use, evaluation of the mass media, vote choice, partisanship, and evaluations of the political parties and the party system. Additional items focused on political participation, political mobilization, evaluations of the president and Congress, the ''Lewinsky affair,'' egalitarianism, moral traditionalism, political trust, political efficacy, ideology, cultural pluralism, and political knowledge. Respondents were also asked about their attitudes toward a wide range of issues, including social policy, race policy, military and foreign policy, immigration, foreign imports, prayer in schools, school vouchers, the environment, the death penalty, women's rights, abortion, and religion and politics, including new measures of explicitly political and religious orientations. Demographic items such as age, sex, nationality, marital status, employment status, occupation, and education were also included.

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Title: American National Election Study, 2000: Pre- and Post-Election Sur

Source: Burns, Nancy, Donald R. Kinder, Steven J. Rosenstone, Virginia Sapiro, and the N

Owner: ICPSR 3131

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Codename: ANES2000

Year: 2001

Status:  

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2000 National Election Study (NES) entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election reinterview. A freshly drawn cross-section of the electorate was taken to yield 1,807 cases. Because the study includes a carefully designed mode experiment, the data represent two presidential studies in 2000, side by side. The core study preserves the past commitment to probability area sampling and face-to-face interviewing: 1,000 respondents were interviewed prior to the election and 694 were reinterviewed face-to-face after the election. Supporting the core study, random-digit dial sampling and telephone interviewing were used: 803 respondents were interviewed by phone prior to the election and 862 respondents were interviewed by phone after the election. As such, the experiment examines the differences between the two modes and provides a preview of what shifting to telephone interviewing will mean for the NES time-series. The content of the 2000 election study reflects its dual purpose as a traditional presidential election year time-series data collection and as a mode study. Many of the substantive themes included in the 2000 questionnaires are a continuation of past topics. Interest in politics and the election was examined through questions regarding interest in the political campaigns, concern about the outcome, attentiveness to the media's coverage of the campaign, and information about politics. Respondents' knowledge of candidates and the political parties was ascertained through questions evaluating the presidential candidates and placement of presidential candidates on various issue dimensions, knowledge of the religious background of the major presidential and vice-presidential candidates, partisanship and evaluations of the political parties, and knowledge of and evaluation of United States House and United States Senate candidates. Respondents were also asked about their political participation (in the November general election and in other forms of electoral campaign activity), and their choice for president, the United States House, and the United States Senate, as well as second choice for president. Respondents were also asked about the Clinton legacy and knowledge of George Bush Sr. and his administration. Additional items focused on respondents' perceptions of personal and national economic well-being, their positions on social welfare issues (including government health insurance, federal budget priorities, and the role of government in the provision of jobs and a good standard of living), campaign finance and preference for divided government, social issues (including gun control, abortion, women's roles, the rights of homosexuals, the death penalty, school vouchers, environmental policy), racial and ethnic stereotypes, affirmative action, attitudes toward immigrants, and views on the nation's most important problem. Respondents' values and political predispositions (including moral traditionalism, political efficacy, egalitarianism, humanitarianism, individualism, and trust in government), views on fairness in elections, satisfaction with democracy, and the value of voting were also assessed. Other questions addressed social altruism, social connectedness, feeling thermometers on a wide range of political figures and political groups, affinity with various social groups, and detailed demographic information and measures of religious affiliation and religiosity. Several new concepts were also addressed in the 2000 study and include measures of social trust derived from perceptions of the trustworthiness of neighbors and coworkers. Voter turnout was also investigated with expanded response categories to help respondents be more accurate in determining whether they did in fact vote in November 2000. The concept of political knowledge was also addressed with new instructions encouraging respondents to take their best guesses when answering the political knowledge questions. The 2000 study also incorporated a social network battery, based entirely on the perceptions of survey respondents regarding the characteristics of their identified discussants. Two brief but reliable measures of cognitive style, the need for cognition and the need to evaluate, were also included in this study. Another important feature of the 2000 NES is the mode experiment, which supplies the ability to compare interviews taken in person with interviews taken over the phone. This carefully designed mode experiment, driven by theoretical and practical interest, allows scholars to test the consequences of survey mode on data quality and reliability. The 2000 study incorporates numerous experiments that examine the effects of mode: 7 point scales and branching, response order, "don't know" filters, and social desirability. Demographic variables include gender, race, employment status, and length of residency in the community. DATE ADDED: 11-01-2001

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Title: American National Election Study, 2002: Pre- and Post-Election Survey

Source: Nancy Burns, Donald R. Kinder, University of Michigan. Center for Political Studies

Owner: ICPSR 3740

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Codename: ANES2002

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2002 American National Election Study (ANES) is the first mid-year study to include a pre-election in addition to post-election interview. It is also the first NES study conducted entirely by telephone. Since NES questions are generally designed for face-to-face interviewing, a number of time-series questions were modified to enhance the validity and reliability of data obtained through telephone interviews. Special content for 2002 includes questions on the terrorist attacks of 2001 (and presidential and military response to the attacks), the election contest of 2000, and special modules on economic inequality, specifically gender and racial differences in jobs and income inequality. In a continuation of past topics, respondents were asked about their choice for president, the United States House of Representatives, and the United States Senate. Respondents were also queried about their approval of Bush's handling of the presidency, the economy, and foreign relations. Questions also included feeling thermometers on the United States Congress, the military, the federal government, political figures (George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Al Gore, Joseph Lieberman, Ralph Nader, Bill Clinton, Colin Powell, John Ashcroft, Jesse Jackson, Laura Bush, and Hillary Clinton), and political constituencies (such as Blacks, Whites, conservatives, liberals, big business, people on welfare, Hispanics, Christian fundamentalists, older people, environmentalists, gay men and lesbians, and the news media). The NES 2002 also contained questions on the subject of social trust, such as whether the respondent thought most people would take advantage of you if they had the chance or if they would try to be fair, and whether people try to be helpful or if they are just looking out for themselves. Questions about civic engagement included whether the respondent had worked with other people to deal with an issue facing the community, communicated with a government official to express views, or taken part in a protest, march, or demonstration during the last 12 months. Respondents were asked about political participation, such as whether they registered to vote, had voted, tried to influence how others voted, watched the campaign on television, and whether they were contacted by either major party. Questions about public opinion included whether the government should see to it that every person has a job and a good standard of living and whether the United States should concern itself with world problems. Additional public opinion questions asked whether the respondent thought the economy had gotten better or worse in the past year and whether the respondent was better or worse off financially than he or she was a year ago. A range of questions was posed regarding tax cuts in general and the 2001 tax cuts in particular. Topics also included religious beliefs and participation, pride and shame in being American, and corporate scandals. Demographic variables include age, marital status, education level, employment status, household income, racial/ethnic background, religious preference, home ownership, and length of residency in community. The Auxiliary Data File (Part 2) contains contextual variables for the 2002 National Election Study. Biographical variables for the Democratic and Republican candidates and retiring incumbents include candidate's gender, race, educational background, and committee membership. Incumbent president and party support are also included.

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Title: American National Election Study, 2004: Contextual File

Source: University of Michigan. Center for Political Studies. American National Election Study

Owner: ICPSR 4294

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Codename: ANES2004cf

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: This study is part of the American National Election Study (ANES), a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952, designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, as well as their perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2004 ANES auxiliary file of contextual data was created to provide a core of information for analysts interested in examining or gathering data related to the 2004 general elections in a larger framework, i.e., candidate biographical data, past elections, expenditures, House and Senate member records and ratings, and district and state descriptions. The 436 records represent all United States Congressional Districts (and, for population description, the District of Columbia) and thus may be used with both the 2004 ANES time-series study (AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 2004: TIME-SERIES STUDY [ICPSR 4245]) and the 2004 ANES panel file (AMERICAN NATIONAL ELECTION STUDY, 2004: PANEL FILE [ICPSR 4293]).

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Title: American National Election Study, 2004: Panel Study

Source: University of Michigan. Center for Political Studies. American National Election Study

Owner: ICPSR 4293

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Codename: ANES2004P

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952, designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2004 phase of the panel study was, in large part, made up of questions that captured the likely consequences of the election contest of 2000 and the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, as understood and interpreted by ordinary Americans. This included instrumentation on participation in political and civic life, satisfaction with democratic institutions, support for administration policy, and views on Afghanistan, Iraq, and homeland security.

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Title: American National Election Study, 2004: Pre- and Post-Election Survey

Source: University of Michigan. Center for Political Studies. American National Election Study

Owner: ICPSR 4245

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Codename: ANES2004s

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: This study is part of the American National Election Study (ANES), a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2004 ANES data consists of a time series study conducted both before and after the 2004 presidential election in the United States. It entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election re-interview. A freshly drawn cross section of the electorate was taken, yielding 1,212 cases. Like its predecessors, the 2004 ANES was divided between questions necessary for tracking long-term trends and questions necessary to understand the particular political moment of 2004. The study maintains and extends the ANES time-series 'core' by collecting data on Americans' basic political beliefs, allegiances, and behaviors: aspects of political belief and action so basic to the understanding of politics that they are monitored at every election, no matter the nature of the specific campaign or the broader setting. The study also carried topical and study-specific instrumentation. Questions covering issues prominent in 2004 addressed job outsourcing, private investment of Social Security funds, and President Bush's tax cut. Americans' views on foreign policy, the war on terrorism, and the Iraq War and its consequences were also addressed. In addition, the study carried expanded instrumentation on inflation, immigration, gender politics, and gay and lesbian politics. It also extended the experiment on the measurement of voter turnout that began in 2002. The survey included information on respondent age, education level, political affiliation, race/ethnicity, marital status, and family composition.

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Title: American National Election Study, 2008: Pre- and Post-Election Survey

Source: The American National Election Studies (ANES)

Owner: ICPSR 25383

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Codename: ANES2008

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: This study is part of the American National Election Study (ANES), a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The American National Election Studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predispositions, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. The 2008 ANES data consists of a time series study conducted both before and after the 2008 presidential election in the United States. It entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election re-interview. A freshly drawn cross section of the electorate was taken, yielding 1,212 cases. Like its predecessors, the 2008 ANES was divided between questions necessary for tracking long-term trends and questions necessary to understand the particular political moment of 2004. The study maintains and extends the ANES time-series 'core' by collecting data on Americans' basic political beliefs, allegiances, and behaviors: aspects of political belief and action so basic to the understanding of politics that they are monitored at every election, no matter the nature of the specific campaign or the broader setting. The study also carried topical and study-specific instrumentation. Questions covering issues prominent in 2008 addressed job outsourcing, private investment of Social Security funds, and President Bush's tax cut. Americans' views on foreign policy, the war on terrorism, and the Iraq War and its consequences were also addressed. In addition, the study carried expanded instrumentation on inflation, immigration, gender politics, and gay and lesbian politics. It also extended the experiment on the measurement of voter turnout that began in 2002. Demographic variables include respondent age, education level, political affiliation, race/ethnicity, marital status, and family composition. Additional information about the ANES time series collection can be found on the American National Election Study (ANES) Web site (link).

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Title: American National Election Study. 1992: Pre-and Post-Election Survey

Source:  Millerm Warren E., Donald R. Kinder, Steven J. Rosenstone, and the National Ele

Owner: ICPSR 6067

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Codename: ANES92_EN

Year: 1992

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a time-series collection of national surveys fielded continuously since 1952. The election studies are designed to present data on Americans' social backgrounds, enduring political predisposition, social and political values, perceptions and evaluations of groups and candidates, opinions on questions of public policy, and participation in political life. In addition to the standard or core content items, respondents were asked their positions on social issues such as altruism, abortion, the death penalty, prayer in the schools, the rights of homosexuals, sexual harassment, women's rights, and feminist consciousness. Other substantive themes included racial and ethnic stereotypes, opinions on school integration and affirmative action, attitudes towards immigrants (particularly Hispanics and Asians), opinions on immigration policy and bilingual education, assessments of United States foreign policy goals, and United States involvement in the Persian Gulf War.

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Title: American National Election Study: 1998 Pilot Study

Source: Sapiro, Virginia, Steven J. Rosenstone, and the National Election Studies.

Owner: ICPSR 2963

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Codename: NES98PS

Year: 1998

Status:  

Description: The 1998 Pilot Study focused on examining and improving the methodology used for future studies in the American National Election Studies series. The study provided an opportunity to test new instrumentation, fine-tune measurement of core concepts, and try out some innovative survey methods. The 1998 Pilot Study, conducted September 8 through November 3, 1998, marked the first time a study was conducted during an election season. Three high-profile gubernatorial contests in California, Illinois, and Georgia were used as a basis for testing instrumentation that can only be analyzed in the context of an electoral campaign and for investigating how to improve the election study's capacity to illuminate the impact of campaigns. Among the concepts covered in the study are political interest, knowledge, ideology, efficacy, trust, mobilization, issue attitudes/awareness keyed to actual campaigns, campaign interest, participation in a campaign, media use, candidate awareness, partisanship, vote intention, certainty of vote, and social context and communication. Several additional measures were piloted, including what part of the day the respondent tends to watch television, new social context and communication variables, need for evaluation, group mobilization, public mood, a new affirmative action variable, perceived tone of the campaign, awareness of campaign issues, and whether the respondent owns stock.

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Title: American National Election Study: 2000 Pilot Study

Source: Sapiro, Virginia, Steven J. Rosenstone, and the National Election Studies

Owner: ICPSR 2936

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Codename: NES2000PS

Year: 2000

Status:  

Description: This brief special-topic pilot study focused on a single general topic, trust. Respondents were asked for their opinions on the honesty, respectfulness, courteousness, and general trustworthiness of the neighbors in their communities, their colleagues at work, and politicians. Questions included items on respondents' membership in community organizations and attendance at meetings, whether the respondents worked cooperatively with others on community issues, and whether they had ever contacted government officials regarding community concerns. Politicians were evaluated as to their respect for the citizenry and for their opponents, whether they made campaign promises that they did not intend to keep, and whether politicians would pay more attention to people like the respondent if elections were held more often. One section of the questionnaire asked respondents to gauge how participating in certain activities (attending religious services, following public affairs, voting) and having certain opinions (in favor of further integrating public schools, increasing Social Security spending, instituting term limits for Congress) would shape other people's impressions of them. Demographic variables include gender, race, employment status, and length of residency in the community.

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Title: American National Election Study: Pooled Senate Election,1988, 1990, 1992

Source: Miller, Warren E., Donald R. Kinder, Steven J. Rosenstone, and the National Ele

Owner: ICPSR 9580

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Codename: ANES8892

Year:  

Status: A

Description: This data collection, focusing on Senate elections, combines data from three-part series (1988, 1990, 1992) of Senate studies. Over the course of the three elections, voters in each of the 50 states will be interviewed, and data will be gathered on citizen evaluations of all senators at each stage of their six-year election cycles. Both survey data and contextual data for all 50 states are included. The survey data facilitate the comparison of House of Representatives and Senate races through the use of questions that generally parallel those questions used in election studies since 1978 concerning respondents' interaction with and evaluation of candidates for the House of Representatives. The 50-state survey design also allows for the comparison of respondents' perceptions and evaluation of senators who are up for re-election with those in the second or fourth years of their terms. Topics covered include respondent's recall and like/dislike of House and Senate candidates, issues discussed in the campaigns, contact with House and Senate candidates/incumbents, respondent's opinion of the proper roles for senators and representatives, a limited set of issue questions, liberal/conservative self-placement, party identification, media exposure, and demographic information. Contextual data presented include election returns for the Senate primary and general elections, voting indices for the years 1983-1990, information about the Senate campaign such as election outcome predictions, campaign pollster used, spending patterns, and demographic, geographic, and economic data for the state. Also included are derived measures that reorganize the House of Representatives and Senate variables by party of candidate and incumbency/challenger status of candidate and, for Senate variables only, by proximity to next election. Additionally, a number of analytic variables intended to make analyses more convenient (e.g., Senate class number and whether the respondent voted for the incumbent) are presented. (See data archivist for the information of 1992 survey).

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Title: American Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1994

Source:  Chicago Council On Foreign Relations

Owner: ICPSR 6561

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Codename: APO94

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This study is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the general public and a select group of opinion leaders (or elites) on matters relating to foreign policy and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. Both general public and elite respondents were questioned regarding the biggest problems facing the United States today, spending levels for various federal government programs, the role of Congress in determining foreign policy, the impact of foreign policy on things such as prices and unemployment, and the Clinton Administration's handling of various problems, such as overall foreign policy, overall trade policy, immigration, and relations with Latin America, Japan, Russia, Cuba, Vietnam, and the Middle East. Other topics include government reactions to situations in Bosnia, North Korea, Haiti, Cuba, Rwanda, and the Middle East, the importance of various countries to America's vital interests, possible threats/adversaries to the United States in coming years, NATO and keeping troops in Western Europe, the military role of Japan and Germany, the economic unification of western Europe, the Israeli-Palestinian dispute, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and the illegal drug problem. In addition, the elites were asked several questions about their political party affiliation and the strength of that affiliation. Demographic characteristics such as religious preference, marital status, employment status, household composition, education, age, Hispanic origin, race, sex, and income were gathered for the general population respondents only.

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Title: American Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1990

Source: Chicago Council on Foreign Relations

Owner: ICPSR 9564

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Codename: APO90

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This data collection is the 1990 version of a quadrennial study designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the general public and of a select group of opinion leaders (or elites) on matters relating to foreign policy. The primary objectives of this study were to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision makers must operate and to compare the attitudes of the general public with those of opinion leaders. For the purposes of this study, "opinion leaders" are defined as those who are in positions of leadership in government, academia, business and labor, the media, religious institutions, special interest groups, and private foreign policy organizations. Both general public and elite respondents were questioned regarding the biggest problems/foreign policy problems facing the United States today, spending levels for various federal government programs, the role of Congress in determining foreign policy, the impact of foreign policy on things such as prices and unemployment, economic aid to other nations, military aid/selling military equipment to other nations, the role of the United States in world affairs, the Bush administration's handling of various problems, government reactions to situations in Kuwait, Panama, and China, the importance of various countries to America's vital interests, possible threats/adversaries to the United States in coming years, and the use of United States military troops in other parts of the world. Other topics covered include the relative importance of several foreign policy goals, United States relations with the Soviet Union, Cuba, and Vietnam, NATO and keeping troops in western Europe, the military role of Japan and Germany, the economic unification of western Europe, the Israeli-Palestinian dispute, policy options to reduce dependence on foreign oil, the illegal drug problem, free trade, and the respondent's political party affiliation and the strength of that affiliation. In addition, general populace respondents were asked to indicate their level of political activity, how closely they followed news about several current issues and events, and to rate various foreign countries and American and foreign leaders on a feeling thermometer scale. Demographic characteristics such as religious preference, marital status, employment status, household composition, education, age, Hispanic origin, race, sex, and income also were gathered for these respondents.

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Title: American Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1998

Source: Chicago Council on Foreign Relations.

Owner: ICPSR 2747

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Codename: APOUSFP98

Year: 1998

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the general public and a select group of opinion leaders on matters relating to foreign policy, and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. Through telephone surveys, general public respondents (Part 2) were interviewed October 15-November 10, 1998, and opinion leaders (Part 1) were interviewed November 2-December 21, 1998. Respondents were asked to assess their level of interest in the news and specifically in foreign policy. Respondents were also asked whether concern for foreign policy is important in a presidential candidate, and their views were sought on the foreign policy records of President Bill Clinton and former presidents George Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Richard Nixon, Lyndon Johnson, John F. Kennedy, Dwight Eisenhower, and Harry Truman. Those queried were asked for their opinions on economic aid to foreign nations, including Egypt, Poland, Russia, Israel, and African nations. In addition, respondents were asked to rate the Clinton administration on foreign policy, trade policy, immigration policy, United States relations with China, Japan, and Russia, international terrorism, the situation in the former Yugoslavia, the Arab-Israeli peace process, the situation in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, the situation in Northern Ireland, and the Asian financial crisis. Views were also sought on whether United States' vital interests were present in Egypt, Germany, Japan, Mexico, Israel, Canada, Brazil, Russia, Haiti, Bosnia, Indonesia, Kuwait, Great Britain, Saudi Arabia, China, France, the Baltic nations, South Korea, Poland, South Africa, Taiwan, Cuba, India, Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan. A series of questions addressed potential threats to those vital interests. Additional topics covered the foreign policy goals of the United States, bloodshed in the 21st century, measures to combat international terrorism, the United States' commitment to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), the United States' contributions to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and United States involvement in United Nations peacekeeping operations. Respondents were asked to rate their feelings toward Great Britain, Saudi Arabia, China, France, Taiwan, South Korea, Cuba, Argentina, Pakistan, Nigeria, Turkey, Italy, Russia, North Korea, Germany, Iran, Japan, Mexico, Israel, Iraq, India, Canada, and Brazil. Respondents were also asked for their opinions of President Bill Clinton, Russian President Boris Yeltsin, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, Pope John Paul II, former President George Bush, former President Jimmy Carter, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, South African President Nelson Mandela, European Union President Jacques Santer, Cuban President Fidel Castro, Chinese President Jiang Zemin, British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Palestinian Leader Yasser Arafat, French President Jacques Chirac, and Serbian President Slobodan Milosovic. Further queries focused on whether United States troops should be used if North Korea invaded South Korea, if Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia, if Arab forces invaded Israel, if Russia invaded Poland, if the Cuban people attempted to overthrow the Castro regime, if China invaded Taiwan, or if Serbian forces killed large numbers of ethnic Albanians. Respondents were asked whether they supported the use of economic sanctions against Cuba, Iraq, Iran, North Korea, and China. Additional topics covered the elimination of tariffs, globalization, the establishment of a Palestinian state, the United States' role as a world leader, United States federal government program spending, and whether the United States should pay the $1.6 billion owed to the United Nations. Opinion leaders were asked an additional question about the possible threat of the "euro" (the unified monetary system to be implemented in January 1999 by the European Union) to the United States dollar's supremacy as a reserve currency. Background information on general public respondents includes age, race, sex, political party, political orientation, religion, marital status, spouse's employment status, age of children in household, amount of time spent at home, employment status, occupation, position in household, education, home ownership status, and household income. Background information on opinion leaders includes age, sex, education, political party, and political orientation. DATE ADDED: 04-29-2003.

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Title: American Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy, 2002

Source: Chicago Council on Foreign Relations

Owner: ICPSR 3673

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Codename: APO02

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the general public and a select group of opinion leaders on matters related to foreign policy, and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. Respondents were asked for their opinions regarding the level of funding for federal programs such as aid to education, defense spending, military aid to other countries, gathering intelligence about other countries, homeland security, and the amount of the federal budget that does or should go toward foreign aid, as well as European government funding for defense spending and economic aid to other countries. Respondents were also queried regarding their support for or opposition to economic aid and the types of economic aid the United States gives to countries such as Egypt, Israel, Russia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and African countries. Questions covered United States troop involvement throughout the world, the need for long-term military bases overseas, and the role that Japan and the European Union play as world leaders. The topic of critical threats to the United States was also queried, including the threat from the military power of Russia, economic competition from Japan, Europe, and low-wage countries, the development of China as a world power, Islamic fundamentalism, countries with nuclear capabilities, terrorism and the use of chemical or biological weapons, and conflicts in other parts of the world. Those surveyed were also asked about events that they thought would justify sending United States troops to other parts of the world, including invading Iraq and overthrowing the government of Saddam Hussein. Additional questions on the topic of United States military involvement included combating international terrorism through the use of such measures as air strikes, using ground troops, and assassination of terrorist leaders. Questions sought respondent opinions on possible U.S. foreign policy goals including the protection of weaker nations and helping to improve their standard of living, promoting and defending human rights, combating world hunger, improving the global environment, strengthening the United Nations, reducing the trade deficit, protecting American business interests and promoting market economies abroad, and controlling and reducing illegal immigration and stopping the flow of illegal drugs into the United States. Opinions were also gathered on the United States' participation in treaties to reduce global warming, ban land mines, prohibit nuclear weapon tests, and establish an International Court to try individuals on war crimes. Additional topics were presented only to the general population sample. Respondents' level of interest in the actions of the government was assessed by asking about their level of political activism, whether they had ever written to a public official, and whether they knew who or which party held particular offices. Opinion on the United States military and its role was assessed through questions regarding the sale of military equipment to foreign countries, whether the United States should have military bases overseas, and whether United States troops should get involved in international conflicts. Respondents were also queried on the topics of globalization, trade, and the use of tariffs, as well as internationalism and the role of NATO and the European Union. Those surveyed were asked to rate their feelings toward countries such as Great Britain, Saudi Arabia, China, France, Afghanistan, South Korea, and Brazil among others. Respondents were also asked to similarly rate American and foreign leaders, such as former President Bill Clinton, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Secretary of State Colin Powell, Pope John Paul II, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, Chinese President Jiang Zemin, British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, Palestinian Leader Yasir Arafat, and French President Jacques Chirac, as well as institutions such as the United Nations, the World Bank, the World Trade Organization, the European Union, and the World Court. Background information on general public respondents includes age, race, sex, political party, political orientation, political involvement, religion, marital status, spouse's employment status, age of children in household, amount of time spent at home, employment status, occupation, position in household, education, home ownership status, and household income. Background information on opinion leaders includes age, sex, education, political party, and political orientation.

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Title: American Public Opinion and U.S. Foreign Policy: General Public, 1979

Source: Chicago Council on Foreign Relations

Owner: ICPSR 7748

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Codename: APO79

Year: 1979

Status: A

Description: These data were gathered in personal interviews with a national sample of United States citizens by the Gallup Organization, Inc., to measure attitudes toward foreign affairs in November 1978. Respondents were asked to list the biggest problems facing the country, in general, as well as the biggest foreign policy problems. Other questions explored the relationship between domestic and foreign policy priorities, e.g., aid to education, defense spending, farm subsidies, economic and military aid to other nations, and domestic welfare/reliefprograms. Respondents gave their opinions of what constituted appropriate responses to the growing military power of the United Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR), and they rated the threat that communism presented in several other countries. Respondents were asked to respond favorably or unfavorably to several scenarios in which the use of United States armed forces in other parts of the world could be justified. Respondents were asked to rate the performance of Secretary of State Cyrus Vance and to use a "thermometer" scale to measure their feelings (warm or cold) toward several politicians and world leaders, as well as toward several countries that were important to the United States for political, economic, or security reasons. Opinions were sought about the type of role that various individuals and institutions (e.g., the president, the CIA, the military, the United Nations, and the Congress) should play in the creation of foreign policy. Respondents' political participation was also measured. Demographic information includes age, race, sex, income, sources of information in the media, religion, educational level, occupation, and political orientation. In a similar survey conducted from November 1978 to January 1979, many of the same questions were asked of Americans in senior positions with knowledge of and influence on foreign policy. The results of that survey are collected in AMERICAN PUBLIC OPINION AND U.S. FOREIGN POLICY: NATIONAL LEADERS, 1979 (ICPSR 7786).

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Title: American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2003-2008, Multi-Year Data

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 24943

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Codename: ATUS0308

Year: 2003-2008

Status: A

Description: The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on how people living in the United States spend their time. This multi-year dataset contains data on the amount of time that people spent doing various activities in the years 2003 through 2008, such as paid work, child care, religious activities, volunteering, and socializing. Part 1, Respondent and Activity Summary File, contains demographic information about respondents and a summary of the total amount of time they spent doing each activity that day. Part 2, Roster File, contains information about household members and nonhousehold children under the age of 18. Part 3, Activity File, includes additional information on activities in which respondents participated, including the location of each activity and the total time spent on secondary child care. Part 4, Who File, includes data on who was present during each activity. Part 5, ATUS-CPS File, contains demographic and occupational data on respondents and members of their household collected during their participation in the Current Population Survey (CPS). Demographic variables include sex, age, race, ethnicity, marital status, education level, income, employment status, occupation, citizenship status, country of origin, labor union membership, and household composition.

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Title: American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2006

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 23024

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Codename: ATUS06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on how people living in the United States spend their time. Data collected in this study measured the amount of time that people spent doing various activities in 2006, such as paid work, child care, religious activities, volunteering, and socializing. Respondents were interviewed only once about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were, and whom they were with. An Eating and Health (EH) module was introduced in January 2006, which included questions related to eating, meal preparation, and health, all of which were asked after completion of the ATUS questions. Part 1, Respondent and Activity Summary File, contains demographic information about respondents and a summary of the total number of minutes they spent doing each activity that day. Part 2, Roster File, contains information about household members and nonhousehold children under the age of 18. Part 3, Activity File, includes additional information on activities in which respondents participated, including the location of each activity and the total time spent on secondary child care. Part 4, Who File, includes data on who was present during each activity. Part 5, ATUS-CPS 2006 File, contains data on respondents and members of their household collected during their participation in the Current Population Survey (CPS). Parts 6 and 7 correspond to the 2006 Eating and Health (EH) Module. Parts 8-12 contain supplemental data files that can be used for further analysis of the data. Part 8, Case History File, contains information about the interview process. Part 9, Call History File, gives information about each call attempt. Part 10, Trips File, provides information about the number, duration, and purpose of overnight trips away from home for two or more nights in a row in a given reference month. Parts 11 and 12 contain base weights, replicate base weights, and replicate final weights for each case that was selected to be interviewed for the ATUS. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, ethnicity, education level, income, employment status, occupation, citizenship status, country of origin, and household composition.

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Title: American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2009

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census; United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 30902

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Codename: ATUS09

Year: 2009

Status: A

Description: The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on how people living in the United States spend their time. Data collected in this study measured the amount of time that people spent doing various activities in 2009, such as paid work, child care, religious activities, volunteering, and socializing. Respondents were interviewed only once about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were, and whom they were with. Part 1, Activity File, includes additional information on activities in which respondents participated, including the location of each activity and the total time spent on secondary child care. Part 2, Call History File, gives information about each call attempt. Part 3, Case History File, contains information about the interview process. Part 4, ATUS-CPS 2009 File, contains demographic and occupational data on respondents and members of their household collected during their participation in the Current Population Survey (CPS). Part 5, Respondent File, contains demographic information about respondents. Part 6, Roster File, contains information about household members and non-household children under the age of 18. Part 7, Activity Summary File, contains a summary of the total amount of time they spent doing each activity that day. Part 8, Trips File, provides information about the number, duration, and purpose of overnight trips away from home for two or more nights in a row in a given reference month. Part 9, ATUS 2009 Replicate Weights File, contains base weights, replicate base weights, and replicate final weights for each case that was selected to be interviewed for the ATUS. Part 10, Who File, includes data on who was present during each activity. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, ethnicity, marital status, education level, income, employment status, occupation, citizenship status, country of origin, labor union membership of household members, and household composition.

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Title: American Time Use Survey (ATUS), 2010

Source: United States Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census; United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 30901

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Codename: ATUS10

Year: 2010

Status: A

Description: The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) collects information on how people living in the United States spend their time. Data collected in this study measured the amount of time that people spent doing various activities in 2010, such as paid work, child care, religious activities, volunteering, and socializing. Respondents were interviewed only once about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were, and whom they were with. Part 1, Activity File, includes additional information on activities in which respondents participated, including the location of each activity and the total time spent on secondary child care. Part 2, Call History File, gives information about each call attempt. Part 3, Case History File, contains information about the interview process. Part 4, ATUS-CPS 2010 File, contains demographic and occupational data on respondents and members of their household collected during their participation in the Current Population Survey (CPS). Part 5, Respondent File, contains demographic information about respondents. Part 6, Roster File, contains information about household members and non-household children under the age of 18. Part 7, Activity Summary File, contains a summary of the total amount of time they spent doing each activity that day. Part 8, Trips File, provides information about the number, duration, and purpose of overnight trips away from home for two or more nights in a row in a given reference month. Part 9, ATUS 2010 Replicate Weights File, contains base weights, replicate base weights, and replicate final weights for each case that was selected to be interviewed for the ATUS. Part 10, Who File, includes data on who was present during each activity. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, ethnicity, marital status, education level, income, employment status, occupation, citizenship status, country of origin, labor union membership of household members, and household composition.

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Title: American's Changing Lives: Wave I, 1986

Source: James S. House

Owner: ICPSR 9267

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Codename: ACL86_WI

Year: 1986

Status: A

Description: This study is part of a larger research program designed to investigate 1) the ways in which a wide range of activities and social relationships that people engage in are broadly 'productive', 2) how individuals adapt to acute life events and chronic stresses that threaten the maintenance of health, effective functioning, and productive activity, and 3) sociocultural variations in the nature, meaning, determinants, and consequences of productive activities and relationships. Focusing especially on differences between black and white Americans in middle and late life, these data constitute the first wave in a national longitudinal panel survey covering a wide range of sociological, psychological, mental, and physical health items. Among the topics covered are interpersonal relationships (spouse/partner, children, parents, friends), sources and levels of satisfaction, social interactions and leisure activities, traumatic life events (physical assault, serious illness, divorce, death of a loved one, financial or legal problems), perceptions of retirement, health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight, rest), and utilization of health care (doctor vistirs, hospitalization, nursing home institutionalization, bed days). Also included are measures of physical health, psychological well-being, and indices referring to cognitive functioning. Background information provided for individuals includes household composition, number of children and grandchildren, employment status, occupation and work history, income, family financial situation, religious beliefs and practices, ethnicity, race, education, sex, and region of residence. Class III.

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Title: Americans' Changing Lives: Waves I And II, 1986 And 1989.

Source: House, James S.

Owner: ICPSR 6438

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Codename: ACL86_89

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: This study is part of a larger research program designed to investigate (1) the ways in which a wide range of activities and social relations hips that people engage in are broadly 'productive,' (2) how individuals adapt to acute life events and chronic stresses that threaten the maintenance of health, effective functioning, and productive activity, and (3) sociocultural variations in the nature, meaning, determinants, and consequences of productive activity and relationships. Focusing especially on differences between Black and white Americans in middle and late life, these data constitute both the first and second waves in a national longitudinal panel survey covering a wide range of sociological, psychological, mental, and physical health items. Among the topics covered are interpersonal relationships (spouse/partner, children, parents, friends), sources and levels of satisfaction, social interactions and leisure activities, traumatic life events (physical assault, serious illness, divorce, death of a loved one, financial or legal problems), perceptions of retirement, health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight, rest), and utilization of health care (doctor visits, hospitalization, nursing home institutionalization, bed days). Also included are measures of physical health, psychological well-being, and indices referring to cognitive functioning. Background information provided for individuals includes household composition, number of children and grandchildren, employment status, occupation and work history, income, family financial situation, religious beliefs and practices, ethnicity, race, education, sex, and region of residence.

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Title: An Institutionalization Effect: The Impact of Mental Hospitalization and Imprisonment on Homicide in the United States, 1934 - 2001

Source: Harcourt, Bernard, University of Chicago

Owner: ICPSR 34986

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Codename: AIE3401

Year: 1934 - 2001

Status: A

Description: This data set explored the effect of imprisonment on violent crime rates prior to 1991. Previous research focused exclusively on rates of imprisonment, rather than using a measure that combines institutionalization in both prisons and mental hospitals. Using state-level panel-data regressions over the 68-year period from 1934 to 2001 and controlling for economic conditions, youth population rates, criminal justice enforcement, and demographic factors, this study found a large, robust, and statistically significant relationship between aggregated institutionalization (in mental hospitals and prisons) and homicide rates. This finding provided strong evidence of what should now be called an institutionalization effect -- rather than an imprisonment or incapacitation effect. Demographic information collected include national unemployment rates and institutional race and age composition.

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Title: Annual Survey of Governments 1982: Employment Statistics

Source:  Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 8286

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Codename: ASG82E

Year: 1982

Status: A

Description: Included in the universe of this study are all local governments in the 1982 Census of Governments. This represents approximately 20,000 local governments (including counties, municipalities, townships, school districts,And special districts), plus the governments of all fifty states and the District of Columbia. Data were collected during October of 1982 on full-And part-time employment, full-time equivalent employment, and payroll statistics by type of government and by function. The study is comprised of one file maintaining a logical record length of 3,600 characters. ThereAre 20,725 records and approximately 225 variables. Class IV.

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Title: Annual Survey of Governments, 1986 Employment Statistics

Source:  US Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 8977

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Codename: ASG86E

Year: 1986

Status: A

Description: State and local government employment data are provided in this file. DataAre supplied by type of government and by function and include full- and part-time employment, full-time equivalency, and payroll statistics. Governmental functions include education (elementary, secondary, and higher education), police and fire protection, financial and centralAdministration, judicial and legal, utilities, public welfare, parks and recreation, health care, transit, and natural resources. Class IV.

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Title: Annual Time Series Statistics For The United States, 1929-1968

Source: Douglas A. Norwood, University Of Wisconsin

Owner: ICPSR 0027

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Codename: USATS29-68

Year:  

Status: A

Description: Data contains 280 variables which apply to the entire forty-year period; 127 others apply only to the period 1947 to 1968. The study is a compilation of social, economic, and political time-series indicators. The variables include data on expenditures from the federal budget by various departments, agencies and commissions; measures of the political characteristics of the U.S. Congress; business and consumer expenditures; and various attributes of the population.

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Title: Anti-Semitism in The United States, 1964

Source: Charles Glock, Et Al., Survey Research Center, U of Cal, Berkeley

Owner: Rod Stark, Dept. of Sociology, Universit

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: RANSA

Year: 1964

Status: A

Description: Data consists of an adult sample of 1914 respondents; 336 variables. The study explores respondents' opinions on current affairs and attitudes toward the constitution and individual rights. The respondents' feelings toward minority groups, such as John Birch Society members, communists,And negroes are probed; special emphasis is placed on the Jewish minority. Respondents are asked to state their beliefs about Jews as a group, their contact with Jews and their views about political and social rights of Jews in the U.S. Respondents are also asked to compare Jews with other groups in the U.S. On the basis of ambition, wealth, intelligence and power. Derived measures include an index of Anti-Semitic belief.

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Title: Anti-Semitism in the United States, 1964

Source: Charles Glock

Owner: ICPSR 7310

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Codename: ASUS_64

Year: 1964

Status: A

Description: This nationwide study investigated respondents' opinions on current affairs at both the national and international levels. Issues such as morality in the United States, approval of the United Nations, and the positon of the United States in world affairs were explored, as well as attitudes toward the Constitution and individual rights. Respondents were asked about their feelings toward minority groups such as the John Birch Society, communists, and Blacks, with special emphasis on the Jewish minority. Respondents' beliefs about Jews as a group, their contacts with Jews, and their feelings about political and social rights of Jews in the United States were probed. Past treatment of the Jewish people was also explored, and the respondents were asked to compare Jews with other groups in the United States on the basis of ambition, wealth, intelligence, and power. A number of variables assessed the respondents' leisure activities, their religious beliefs and education, and their outlooks on life. Derived measures include indexes such as anti-Semitic beliefs, Index of Jewish contacts, Fascism Scale, Despair Scale, Tolerance of Cultural Diversity Index, Enlightenment Values Scale, Anomie Scale, Political Anxiety Scale, Self-Image Scale, Libertarian Index, and Monism Scale. Demographic data include sex, race, age, education, income, religion, home ownership, marital status, and number of children. The study was received from the International Data Library and Reference Service, Survey Research Center, University of California at Berkeley.

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Title: Arab Barometer: Public Opinion Survey Conducted in Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, and Yemen, 2010-2011

Source: Jamal, Amaney, Princeton University; Tessler, Mark, University of Michigan;

Owner: ICPSR 35040

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Codename: arabB10

Year: 2010-2011

Status: A

Description: The Arab Barometer is a multicountry social survey designed to assess citizen attitudes about public affairs, governance, and social policy in the Arab world, and to identify factors that shape these attitudes and values. In this second wave of the Arab Barometer, respondents in the countries of Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tunisia, and Yemen were queried regarding (1) general questions, (2) evaluation of political institutions and political attitudes, (3) elections and parliament, (4) the media, (5) democracy, (6) social, religious and cultural topics, and (7) the Arab world and international relations. In Egypt and Tunisia, additional questions were included related to the events of the Arab Spring. In regards to general questions, respondents were asked to give their opinion on the current overall and future economic condition of their countries, the current economic situation of their families, the safety of their locality, and levels of interpersonal trust. On the topic of evaluation of political institutions, political participation, and political attitudes, respondents gave their opinions on how much trust they had in political institutions such as political parties, police, parliament, the courts, and the prime minister. Further, participants were asked about the ease of obtaining services from the government, the present political situation, the performance of their country's current government, problems facing their country, citizen freedoms, corruption and the use of "wasta" (personal influence or connections). Concerning elections and parliament, questions focused on electoral participation, the fairness of elections, and important qualities in a candidate for office. On the subject of the media, questions included the respondent's main source of political information, media bias, media censorship, and use of the internet. Concerning democracy, respondents were asked questions about their opinions on political competition and reform, participation in political dissent, their opinions on the characteristics of democracy, their opinions about various political system, the degree to which, on a given list of countries, each is a democracy, and how suitable democracy is for the respondents' respective countries. Regarding social, religious and cultural topics, respondents gave their views on the lottery, choosing a spouse, the interpretation of Islam in present-day issues, and the behavior and situation of women in Muslim society. Additional queries included the degree to which religion should influence voting in elections, government decisions, and legislation. The final topic for all countries, the Arab world and international affairs, questions were asked about the Arab world lagging behind other regions, the United States' role in the Middle East, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Additionally, in Egypt and Tunisia, respondents were asked about their participation in and views of the events associated with the Arab Spring. Demographic variables include age, gender, education, income, employment status, occupation, marital status, and religious preference and practices.

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Title: Arab-Barometer: Public Opinion Survey Conducted in Algeria, Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Palestine, and Yemen, 2006-2007

Source: Tessler, Mark, University of Michigan; Jamal, Amaney, Princeton University

Owner: ICPSR 26581

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Codename: arabB0607

Year: 2006-2007

Status: A

Description: The Arab-Barometer is a multicountry social survey designed to assess citizen attitudes about public affairs, governance, and social policy in the Arab World, and to identify factors that shape these attitudes and values. In this first round of the Arab-Barometer, respondents in the countries of Jordan, Algeria, Lebanon, Morocco, Kuwait, Yemen, and Palestine were queried regarding (1) economic questions, (2) evaluation of political institutions, political participation, and political attitudes, (3) identity and nationalism, (4) politics and religion, (5) religiosity, and (6) the Arab world and international affairs. In regards to economic questions, respondents were asked to give their opinion on the current overall and future economic condition of their countries, and the current economic situation of their families. On the topic of evaluation of political institutions, political participation, and political attitudes, respondents gave their opinions on how much trust they had in political institutions such as political parties, police, parliament, the courts, and the prime minister, their involvement in organizations, whether people can be trusted, city safety, election participation, and the fairness of elections. Further, participants were asked about the ease of obtaining services from the government, the present political situation, their political interest and main source of political information, and their support of the government. Other questions asked their opinions on political competition and reform, participation in political dissent, their opinions on the characteristics of democracy, the degree to which, on a given list of countries, each is a democracy, and how suitable democracy is for the respondents' respective countries. The remaining questions asked respondents for their opinions of various political systems, the performance of their country's current government, problems facing their country, citizen freedoms, corruption, and qualifications for national leadership. Concerning identity and nationalism, respondents were asked how they view themselves, what affiliations were most important, which groups they wished to have as neighbors, what they thought of emigration, and pride in their country. On the subject of politics and religion, queries included the degree to which religion should influence voting in elections, government decisions, and legislation. Regarding religiosity, respondents gave their views on the lottery, choosing a spouse, the interpretation of Islam in present-day issues, the behavior and situation of women in Muslim society, and a person's qualifications for a government job. The final topic, the Arab world and international affairs, questions were asked about the Arab world lagging behind other regions, the effectiveness of the Arab League, whether certain events were part of terrorist operations, the United States' role in the Middle East, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Additional topics include internet use, time spent in Western countries, and citizen disputes and the use of "wasta" (personal influence or connections). Demographic variables include age, gender, education, employment status, occupation, marital status, religious preference and practices, individual and family income, and country of origin.

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Title: Asia Europe Survey (ASES): A Multinational Comparative Study in 18 Countries, 2001

Source: Takashi Inoguchi, Chuo University

Owner: ICPSR 22324

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Codename: ASES-mcs01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: The purpose of the survey was to study, in 18 countries of Asia and Europe, how democracy (or quasi-democracy) functions in response to various domestic and international stimuli, with a focus on the rise of civil society and the deepening of globalization. The 18 countries surveyed include from East and Southeast Asia: Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines, and from Western Europe: the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Germany, Sweden, Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Greece. The questionnaire covers generally five topics: (1) identity, (2) trust, (3) satisfaction, (4) beliefs and actions, and (5) socio-economic attributes. For the first topic, the survey asked respondents for their nationality and its importance to them, whether it was respected by others and given fair treatment in international economic and political affairs, and how proud of it they were. Respondents were also asked how important it was for them to have citizenship, fluency in their country's dominant language, and to practice their nationality's dominant religion. Respondents were asked if they identified with a community or a group rather than a nationality (i.e. neighborhoods, ethnic group, and religion), if they belonged to larger groups in which people from other countries were included (i.e. European, Asian, and Islamic), and how proud they were of their country's achievements or politics. The next topic asked respondents to assess their level of confidence in their country's government and endeavors (i.e. political parties, law and courts, and mass media) and in international organizations (i.e. World Bank and NATO), to name their country's foreign ministers, and if they could name the five countries with permanent seats on the United Nations Security Council. For the third topic, respondents were asked how well their countries handled issues of politics and citizens, about their personal life situation, their country's development, and the international situation. Regarding beliefs and actions, respondents were asked to comment on the effects of development around the world (i.e., products, money, people, and information being able to move globally), the importance of social issues (i.e., human rights and unemployment), and whether such issues should be dealt with by the country alone or by all countries working together, and if they agreed with specific statements others have made about the government, economy, and politics. They were questioned about their interest in politics, their left-to-right stance in politics, what political activities they had participated in, whether they had voted in the presidential and/or local elections, which political party they felt closest to, and their level of satisfaction with politics in their society. The final topic included questions on the respondent's awareness of political or governmental affairs through different types of media (i.e., newspaper, radio, and television), life satisfaction, fluency in English, frequency with which they attended religious services, religious domination, sex, age, living situation, highest completed level of education, employment, household's living standards, income, and ethnic group.

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Title: AsiaBarometer, 2003

Source: University of Tokyo. Institute of Oriental Culture

Owner: ICPSR 4300

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Codename: AsiaB2003

Year: 2003

Status: A

Description: The AsiaBarometer, 2003 represents a cross-national effort to study the lives of the peoples of East, Southeast, South, and Central Asia on physical, psychological, and sociological dimensions. The project was designed to capture the extent to which respondents experience the affective and cognitive qualities of life, focusing on their assessments of their own lives as well as their relationships to family, neighborhood, workplace, social institutions, political institutions, and the marketplace. Attitudes toward development, democracy, and regionalization were examined, as were the types of goods and services desired and consumer habits. Respondents were queried on their overall personal satisfaction as well as their satisfaction with their friendships, family life, marriage, standard of living, housing, household income, health, education, neighbors, job, leisure time, public safety, the condition of the environment, the social welfare system, and the political system. Data were gathered on the respondents' personal priorities and those they had for their children, as well as their level of trust in others, their inclination to help others, and what characteristics and affiliations they used to identify themselves. Respondents were asked to rate the efficacy of their national governments in handling the economy, political corruption, human rights, unemployment, crime, public services, immigration, ethnic conflict, religious conflict, and environmental problems. Additional questions asked whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, what type of political systems respondents favored, and the extent to which the national government, the local government, the army, the legal system, the police, the national legislative branch (e.g., Parliament, Congress), the public education system, large domestic companies, multinational companies, trade/labor unions, the media, and other nongovernmental organizations (e.g., environmental, social advocacy groups, nonprofit organizations) could be trusted to operate in the best interest of society. Participants were asked which macro-socioeconomic issues they were most concerned with and what matters they believed the government should spend more or less on. Respondents were polled on their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and their perspectives on the importance of political and electoral participation. Additional questions addressed respondent exposure to and opinions of foreign companies, peoples, governments, and cultures. Market analysis inquiries included what products respondents owned, planned to own in the near future, or desired to own, as well as what consumer services they had used or would like to use. Respondents were asked about their modes of transportation, their current types of residence, whether or not they planned to own their own residences, and the availability of public utilities. Respondents were surveyed on what foreign and domestic companies they were familiar with and which forms of media they used to obtain consumer and political information. Background information includes age, sex, occupation, employment status, household income, family structure, number of people in household, number of children, education, marital status, English proficiency, religious affiliation, and religious participation.

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Title: AsiaBarometer, 2004

Source: Takashi Inoguchi, Chuo University

Owner: ICPSR 20420

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Codename: AsiaB04

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: The AsiaBarometer, 2004 represents a cross-national effort to study the lives of the peoples of East and Southeast Asia on physical, psychological, and sociological dimensions. The project was designed to capture the extent to which respondents experience the affective and cognitive qualities of life, focusing on their assessments of their own lives as well as their relationships to family, neighborhood, workplace, social institutions, political institutions, and the marketplace. Attitudes toward development, democracy, and regionalization were examined, as were the types of goods and services desired and consumer habits. Respondents were queried on their overall personal satisfaction as well as their satisfaction with their friendships, family life, marriage, standard of living, housing, household income, health, education, neighbors, job, leisure time, public safety, the condition of the environment, the social welfare system, and the political system. Data were gathered on the respondents' personal priorities and those they had for their children, as well as their level of trust in others, their inclination to help others, and what characteristics and affiliations they used to identify themselves. Respondents were asked to rate the efficacy of their national governments in handling the economy, political corruption, human rights, unemployment, crime, public services, immigration, ethnic conflict, religious conflict, and environmental problems. Additional questions asked whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, what type of political systems respondents favored, and the extent to which the national government, the local government, the army, the legal system, the police, the national legislative branch (e.g., Parliament, Congress), the public education system, large domestic companies, multinational companies, trade/labor unions, the media, and other nongovernmental organizations (e.g., environmental, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations) could be trusted to operate in the best interests of society. Participants were asked which macro-socioeconomic issues they were most concerned with and what matters they believed the government should spend more or less on. Respondents were polled on their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and their perspectives on the importance of political and electoral participation. Additional questions addressed respondent exposure to and opinions of foreign companies, peoples, governments, and cultures. Market analysis inquiries included what products respondents owned, planned to own in the near future, or desired to own, as well as what consumer services they had used or would like to use. Respondents were asked about their modes of transportation, their current types of residence, whether or not they planned to own their own residences, and the availability of public utilities. Respondents were surveyed on what foreign and domestic companies they were familiar with and which forms of media they used to obtain consumer and political information. Background information includes age, sex, occupation, employment status, household income, family structure, number of people in household, number of children, education, marital status, English proficiency, religious affiliation, and religious participation.

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Title: AsiaBarometer, 2005

Source: Takashi Inoguchi, Chuo University

Owner: Shin Joho Center in Tokyo

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: AsiaB05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The AsiaBarometer, 2005 with the project identification number 17002002 and covers fourteen countries in South and Central Asia. It represents a cross-national effort to study the lives of the peoples of East and Southeast Asia on physical, psychological, and sociological dimensions. The project was designed to capture the extent to which respondents experience the affective and cognitive qualities of life, focusing on their assessments of their own lives as well as their relationships to family, neighborhood, workplace, social institutions, political institutions, and the marketplace. Attitudes toward development, democracy, and regionalization were examined, as were the types of goods and services desired and consumer habits. Respondents were queried on their overall personal satisfaction as well as their satisfaction with their friendships, family life, marriage, standard of living, housing, household income, health, education, neighbors, job, leisure time, public safety, the condition of the environment, the social welfare system, and the political system. Data were gathered on the respondents' personal priorities and those they had for their children, as well as their level of trust in others, their inclination to help others, and what characteristics and affiliations they used to identify themselves. Respondents were asked to rate the efficacy of their national governments in handling the economy, political corruption, human rights, unemployment, crime, public services, immigration, ethnic conflict, religious conflict, and environmental problems. Additional questions asked whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, what type of political systems respondents favored, and the extent to which the national government, the local government, the army, the legal system, the police, the national legislative branch (e.g., Parliament, Congress), the public education system, large domestic companies, multinational companies, trade/labor unions, the media, and other nongovernmental organizations (e.g., environmental, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations) could be trusted to operate in the best interests of society. Participants were asked which macro-socioeconomic issues they were most concerned with and what matters they believed the government should spend more or less on. Respondents were polled on their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and their perspectives on the importance of political and electoral participation. Additional questions addressed respondent exposure to and opinions of foreign companies, peoples, governments, and cultures. Market analysis inquiries included what products respondents owned, planned to own in the near future, or desired to own, as well as what consumer services they had used or would like to use. Respondents were asked about their modes of transportation, their current types of residence, whether or not they planned to own their own residences, and the availability of public utilities. Respondents were surveyed on what foreign and domestic companies they were familiar with and which forms of media they used to obtain consumer and political information. Background information includes age, sex, occupation, employment status, household income, family structure, number of people in household, number of children, education, marital status, English proficiency, religious affiliation, and religious participation.

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Title: AsiaBarometer, 2006

Source: Takashi Inoguchi, Chuo University

Owner: Shin Joho Center in Tokyo

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: AsiaB06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The AsiaBarometer, 2006 with the project identification number 17002002, which covers seven societies in East and Southeast Asia.It represents a cross-national effort to study the lives of the peoples of East and Southeast Asia on physical, psychological, and sociological dimensions. The project was designed to capture the extent to which respondents experience the affective and cognitive qualities of life, focusing on their assessments of their own lives as well as their relationships to family, neighborhood, workplace, social institutions, political institutions, and the marketplace. Attitudes toward development, democracy, and regionalization were examined, as were the types of goods and services desired and consumer habits. Respondents were queried on their overall personal satisfaction as well as their satisfaction with their friendships, family life, marriage, standard of living, housing, household income, health, education, neighbors, job, leisure time, public safety, the condition of the environment, the social welfare system, and the political system. Data were gathered on the respondents' personal priorities and those they had for their children, as well as their level of trust in others, their inclination to help others, and what characteristics and affiliations they used to identify themselves. Respondents were asked to rate the efficacy of their national governments in handling the economy, political corruption, human rights, unemployment, crime, public services, immigration, ethnic conflict, religious conflict, and environmental problems. Additional questions asked whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, what type of political systems respondents favored, and the extent to which the national government, the local government, the army, the legal system, the police, the national legislative branch (e.g., Parliament, Congress), the public education system, large domestic companies, multinational companies, trade/labor unions, the media, and other nongovernmental organizations (e.g., environmental, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations) could be trusted to operate in the best interests of society. Participants were asked which macro-socioeconomic issues they were most concerned with and what matters they believed the government should spend more or less on. Respondents were polled on their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and their perspectives on the importance of political and electoral participation. Additional questions addressed respondent exposure to and opinions of foreign companies, peoples, governments, and cultures. Market analysis inquiries included what products respondents owned, planned to own in the near future, or desired to own, as well as what consumer services they had used or would like to use. Respondents were asked about their modes of transportation, their current types of residence, whether or not they planned to own their own residences, and the availability of public utilities. Respondents were surveyed on what foreign and domestic companies they were familiar with and which forms of media they used to obtain consumer and political information. Background information includes age, sex, occupation, employment status, household income, family structure, number of people in household, number of children, education, marital status, English proficiency, religious affiliation, and religious participation.

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Title: AsiaBarometer, 2007

Source: Takashi Inoguchi, Chuo University

Owner: Shin Joho Center in Tokyo

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: AsiaB07

Year: 2007

Status: A

Description: The AsiaBarometer, 2007 with the project identification number of 17002002, covers seven societies in Southeast Asia. It represents a cross-national effort to study the lives of the peoples of East and Southeast Asia on physical, psychological, and sociological dimensions. The project was designed to capture the extent to which respondents experience the affective and cognitive qualities of life, focusing on their assessments of their own lives as well as their relationships to family, neighborhood, workplace, social institutions, political institutions, and the marketplace. Attitudes toward development, democracy, and regionalization were examined, as were the types of goods and services desired and consumer habits. Respondents were queried on their overall personal satisfaction as well as their satisfaction with their friendships, family life, marriage, standard of living, housing, household income, health, education, neighbors, job, leisure time, public safety, the condition of the environment, the social welfare system, and the political system. Data were gathered on the respondents' personal priorities and those they had for their children, as well as their level of trust in others, their inclination to help others, and what characteristics and affiliations they used to identify themselves. Respondents were asked to rate the efficacy of their national governments in handling the economy, political corruption, human rights, unemployment, crime, public services, immigration, ethnic conflict, religious conflict, and environmental problems. Additional questions asked whether government officials were responsive to problems of the general population, what type of political systems respondents favored, and the extent to which the national government, the local government, the army, the legal system, the police, the national legislative branch (e.g., Parliament, Congress), the public education system, large domestic companies, multinational companies, trade/labor unions, the media, and other nongovernmental organizations (e.g., environmental, social advocacy groups, and nonprofit organizations) could be trusted to operate in the best interests of society. Participants were asked which macro-socioeconomic issues they were most concerned with and what matters they believed the government should spend more or less on. Respondents were polled on their level of personal involvement in political, governmental, and community affairs, the inclusiveness of the government, and their perspectives on the importance of political and electoral participation. Additional questions addressed respondent exposure to and opinions of foreign companies, peoples, governments, and cultures. Market analysis inquiries included what products respondents owned, planned to own in the near future, or desired to own, as well as what consumer services they had used or would like to use. Respondents were asked about their modes of transportation, their current types of residence, whether or not they planned to own their own residences, and the availability of public utilities. Respondents were surveyed on what foreign and domestic companies they were familiar with and which forms of media they used to obtain consumer and political information. Background information includes age, sex, occupation, employment status, household income, family structure, number of people in household, number of children, education, marital status, English proficiency, religious affiliation, and religious participation.

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Title: Assessing Happiness and Competitiveness of World Major Metropolises, 2006

Source: Lee, Nam Young, Korean Social Science Data Center

Owner: ICPSR 27901

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Codename: ahcwm06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: This study aimed to empirically examine happiness and community/city conditions assessed by residents living in ten major cities of the world: Beijing, Berlin, London, Milan, New York City, Paris, Seoul, Stockholm, Tokyo, and Toronto. Respondents were asked questions about themselves and their city of residence. Questions focused on a range of topics including the economy, culture and education, welfare, safety, environment, living conditions, city administration, community life, health, and happiness. Demographic questions included city of residence, gender, age, education level, income level, occupation, marital status, and religion.

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Title: Assessing the Consequences of Politicized Confirmation Processes, 2005-2006

Source: Gibson, James L., Washington University in St. Louis

Owner: ICPSR 31841

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Codename: ACPCP0506

Year: 2005-2006

Status: A

Description: The data collection represents a loose collaboration between Georgetown University’s Center for Democracy and Civil Society (CDACS) and the European Social Survey (ESS). These data contain responses from three separate interviews referred to as Wave One (t1), Wave Two (t2), and Wave Three (t3). Wave One data are from the United States Citizenship, Involvement, Democracy (CID) Survey, and consisted of in-person interviews with a representative sample of 1,001 Americans. The CID survey is a study of American civic engagement, social capital, and democracy in comparative perspective, and it provides perspective on citizen participation in both the public and private realms. The CID survey is integrated with several elements of a module from the 2002 version of the ESS, which was administered in 22 European countries. In addition to the replicated questions from the ESS, the CID survey includes questions related to the themes of social capital, activities in formal clubs and organizations, informal social networks and activities, personal networks (strong and weak ties), the composition and diversity of ties and associations, trust (in other people, the community, institutions, and politicians), local democracy and participation, democratic values, political citizenship, social citizenship, views on immigration and diversity, political identifications, ideology, mobilization and action, and tolerance (concerning views and attitudes, least-likes groups, and racial stereotypes). Wave Two data was collected during the Alito Confirmation Process through re-interviews via telephone of 335 respondents who had completed the 2005 (Wave One) survey. Wave Three data was obtained after the Alito Confirmation Process, comprising re-interviews via telephone of 259 individuals who particpated in Wave Two. Both Wave Two and Wave Three included questions regarding respondents' political affiliations, views on politics and social issues, and trust in groups of people and institutions. In addition the survey queried respondents concerning their knowledge and opinion of the United States Supreme Court and Congress, Supreme Court judges, the confirmation of Samuel Alito to the Supreme Court, as well as advertisements about the process, and their opinion on the rulings of the Supreme Court. Demographic variables include: Wave One - age, gender, race, marital status, religious affilitation and participation, highest level of education (respondent and respondent's partner), employment status (respondent and respondent's partner), income, nationality, and citizenship; Wave Two - has no demographic variables; Wave Three - age, gender, race, and religious affiliation and participation. Also included are attributes of the interviewer and interviewer observations.

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Title: Attitudinal Distance in Southeast Asia, 1970-1971

Source: Howell, Llewellyn

Owner: ICPSR 5012

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Codename: ADSA7071

Year:  

Status: A

Description: This saidy contains data for 2,238 randomly selected university students interviewed in 1970-1971. Students were interviewed in their native language in Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia. There are a total of seventy-two variables including sixteen biographical, twenty-nine social distance attitudes towards certain nationals and ethnic groups. and twenty-seven international distance responses to national and ethnic groups. (CLASS II)

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Title: Australian National Social Science Survey, 1984

Source: Jonathan Kelley;Robert G. Cushing;Bruce Headey

Owner: ICPSR 9084

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Codename: ANSSS84

Year: 1984

Status: A

Description: This multipurpose survey measures a wide range of variables of interest in sociology, political science, and labor economics. It is similar to national social surveys conducted regularly in the United States, Britain, and West Germany, and much of the data are directly comparable. The questionnaire covers attitudes toward a broad range of topics, including government expenditures, taxation, inflation, crime, poverty, women and careers, migrants, political figures, and confidence in institutions such as banks and police. Other questions relate to the respondent's personal feelings about life, health, religion, moral issues, and family relationships. Political and economic data provided include party preference and voting history, income, and occupation. Additional background variables are available on education, birthplace, ethnic origin, religion, age, sex, location and size of town of residence, marital status, and union membership.

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Title: Balance Of Payments Statistics

Source: International Monetary Fund.

Owner: ICPSR 8623

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Codename: BPS96

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: These time series data provide information on the balance of payments among countries and geographical areas of the world. Detailed tabulations included in this collection describe (1)transactions in goods, services, and income between an economy and the rest of the world, (2) changes of ownership and other changes in that country's monetary gold, special drawing rights (SDRs), and claims and liabilities to the rest of the world, and (3) unrequited transfers and counterpart entries that are needed to balance, in the accounting sense, any entries for previous transactions and changes which are not mutually offsetting. Aggregated and detailed presentations show data for items such as investments, short- and long-term capital, reserves, and changes in reserves.

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Title: Baltimore Travel Survey, 1977

Source: Stahr, Mark, United States Department of Transportation. Federal Highway Administration;

Owner: ICPSR 34418

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Codename: BTS77

Year: 1977

Status: A

Description: The Baltimore Travel Survey, 1977, is a comprehensive collection of demographic characteristics and travel patterns for 967 households in Baltimore, Maryland. The survey was conducted in May and June of 1977; survey results have been maintained and distributed by the United States Federal Highway Administration. Survey participants were asked to provide detailed household information, including length of residency at current address, number of household occupants, type of dwelling unit, number of vehicles available to household occupants, and the body type of each vehicle. Respondents were also asked to provide information on their travel behavior during a 24-hour assessment period, including trip duration and frequency, trip purpose, departure and arrival times, mode of transportation, number of passengers, and parking cost. Demographic information for this collection includes age, sex, disability, race, spoken language, marital status, income, and educational attainment.

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Title: Bay Area Travel Study, 1996

Source: NuStats

Owner: ICPSR 34797

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Codename: bats96

Year: 1996

Status: A

Description: The purpose of the 1996 Bay Area Travel Study was to survey households in California’s nine county Bay Area (including Oakland, San Francisco, and San Jose) to collect information on activities and travel in the area. This study focused on households who used the Bay Bridge corridor, either by driving or using transit. The 1996 Bay Area Travel Study varies from other household travel surveys in that households were asked to record all of their activities for a specific two-day period, rather than complete a 24-hour travel log. Respondents were asked to report detailed information regarding their travel, including trip locations, mode of transportation, trip start and end times, trip purpose, and trip activities. Demographic variables include gender, age, employment status, whether the respondent held a valid driver's license, occupation, whether the respondent was a student, income, education level, ethnicity, whether the respondent had a disability, and whether the respondent was a volunteer.

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Title: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Annual Survey 2013

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Owner: CDC

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: BRFSS13A

Year: 2013

Status: A

Description: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the nation's premier system of health-related telephone surveys that collect state data about U.S. residents regarding their health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, and use of preventive services. Established in 1984 with 15 states, BRFSS now collects data in all 50 states as well as the District of Columbia and three U.S. territories. BRFSS completes more than 400,000 adult interviews each year, making it the largest continuously conducted health survey system in the world.By collecting behavioral health risk data at the state and local level, BRFSS has become a powerful tool for targeting and building health promotion activities. The 2013 BRFSS data continues to reflect the changes initially made in 2011 in weighting methodology (raking) and the addition of cell phone only respondents. The aggregate BRFSS combined landline and cell phone dataset is built from the landline and cell phone data submitted for 2013 and includes data for 50 states, the District of Columbia Guam, and Puerto Rico. More information on 2014 BRFSS can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/annual_data/annual_2014.html

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Title: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Annual Survey 2014

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Owner: CDC

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: BRFSS14A

Year: 2014

Status: A

Description: The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is the nation's premier system of health-related telephone surveys that collect state data about U.S. residents regarding their health-related risk behaviors, chronic health conditions, and use of preventive services. Established in 1984 with 15 states, BRFSS now collects data in all 50 states as well as the District of Columbia and three U.S. territories. BRFSS completes more than 400,000 adult interviews each year, making it the largest continuously conducted health survey system in the world.By collecting behavioral health risk data at the state and local level, BRFSS has become a powerful tool for targeting and building health promotion activities. The 2014 BRFSS data continues to reflect the changes initially made in 2011 in weighting methodology (raking) and the addition of cell phone only respondents. The aggregate BRFSS combined landline and cell phone dataset is built from the landline and cell phone data submitted for 2014 and includes data for 50 states, the District of Columbia Guam, and Puerto Rico. More information on 2014 BRFSS can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/annual_data/annual_2014.html

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Title: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Asthma Call-Back Survey, 2009

Source: United States Department of Health and Human Services. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Public Health Surveillance Program Office

Owner: ICPSR 34300

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Codename: BRFSS09

Year: 2009

Status: A

Description: Asthma is one of the nation's most common and costly chronic conditions, affecting over 38 million Americans at some time in their lives. Managing asthma requires a long term, multifaceted approach, including patient education, behavior changes, asthma trigger avoidance, pharmacological therapy, and frequent medical follow-up. This study provides asthma data available at the state and local level to direct and evaluate interventions undertaken by asthma control programs located in the state health departments. Improved tracking for asthma is critical for planning and evaluating efforts to reduce the health burden from the disease. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) is a state-based system of health surveys that collects information on health risk behaviors, preventive health practices, and health care access primarily related to chronic disease and injury. For many states, the BRFSS is the only available source of timely, accurate data on health-related behaviors. BRFSS was established in 1984 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); currently data are collected monthly in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, and Guam. More than 350,000 adults are interviewed each year, making the BRFSS the largest telephone health survey in the world. States use BRFSS data to identify emerging health problems, establish and track health objectives, and develop and evaluate public health policies and programs. The BRFSS is a cross-sectional telephone survey conducted by state health departments with technical and methodological assistance provided by CDC. States conduct monthly telephone surveillance using a standardized questionnaire to determine the distribution of risk behaviors and health practices among adults. Responses are forwarded to CDC, where the monthly data are aggregated for each state, returned with standard tabulations, and published at the year's end by each state. The BRFSS questionnaire was developed jointly by CDC's Behavioral Surveillance Branch (BSB) and the states. Data derived from the questionnaire provide health departments, public health officials, and policymakers with necessary behavioral information. When combined with mortality and morbidity statistics, these data enable public health officials to establish policies and priorities and to initiate and assess health promotion strategies. Demographic variables include race, age, sex, education level, marital status, employment status, and income level.

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Title: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), SMART: BRFSS City and County Survey Data 2012

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Owner: CDC

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: BRFSS12C

Year: 2012

Status: A

Description: CDC analyzes BRFSS data for metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas (MMSAs), to provide localized health information that can help public health practitioners identify local emerging health problems, plan and evaluate local responses, and efficiently allocate resources to specific needs. The Selected Metropolitan/Micropolitan Area Risk Trends of BRFSS SMART BRFSS) uses BRFSS data to provide prevalence rates for selected conditions and behaviors for cities and their surrounding counties. For the corresponding annual questionnaires used to collect this information, see the Questionnaires section of this site. For other data sets, see the Annual Survey Data and BRFSS Maps (GIS) sections of this site. To access SMART trends and charts, see the SMART: BRFSS City and County Database. More information on 2012 BRFSS City and County Survey Data can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/smart/smart_2012.html

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Title: British Social Attitudes Survey, 1999

Source: National Centre for Social Research

Owner: ICPSR 3898

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Codename: bsas1999

Year: 1999

Status: A

Description: This survey is part of a continuing series designed to monitor trends in a wide range of social attitudes in Great Britain. The British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA) is similar in purpose to the General Social Survey carried out by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) in the United States. The BSA questionnaire has two parts, one administered by an interviewer and the other completed by the respondent. As in the past, the 1999 interview questionnaire contained a number of "core" questions covering the major topic areas of defense, the economy, labor market participation, and the welfare state. The 1999 self-enumerated questionnaire was devoted to a series of questions on a range of social, economic, political, and moral issues. Topics covered (by section) are: (1) newspaper readership, (2) party identification, (3) housing, (4) public spending and social welfare, (5) health, (6) economic activity and labor market, (7) English nationalism, (8) constitutional issues, (9) begging, (10) religion, (11) administration, (12) countryside, (13) transport, (14) education, and (15) taste and decency. An international initiative funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP), also contributed a module to the BSA. The topic of the ISSP module in this collection was social inequality. Additional demographic data gathered included age, gender, education, occupation, household income, marital status, social class, and religious and political affiliations. Date added: 10-13-2004.

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Title: British Social Attitudes Survey, 2001

Source: National Centre for Social Research

Owner: ICPSR 3900

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Codename: BSAS01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This survey is part of a continuing series designed to monitor trends in a wide range of social attitudes in Great Britain. The British Social Attitudes Survey (BSA) is similar in purpose to the General Social Survey carried out by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) in the United States. The main BSA questionnaire (Part 1) has two parts, one administered by an interviewer and the other completed by the respondent. As in the past, the 2001 interview questionnaire contained a number of "core" questions covering the major topic areas of defense, the economy, labor market participation, and the welfare state. The 2001 self-enumerated questionnaire was devoted to a series of questions on a range of social, economic, political, and moral issues. Topics covered are: (1) political attitudes, (2) public spending and welfare, (3) health care, (4) health and safety in the workplace, (5) national identity, (6) education, (7) drugs, and (8) transport. An international initiative funded by the Nuffield Foundation, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP), also contributed a module to the BSA. The topic of the ISSP module in this collection was social networks. Additional demographic data gathered included age, gender, education, occupation, household income, marital status, social class, and religious and political affiliations. The 2001 survey also produced a second data file containing information on socio-economic classifications. With the 2001 census, National Statistics changed their coding scheme of occupations from SOC90 to SOC2000. In order to assess how consistent the new coding scheme was with the old one, one third of the 2001 BSA sample (version C) was coded using both the SOC90 and the SOC2000 schemes. Part 2 of this collection contains the variables from this experiment.

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Title: Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File, 1940- 1987:[United States]

Source:  US. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administr

Owner: ICPSR 9075

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Codename: BHPARF4087

Year: 1987

Status: A

Description: The Area Resource File (ARF) is a county data from a wide variety of sources that are useful to health analysts and other researchers investigating the nation's health care delivery system. This file contains over 6,000 data elements for all counties in the United States except Alaska. Data elements include county descriptor codes, health professions data including number of professionals working in different fields, health facility and training data, population and economy data, and limited data on vital statistics, industry, housing expenditure, and environmental factors.

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Title: Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File, 1940-1990: [United States]

Source:  United States Department of Health and Human Services. Health Resources and Services Administration. Bureau of Health Professions

Owner: ICPSR 9075

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Codename: BHPARF4490

Year: 1940-1990

Status: A

Description: The Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File is a county-based data file summarizing secondary data from a wide variety of sources into a single file to facilitate health analysis. The file contains over 6,000 data elements for all counties in the United States with the exception of Alaska, for which there is a state total, and certain independent cities that have been combined into their appropriate counties. The data elements include: (1) County descriptor codes (name, FIPS, HSA, PSRO, SMSA, SEA, BEA, city size, P/MSA, Census Contiguous County, shortage area designation, etc.), (2) Health professions data (number of professionals registered as M.D., D.O., DDS, R.N., L.P.N., veterinarian, pharmacist, optometrist, podiatrist, and dental hygienist), (3) Health facility data (hospital size, type, utilization, staffing and services, and nursing home data), (4) Population data (size, composition, employment, housing, morbidity, natality, mortality by cause, by sex and race, and by age, and crime data), (5) Health Professions Training data (training programs, enrollments, and graduates by type), (6) Expenditure data (hospital expenditures, Medicare enrollments and reimbursements, and Medicare prevailing charge data), (7) Economic data (total, per capita, and median income, income distribution, and AFDC recipients), and (8) Environment data (land area, large animal population, elevation, latitude and longitude of population centroid, water hardness index, and climate data).

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Title: Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File, 1940-1995: [United States]

Source:  US. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administr

Owner: ICPSR 6897

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Codename: BHPARF4095

Year: 1996

Status: A

Description: The Bureau of Health Professions Area Resource File is a county-based data file summarizing secondary data from a wide variety of sources to facilitate health analysis. This 1996 release of the Area Resource File contains over 6,000 data elements for all counties in the United States with the exception of Alaska, for which there is a state total, and certain independent cities that have been combined into their appropriate counties. The data elements include: (1) County descriptor codes (name, FIPS, HSA, PSRO, SMSA, SEA, BEA, city size, Census Contiguous County, shortage area designation, 1994 Primary/Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and 1995 Rural/Urban Continuum Codes, etc.), (2) Health professions data (number of professionals registered as M.D., D.O., D.D.S., R.N., L.P.N., veterinarian, pharmacist, optometrist, podiatrist, and dental hygienist, along with critical shortage codes, 1994 physicians by specialty, and major professional activity), (3) Health facility data (hospital size, type, utilization, staffing and services, nursing home data, and HMO enrollment for 1976 through 1994), (4) Utilization data (rate, inpatient days, outpatient visits, and surgical operations), (5) Population data (size, composition, employment, education, housing, morbidity, natality, and mortality by cause, sex, race, and age), (6) Economic data (total income, per capita income, median income, income distribution, and AFDC recipients), (7) Health professions training data (training programs, enrollments, and graduates by type), (8) Expenditure data (hospital expenditures, Medicare enrollments and reimbursements, and Medicare prevailing charge data), and (9) Environment data (land area, large animal population, elevation, latitude and longitude of population centroid, water hardness index, and climate data).

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Title: California Statewide Household Travel Survey, 2000-2001

Source: Casas, Jesse, NuStats

Owner: ICPSR 34677

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Codename: CSHTS01

Year:  2000-2001

Status: A

Description: The California Statewide Household Travel Survey, 2000-2001 was conducted in all 58 counties in California. Respondents were asked to record their travel and activities for either a 24- or 48-hour period. They were also asked to report detailed information regarding their trips, including trip times, mode of transportation, trip activities, trip origin, and trip destination. Demographic variables include gender, age, employment status, household size, vehicle ownership, whether household members were students on their given travel day, household income, type of housing unit, and whether respondents had a valid driver’s license at the time of the survey.

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Title: Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development [Great Britain], 1961-1981

Source: Farrington, David P.

Owner: ICPSR 8488

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Codename: CSDD

Year:  

Status: A

Description: This data collection effort, initiated by Dr. Donald J. West and continued by Dr. David Farrington, was undertaken to test several hypotheses about delinquency. The investigators examined socioeconomic conditions, schooling, friendship, parent-child relationships, extracurricular activities, school records, and criminal records. They also performed psychological tests to determine the causes of crime and delinquency. Information in the survey includes reports from peers, family size, child-rearing behavior, job histories, leisure habits, truancy, popularity, physical attributes, tendencies toward violence, sexual activity, and self-reported delinquency.

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Title: Campaign Finance in Local Elections: An Eleven City Study, 1989-2007 [United States]

Source: Adams, Brian, San Diego State University

Owner: ICPSR 25801

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Codename: CFLE8907

Year: 1989-2007

Status: A

Description: This study contains campaign finance data for candidates in local elections held from 1989 to 2007 in the following cities: New York City (NY), Los Angeles (CA), Chicago (IL), San Francisco (CA), Seattle (WA), Miami (FL), Tampa (FL), Lexington (KY), Louisville (KY), Sacramento (CA), and Long Beach (CA). Data were also collected for the counties Hillsborough County/Tampa (FL) and Miami-Dade (FL). The study includes data on funds raised and spent, as well as candidate data and election returns, and both mayoral and city council races. Information was also collected on the size of the population of the candidates jurisdiction, the amount of political contributions and committee expenditures, whether the election was held in a publicly-funded city, and the outcome of the election. Demographic variables include candidate's sex, race, political party, education, and occupation.

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Title: Canadian Federal Election Study, 1968

Source: Meisel, John

Owner: ICPSR 7009

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Codename: CFES68

Year: 1968

Status: A

Description: Data for this study were obtained from a probability cross-section sample of adults interviewed following the June 1968 federal election. Besides basic background information, questions were asked about reactions to the election outcome, evaluations of the parties and candidates, regional conflicts within Canada, and a wide variety of issues that were salient during the campaign. 2,767 respondents, 11 cards of data per respondent, and 530 variables.

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Title: Canadian National Election Study, 1965

Source: Richard Johnston, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 7225

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Codename: CNES65

Year: 1965

Status:  A

Description: The respondents were administered a post-election questionnaire during the winter (January-March) of 1966 and form a stratified probability cross-section sample of the Canadian population eligible to vote. Open-ended questions measured the respondents' attitudes toward the problems confronting Canada, campaign issues, and also their political efficacy and trust in government. The respondents were questioned about their political party attachments, voting behavior, campaign activities, and attitudes toward campaign financing. 2,118 respondents, weighted to 8,193 (integer weight) or 2,719.04 (decimal weight), 7 cards of data per respondent, and 337 variables.

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Title: Canadian National Election Study, 1972

Source: Richard Johnston, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 7410

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Codename: CNES72

Year: 1972

Status:  A

Description: Three studies are included in this set of national Canadian election surveys of 1972. All three were conducted by telephone, two were administered prior to the national election, and one following the October 31st election date. The first study, conducted between June and July 1972, focused on the respondents' opinions of the political parties, and of issues and personalities in Federal politics. The issues that were assessed included inflation, constitutional reform, campaign spending, marijuana legislation, and the right of federal employees to strike. The respondents were also asked to assess the performance of the Prime Minister and also the qualifications of the main opposition candidates. Finally, the respondents were asked about their partisan affiliation and their voting behavior over the past few elections. The dataset included information on 1,000 respondents (two cards of data per respondent). The only demographic information in this study is the sex of the respondent. The second study was conducted in September 1972 and assessed the respondents' opinions on political issues such as unemployment, Canadian/United States relations, environment, taxes, price controls, and certain federal programs. In addition, the respondents were questioned about their candidate preference, partisan identification, and party preference for the upcoming election. Basic demographic data were also included for the 1,255 respondents (three cards of data per respondent). The third study in this series was administered in early November. The respondents were asked to evaluate the federal election campaign, the candidates, parties, and political issues. The respondents were also questioned about their voting behavior in both the federal and local elections. Two forms of questionnaires were used, one for voters and the other for non-voters. Demographic information was obtained for all respondents. The dataset contains information on approximately 1,298 respondents (four cards of data per respondent).

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Title: Canadian National Election Study, 1974

Source: Richard Johnston, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 7379

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Codename: CNES74

Year: 1974

Status:  A

Description: This post-election survey covers a wide range of areas involving citizen participation in politics. Respondents were asked about their interest in politics, their images of party leaders, the 1974 election campaign, their opinions on political and social issues, and their party identification. A detailed family history is also included in this study. Information on father's, grandfather's, and son's occupation, party identification, and education provides an elaborate mapping of the paternal linkage pattern. The survey also includes standard demographic information for each respondent. The study contains 2,562 respondents and approximately 480 variables.

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Title: Canadian National Election Study, 1984

Source: Richard Johnston, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 8544

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Codename: CNES84

Year: 1984

Status:  A

Description: Topics covered in this survey include the respondent's interest in politics in general and in the 1984 Federal Election in particular, political trust, respondent assessment of the most important issues in the 1984 election, party identification at both the federal and provincial level, exposure to the campaign including the television debates, respondent's vote and reasons for that decision, attitudes towards the parties and their leaders, feeling thermometer ratings of party leaders and various groups, attitudes toward social class, and various other social and political attitudes. Background information such as education, occupation, religion, language, and group memberships was also obtained from respondents. In addition, the interview data were augmented with information about the socio-demographic and political characteristics of the consituency in which each respondent resided.

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Title: Canadian National Election Study, 1988

Source: Richard Johnston, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 9386

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Codename: CNES88

Year: 1988

Status:  A

Description: This collection, containing information on the voting behaviour and political attitudes of Canadians, consists of three waves of data gathered before and after th 1988 Canadian national election. The first wave, conducted by telephone in October and November 1988 before the November 21st election, focused on respondents' interest in the elction, perceptions of the media, voting intentions, attitudes toward policy and campaign issues, assessments of government performance, and ratings of leaders, parties, and candidates. Other items included the respondents' sociodemographic and economic characteristics, as well as party, candidate, and constituency identification. The second wave, condiucted by telephone, after the election from November 1988 through January 1989, contained some of the same items covered in the first wave but also included questions on voting behavior, campaign activities, and groups in Canadian society, along with a special battery on free trade. The third wave, conducted by mail from December 1988 through March 1989, explored fiscal priorities, the economy, policy issues, changes to Canadian society, political efficacy, societal goals, capitalist values, rights and liberties, and conception of community. Class IV

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Title: Candidate and Constituency Statistics of Elections in the United States, 1788-1990

Source: ICPSR

Owner: ICPSR 7757

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Codename: CNCSOEUS

Year: 1788-1990

Status: A

Description: These data are derived from CANDIDATE NAME AND CONSTITUENCY TOTALS, 1788-1990 (ICPSR 0002). They consist of returns for two-thirds of all elections from 1788 to 1823 to the offices of president, governor, and United States representative, and over 90 percent of all elections to those offices since 1824. They also include information on United States Senate elections since 1912. Returns for one additional statewide office are included beginning with the 1968 election. This file provides a set of derived measures describing the vote totals for candidates and the pattern of contest in each constituency. These measures include the total number of votes cast for all candidates in the election, each candidate's percentage of the vote received, and several measures of the relative performance of each candidate. They are appended to the individual candidate records and permit extensive analysis of electoral contests over time. This dataset contains returns for all parties and candidates (as well as scattering vote) for general elections and special elections, including information on elections for which returns were available only at the constituency level. Included in this edition are data from the District of Columbia election for United States senator and United States representative. The offices of two senators and one representative were created by the ''District of Columbia Statehood Constitutional Convention Initiative,'' which was approved by District voters in 1980. Elections for these offices were postponed until the 1990 general election. The three offices are currently local District positions, which will turn into federal offices if the District becomes a state.;

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Title: Candidate Countries Eurobarometer 2001.1, October 2001: Life in the Candidate Countries, Attachment to Nationality and Identification with Europe, Contact with Other Countries and Cultures, and European Union Enlargement

Source: Christensen, Thomas, European Commission; Mohedano-Brethes, Ruben, European Commission;

Owner: ICPSR 4054

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Codename: ccEu01-1

Year: October 2001

Status: A

Description: The Candidate Countries Eurobarometer (CCEB) series, first conducted in 2001, gathers information from the countries applying to become members of the European Union (EU) in a way that allows direct comparison with the standard Eurobarometer series carried out in the existing EU countries. The CCEB provides decision-makers and the European public with opinion data on the similarities and differences between the EU and the candidate countries. The CCEB continuously tracks support for EU membership in each country, and records changes in attitudes related to European issues in the candidate countries. This round of the CCEB surveys represents the first wave of surveys conducted in October 2001 in the 13 candidate countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey. Respondents were queried about life satisfaction and expectations, native tongue and foreign languages spoken, European countries visited and worked in, political discussion with friends, media use, trust in institutions such as the written press and churches, and national and European identity. Respondents were further questioned on knowledge of the EU, its image, role, membership process, and meaning and importance in the respondent's life. Respondents were also asked their opinions on EU enlargement, including whether a country was worthy of membership and what advantages the respondent, various groups, and the EU would have should a particular country be granted membership. Additionally, respondents were queried on what, if any, fears they had concerning the building of the EU. They were also asked what resources they would use to obtain information on the EU, how they would prefer to obtain that information, and on which topics they would like to get more information. Lastly, respondents were asked if they had access to devices such as computers, mobile phones, and fax machines. Demographic and other background information includes age, year of birth, gender, nationality, marital status, age when stopped full-time education and level of education, occupation, whether the respondent received government aid, vote intention, religious affiliation and participation, number of people in the household, if the respondent is the head of the household, household income, ownership of durable goods, type of community, and region of residence.

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Title: Candidate Countries Eurobarometer 2002.1, March-April 2002: Social Situation in the Countries Applying for European Union Membership

Source: Christensen, Thomas, European Commission

Owner: ICPSR 29361

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Codename: ccEu02_1

Year: March-April 2002

Status: A

Description: The Candidate Countries Eurobarometer (CCEB) series, first conducted in 2001, gathers information from the countries applying to become members of the European Union (EU) in a way that allows direct comparison with the standard Eurobarometer series carried out in the existing EU countries. The CCEB provides decision-makers and the European public with opinion data on the similarities and differences between the EU and candidate countries. The CCEB continuously tracks support for EU membership in each country and records changes in attitudes related to European issues in the candidate countries. This round of the CCEB survey was conducted between March 1 and April 5, 2002, in the candidate countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey. The survey first asked respondents three questions in regard to European Union membership. In addition to these questions, respondents were queried on the following major areas of focus: (1) quality of life indicators and life satisfaction, (2) family and children, (3) elderly people, (4) lifestyle and health , (5) access to and quality of social services, (6) household income and standard of living, (7) social protection, inclusion, and exclusion, (8) social and political participation and integration, (9) employment, unemployment, and quality of work, and (10) regional mobility. For the first major area of focus, quality of life indicators and life satisfaction, respondents were questioned about life satisfaction in the past, present, and near future, and particular factors which contribute to or improve their present quality of life. For the second major area of focus, family and children, respondents provided their views in regard to the ideal number of children for a family, decision-making in having a child, age at birth of first child, parental and family roles, and the role of government in improving life for families with children. For the third major area of focus, elderly people, respondents gave their opinion on who should care for elderly persons, as well as who should pay for their care. The survey also asked respondents whether they cared for an individual who has a long-term illness, or who is handicapped or elderly, in-home or outside the home. For the fourth major area of focus, lifestyle and health, respondents were queried about their current lifestyle and whether they had any long-term illness and/or handicap that limits their activities in any way. For the fifth major area of focus, access to and quality of social services, respondents provided feedback about their distance from a particular service or business, their satisfaction with the health and social services in their country, and whether the local or national government, private companies, or associations should provide certain services. For the sixth major area of focus, household income and standard of living, questions asked of respondents included the lowest net monthly income level their household would need in order to make a living, their appraisal of the current household income situation, whether any household member had difficulties in paying the bills, and their ability to save and invest. The survey also queried respondents about their current standard of living, and whether and how they are improving their standard of living. For the seventh major focus, social protection, inclusion, and exclusion, respondents provided their ideas about necessities of the good life, their opinion as to whether they could rely on anyone outside the home for certain problems, and their views on social exclusion, poverty, and the state of the area in which they live within their country. In addition, the respondents were asked about their response to the poor or socially excluded, which entities provide the most help to these individuals versus who should do so, the reasons why people are poor or socially excluded, as well as the extent of social disparities in their country and government’s role in reducing these disparities. For the eighth major area of focus, social and political participation and integration, respondents were asked about their participation in social, community, political, and advocacy groups or organizations. For the ninth major area of focus, employment, unemployment, and quality of work, the survey queried respondents about their current and past employment, employment status, and to describe their job. In addition, respondents identified the average hours they worked per week and stressors arising from their current job situation. For the last major area of focus, regional mobility, respondents were asked about moving in the last ten years, including how often, where, and why or why not, the prospects of moving to a different location in the next five years, the factors that would influence relocation, and whether moving would improve job prospects. In addition, the survey queried respondents about their willingness to live in another European country where the language spoken differs from their native language. Demographic variables include age, gender, marital status, age when stopped full-time education, occupation, income, source of household income, main income earner, number of people living in the household, ownership of durable goods, type and surface of area residence, type of community, and region of residence.

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Title: Candidate Countries Eurobarometer 2003.1, March-May 2003: New Europeans and Culture

Source: Papacostas, Antonis, European Commission

Owner: ICPSR 28682

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Codename: ccEurob03

Year:  March-May 2003

Status: A

Description: The Candidate Countries Eurobarometer (CCEB) series, first conducted in 2001, gathers information from the countries applying to become members of the European Union (EU) in a way that allows direct comparison with the standard Eurobarometer series carried out in the existing EU countries. The CCEB provides decision-makers and the European public with opinion data on the similarities and differences between the EU and candidate countries. The CCEB continuously tracks support for EU membership in each country and records changes in attitudes related to European issues in the candidate countries. This round of the CCEB surveys was conducted between March 20th and May 4th, 2003, in the 13 candidate countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey. This round of Candidate Country Eurobarometer survey queried respondents on the following major areas of focus: (1) the European Union and (2) Cultural Activities. For the first major area of focus, the European Union, respondents were asked for their opinion on their country's bid to join the EU and their benefits of membership in the EU, what role national government and the EU should play in policy areas, and the importance of political and social issues. Respondents were also questioned about foreign policy concerning the positive or negative roles of the EU and the USA in different areas of responsibility such as keeping peace in the world and fighting against poverty. For the second major topic, Cultural Activities, respondents were questioned on what television programs they watch, what radio programs they listen to, their computer usage, reading materials, musical preferences, attendance at cultural activities, and artistic activities. Respondents were also asked if they own various electronic equipment, books, and musical instruments. Demographic and other background information collected includes age, nationality, marital status, age at completion of full-time education, ownership of household durables, occupation, religion, household, income, party affiliation, gender, and household composition.

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Title: Candidate Countries Eurobarometer 2003.5, November-December 2003: Identities and Values, Financial Services and Consumer Protection, and Time Use in the Countries Applying for European Union Membership

Source: Papacostas, Antonis, European Commission; Soufflot de Magny, Renaud, European Commission

Owner: ICPSR 29581

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Codename: ccEu03_5

Year: November-December 2003

Status: A

Description: The Candidate Countries Eurobarometer (CCEB) series, first conducted in 2001, gathers information from the countries applying to become members of the European Union (EU) in a way that allows direct comparison with the standard Eurobarometer series carried out in the existing EU countries. The CCEB provides decision-makers and the European public with opinion data on the similarities and differences between the EU and candidate countries. The CCEB continuously tracks support for EU membership in each country and records changes in attitudes related to European issues in the candidate countries. This round of the CCEB survey was conducted between November 20th and December 24th, 2003, in the 13 candidate countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey. This survey queried respondents on the following: (1) identities and values, (2) financial services and consumer protection, and (3) time use. For the first major area of focus, identities and values, respondents were asked to define what is most important to them, in addition to their personal values and those values which best represent their country, the EU, the United States, and the Arab world. Respondents provided their opinion on statements pertaining to socio-political issues, selected activities with which they were involved, and determined whether they would be willing to learn an additional foreign language and the main motivation for doing so. In addition, the survey asked respondents to identify which topics they were interested, including politics, economics, arts and culture, music, sports, and lifestyles, and to which countries they felt the closest. For the second major area of focus, financial services, respondents were queried on their top three financial priorities, their thoughts about finances and financial services, and ownership of a financial account, investment, or loan. The survey queried respondents about their use of the phone and the Internet in financial transactions, obtaining a financial account, investment, loan, or other service from the EU in the past, and whether they would consider doing so in the next five years. Additional questions asked respondents about the obstacles which prevent the use of financial services anywhere in the EU, the means of payment used and preferred for an important purchase, their use of an electronic purse, as well as their opinion on the ease of carrying out eight particular activities with the banks and insurance companies, and their expectations about the advice provided by their financial institutions. Finally, respondents were asked about the harmonization of their respective countries' consumer protection standards with the EU’s standards. For the third major area of focus, time use, respondents were queried about the number of hours they or their partner spent on paid or voluntary work, child care and household tasks, and attending courses, studying or training. Respondents also answered questions on whether they plan to reduce the number of hours they work, what they intend to do with the extra free time, the preferred duration of the reduction of working hours, and how the reduction in hours would be executed. Respondents provided their opinions on work before retirement, and identified their expected and desired retirement age, work and monetary expectations, and future plans when considering retirement. Answers regarding respondent satisfaction with the hours they spend on life style, health, household, and family related activities were also recorded. The survey also asked respondents about their ability to participate in continuing education, whether they had completed a training course, the number of hours they were involved in for the last course taken, and as to who paid and whether they received time off for the course. In addition, respondents examined the importance and availability of employee benefits at work, whether they had taken any of these benefits in the past 12 months, their satisfaction with these benefits, as well as the ability to partake in employee benefits, and who should pay for these benefits. Respondents identified the activities that had the most impact on their time, their satisfaction with different aspects of life, and expressed their opinion on the importance of making money, working part-time, and stress at work. Finally, the survey queried respondents about whether they worked in the national government or in a state-owned or private company, and the number of children or grandchildren in the household and who takes care of these children. Demographic and other background information includes age, gender, nationality, marital status, age when stopped full-time education and level of education, occupation, whether income was paid by the state, left right political self-placement, vote intention, religious affiliation and participation, household composition, main income earner in household and this person’s occupation, household income, type of community, and region of residence.

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Title: Candidate Countries Eurobarometer 2004.1, February-March 2004

Source: European Commission. Directorate-General Press and Communication

Owner: ICPSR 4350

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Codename: ccEurob04

Year: February-March 2004

Status: A

Description: The Candidate Countries Eurobarometer (CCEB) series, first conducted in 2001, gathers information from the countries applying to become members of the European Union (EU) in a way that allows direct comparison with the standard Eurobarometer series carried out in the existing EU countries. The CCEB provides decision-makers and the European public with opinion data on the similarities and differences between the EU and the candidate countries. The CCEB continuously tracks support for EU membership in each country and records changes in attitudes related to European issues in the candidate countries. This round of the CCEB surveys was conducted between February 20 and March 17, 2004, in the 13 candidate countries: Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey. The three main topics covered were opinions regarding the European Union (EU), health, and Internet use by the respondents' children. For the first topic, respondents were asked about the enlargement of the EU, its policies, and its institutions. They were asked several questions to discern the impact the EU would have on their lives when their residing country joined the EU. Other questions focused on the European Parliament, its elections, and its voting intent. Further questions included national decision-making policies of the EU, statements on EU policies -- particularly foreign and defense policies -- and the EU's role in globalization. For the second main topic, health, the respondents were asked about health care and the health care system in their residing country. Other questions asked about the respondent's role in the care of a person with a long-term illness, a person with a handicap, or the elderly. They were further asked about their own health situations. The third topic was Internet usage. The questions focused on ways to protect children from possible dangers and risks associated with the Internet such as pornographic, discriminatory, or violent content. Respondents answered questions concerning Internet rules in their homes, Internet safety, and procedures for reporting harmful content. Demographic and other background information provided includes each respondent's age, gender, nationality, marital status, left-right political self-placement, occupation, age at completion of education, household income, region of residence, subjective size of community, and religious affiliation.

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Title: Capital Punishment in the United States, 1973-1997

Source: United States Department of Justice. Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Owner: ICPSR 2737

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Codename: CPUS73-97

Year: 1973-1997

Status:  

Description: This data collection provides annual data on prisoners under a sentence of death and prisoners whose offense sentences were commuted or vacated during the period 1973-1997. Information is supplied for basic sociodemographic characteristics such as age, sex, education, and state of incarceration. Criminal history data include prior felony convictions for criminal homicide and legal status at the time of the capital offense. Additional information is available for inmates removed from death row by yearend 1997 and for inmates who were executed.

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Title: Career Values in Brazil, 1960

Source:  Kal, Joseph

Owner: ICPSR 7042

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Codename: CVB60

Year: 1960

Status: A

Description: This study was conducted in 1960 in the Brazilian states of Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, and Rio Grande do Sul. The Study thoroughly describes the respondents' current occupation, length of employment, what they like most and least about their jobs, and their incomes. Variables further explore past occupations, the highest level of education attained, and the extend to which lack of education has handicapped the respondents' career. A major portion of the study probes the respondents' feelings about the nature of jobs and people: the importance of ambition and determination in one's job, individual versus group interests, how best to "get ahead," importance of family ties, tendency to trust others, and corruption in the urban centers. 627 respondents, 3 cards of data per respondent, and approximately 205 variables. The data contain blanks. A number of recodes and derived measures are included in the study. The data were received from the International Data Library and Reference Service, Survey Research Center, University of California at Berkeley.

Media: CSSCR_CD0002

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Title: Carnegie Commission National Surveys of Higher Education: Undergraduate Study Su

Source: Everett Ladd And S. M. Lipset

Owner: ICPSR 7079

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Codename: CCNSHE_UND

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: The data consist of a random fifth sample subsetted from a total of 70,694 mail questionnaires returned by a national sample of college and university undergraduates (Carnegie Commission National Survey of Higher Education: Undergraduate Study, 1969-1970--ICPSR 7503). The data were collected by the Survey Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, and supplied to the ICPSR by the Social Science Data Center at the University of Connecticut. The full population of respondents, as well as this subset, is also available in the Ladd and Lipset collection. 13,139 respondents, weighted to 1,312,178, 10 cards of data per respondent, and 634 variables are included in this dataset.

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Title: Carnegie Middle East Governance and Islam Dataset, 1988-2010

Source: Tessler, Mark, University of Michigan

Owner: ICPSR 32302

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Codename: CMEGI10

Year: 1988-2010

Status: A

Description: The Carnegie Middle East Governance and Islam Dataset includes both individual-level and country-level variables. Data on individual-level variables are drawn from 34 surveys carried out in 12 Arab countries, Turkey, and Iran. Taken together, a total of 54,894 men and women were surveyed. Almost all of the surveys involved face-to-face interviews. Most of the surveys were carried out either as the first wave of the Arab Barometer, the third, fourth, and fifth waves of the World Values Survey, or a project on attitudes related to governance carried out by Mark Tessler with funding from the National Science Foundation. The dataset also includes 4 earlier surveys, as well as variables based on 34 time-specific country-level characteristics, for example, Freedom House political freedom ratings; labor force attributes compiled by the World Bank, the United Nations and others; natural resource rents, also complied by the World Bank; ratings on the United Nations Human Development Index; freedom of religion indices developed by the United States Department of State; and linguistic, ethnic and religious fractionalization indices compiled in a private research project. Demographic variables include age, sex, education, employment status, marital status, religion, and income.

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Title: CBS News California State Poll, July 2001

Source: CBS News.

Owner: ICPSR 3347

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Codename: cbs_csp701

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, conducted on July 16-17, 2001, assessed California residents' opinions on a variety of issues, including George W. Bush's performance as president, energy shortages and conservation, and the investigation into congressional intern Chandra Levy's disappearance. Respondents gave approval ratings of George W. Bush as president, Gray Davis as governor of California, and Gary Condit as United States Representative. Regarding recent energy shortages, respondents stated whether the government should give priority to increasing production of fuels or to encouraging energy conservation. They were asked to assign blame for the California energy shortages and to indicate whether they thought there was a real energy shortage or whether it was a ploy. Respondents gave their opinion on how President Bush and Governor Davis were handling the California energy shortage and commented on when they thought the energy problems would be over, whether they had cut back on their use of electricity, and if so, how. Respondents stated whether they believed public officials should be held to a higher standard in their personal lives, how closely they had been following the news about the disappearance of Chandra Levy, and whether they thought the situation had interfered with Representative Condit's job performance. They were asked whether they were registered to vote, whether they voted for Gary Condit in 2000, and whether they would vote to re-elect Condit. Respondents gave their opinions on whether Condit should resign from office, how much his moral values mattered to respondents in evaluating his job performance, whether Condit had hurt the investigation into Levy's disappearance, whether he had told the police everything, and whether respondents minded that Condit had misled the public about his relationship with Levy. In addition, respondents expressed their views on whether Condit asked Anne Marie Smith to lie about their relationship, whether Condit had anything to do with Levy's disappearance, whether the news media had acted responsibly in coverage of Levy's disappearance, and what proportion of Congress respondents believed had extramarital affairs. Background information on respondents includes gender, age, race, income, political leanings, religion, marital status, and education. Date Added: 07/25/2002

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Title: CBS News Federal Government Poll, February 1989

Source: CBS News. THE NEW YORK TIMES

Owner: ICPSR 9231

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Codename: CBS89_FEB

Year: 1989

Status: A

Description: This data collection focuses on the responsibilities of the United States federal government and various governmental assistance programs. Survey respondents were asked if the government should retrain those who have lost their jobs due to industry shutdowns, if government programs in the 1960s improved conditions for the poor, and if the respondent had needed government assistance in the form of a business loan, Social Security, or housing. Respondents also were asked if the federal government should be responsible for such things as helping people pay for college tuition and day care, requiring employers to provide health care for their employees, and helping people pay for nursing homes or other long-term care. Additional topics covered were the respondent's financial situation, college enrollment, home ownership, and mortgages. Background information on individuals includes party affiliation, age, marital status, sex, education, race, and income.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, April 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4614

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Codename: CBSmp1_Apr06

Year: April 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted April 6-9, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country is facing, the national economy, and to rate the job performance of the United States Congress. Respondents were also asked about the way George W. Bush was handling certain issues, such as the economy, immigration, the war in Iraq, and terrorism, whether or not they approved of his overall job performance, and whether or not he and his policies would affect the way they would vote in Congressional elections. The next section of the survey addressed immigration, legal and illegal immigrants, amnesty, and a security fence between the United States and Mexico. The survey also contained questions about Pope Benedict XVI, the Catholic clergy, various religious groups, Creationism, the Bible, and the respondent's religious background, beliefs, and practices. Respondents were then asked for their opinions on the Republican and Democratic parties, and the war in and the future of Iraq. Additional questions solicited information on whether or not the respondents or someone they knew had served in Iraq, as well as the respondents' television news viewing habits. Background information on respondents includes military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, January 2007

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 21360

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Codename: CBSmp1_Jan07

Year: January 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted January 1-3, 2007, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as the economy and foreign policy. Views were sought on the way things were going in the United States, the newly elected United States Congress, the condition of the national economy, and the Iraq war. Respondents gave their opinions of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and the potential 2008 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Other topics addressed the use of herbal supplements, concern over health care costs, the effect of the Iraq war on the respondent's community, and whether respondents were more likely to vote in a Democratic or Republican primary in the 2008 presidential election. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, military service, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, and the presence of children and household members between the ages of 18 and 24.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, July 2005

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4396

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Codename: CBSMPJul05

Year: July 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted July 13-14, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of how President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as foreign policy and Social Security. Respondents were asked to voice their concerns about what they viewed as the most important problem facing the country, and to give their opinions of the condition of the national economy and how well Congress was doing its job. A series of questions addressed the success of the war against terrorism and the war in Iraq, whether the the United States would be successful, whether troops should be withdrawn, whether the Iraq war was a part of the war on terrorism, and the likelihood of another terrorist attack against the United States. The survey included questions on whether the federal government had done enough to increase safety since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Respondents were also asked for their opinions on abortion and embryonic stem cell research. Several questions focused on the United States Supreme Court, Supreme Court Justices, the Supreme Court decision, Roe v. Wade, and whether Supreme Court justices should take public opinion and their own personal views into account when deciding cases. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, religious affiliation, frequency of religious service attendance, education level, household income, marital status, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, for whom the respondent voted in the 2004 presidential election, whether there were children in the household, and whether there were teens in the household.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, June 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4619

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Codename: CBSmp1-June06

Year: June 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted June 10-11, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency, the economy, immigration and the situation in Iraq. Views were sought on whether respondents approved of the way the United States Congress was handling its job, whether things in the country were going in the right direction, and the most important problem the country was facing. Respondents were asked to rate the condition of the national economy and whether they thought the economy was improving. Opinions were collected on whether respondents considered Iran a threat to the United States to an extent that required military action, whether respondents thought the United states did the right thing in taking military action against Iraq, whether the war with Iraq was worth the loss of life and other costs, whether they thought the United States' efforts to bring stability and order to Iraq were going well, and whether United States troops should stay in Iraq as long as it would be needed to make it a stable democracy. A series of questions asked whether the war with Iraq was a part of the war on terrorism, whether the United States was winning the war on terrorism, and the extent of the impact of the recent killing of al Qaeda leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi by the United States military. Additional topics addressed whether respondents thought gay couples should be allowed to marry or form civil unions, and how often household members watched network news programs. Demographic information includes voter registration status and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, marital status, sex, religious preference, education level, age, household income, race, whether respondents had any children under the age of 18, and the presence of household members between the ages of 13 and 24.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, March 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4613

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Codename: CBSmp1_Mar06

Year: March 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted March 9-12, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country is facing, the national economy, and to rate the job performance of the United States Congress. Respondents were also asked about the way President George W. Bush was handling certain issues such as the economy, foreign policy, the war in Iraq, and terrorism, and whether or not they approved of his overall job performance. The next section of the survey addressed the war in Iraq, reinstatement of a military draft, Saddam Hussein, the future of Iraq, and the effect of the war on the Middle East. Respondents were then asked whether or not they or someone they knew had served in the armed forces in Iraq and if so, about their experiences. Additional questions solicited opinions on the Republican and Democratic parties, political conservatives and liberals, and television news viewing habits. Background information on respondents includes military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, October 2001

Source: CBS News.

Owner: ICPSR 3376

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Codename: CBSMP1OCT01

Year: 2001

Status:  

Description: This poll, conducted on October 8, 2001, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, the national economy, and the attacks of September 11th on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, as well as their views and feelings on the military attacks by the United States against targets in Afghanistan. Respondents also expressed their confidence in the ability of the United States government to capture Osama Bin Laden, to maintain the international alliance of the countries supporting United States military efforts, to achieve its military goals without significant civilian casualties among the Afghan people and without significant United States military casualties, and to protect its citizens from future terrorist attacks. Those queried also presented their views on the likelihood of another terrorist attack in the United States within the next few months, the expected length of time a war against countries that harbor terrorists would last, and any feelings they might have toward Arab people due to the attacks. Additional questions polled respondents on whether the United States was in an economic recession or was near an economic recession, whether there were any unemployed adults in their household, and their concerns about future unemployment in the household. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, race, political affiliation, religion, current and past military service, and marital status. DATE ADDED: 04-25-2003.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, September 2001

Source: CBS News.

Owner: ICPSR 3351

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Codename: cbsmp1sep01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, as well as their views on the September 11 terrorist attacks targeting the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC. Respondents were asked to express their opinions on President Bush's handling of the attacks, their personal feelings about the attacks, their confidence in the United States government's ability to catch the people who planned the attacks, and whether the United States should take military action. In addition, respondents were asked questions regarding whether the United States was in or near a recession. Questions were also posed regarding air travel in the United States and whether respondents might, in the wake of the terrorist attacks, surrender certain personal freedoms, such as having the government monitor the telephone calls and e-mail of ordinary Americans. Questions were also asked regarding immigration and the treatment of Arab Americans. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, political party affiliation, military service, marital status, education, race, and income. Date added: 07/25/2002.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #1, September 2005

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4399

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Codename: CBSMPSep05

Year: September 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded September 6-7, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other social and political issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency and issues such as the situation in Iraq and Hurricane Katrina. Those polled identified the most important problem facing the country, and they expressed their level of confidence in the federal government to protect the country against terrorism and respond to natural disasters. Views were sought on how well federal, state and local government officials prepared for and responded to Hurricane Katrina, who was to blame for the disaster, and whether race and National Guard deployment in Iraq were factors in the government's response. Other questions asked whether the looting and violence in New Orleans in the days following Hurricane Katrina were understandable, whether New Orleans would ever be a working city again, and how well the media covered the hurricane and its aftermath. Respondents were also asked whether they had ever visited New Orleans, whether they or someone they knew was directly affected by Hurricane Katrina, and whether a member of their household made a charitable donation to the victims. Additional topics addressed gasoline prices and availability after the hurricane, United States troop levels in Iraq, whether the United States Senate should confirm United States Supreme Court nominee John Roberts, and how often respondents watched network television news programs. Demographic variables included sex, age, race, marital status, household income, education level, religious preference, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, and for whom the respondent voted in the 2004 presidential election.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #2, April 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4615

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp2_Apr06

Year:  April 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted April 28-30, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country was facing, the national economy, the threat of Iran, the United States' involvement in Iraq, and to rate the job performance of Donald Rumsfeld. Respondents were also asked about the way George W. Bush was handling certain issues, such as the economy, gas prices, immigration, the war in Iraq, and terrorism, as well as whether they approved of his overall job performance. The next section of the survey addressed gasoline prices and the government's role in regulating them. The survey also contained questions about the status of women, working mothers, and the importance of children in marriage. Respondents were then asked about show business, celebrities, their favorite television shows, movies, and music, and whether they downloaded music or watched videos on the Internet. Additional questions asked for their opinions on video games and whether they watched morning or evening newscasts. Background information on respondents includes employment status, military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #2, February 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4612

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp2_Feb06

Year: February 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted February 22-26, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country is facing, the national economy, the threat posed by Iran, and the war in Iraq. Respondents were also asked about the way President George W. Bush was handling certain issues such as the economy, the energy situation, the war in Iraq, and terrorism, and whether or not they approved of his overall job performance. The survey also asked for opinions about Vice President Dick Cheney, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, and Senator John McCain. The next section of the survey addressed the government's response to Hurricane Katrina and the evacuation and rebuilding of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. Additional questions solicited opinions about wiretapping, Vice President Cheney's hunting accident, Islam, and a federal gasoline tax. Background information on respondents includes military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #2, January 2007

Source: CBS News;

Owner: ICPSR 21920

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp2_Jan07

Year: January 2007

Status: A

Description: This call-back poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. This survey, fielded January 10, 2007, is a call-back of the January 1-3, 2007, cohort CBS NEWS MONTHLY POLL #1, JANUARY 2007 (ICPSR 21360). A subset of respondents were re-interviewed immediately after President George W. Bush's speech to the nation on January 10, 2007. Those who had watched the speech were asked whether they approved of the president's plans concerning the war in Iraq. All call-back respondents were asked whether they had confidence in President Bush's ability to make the right decisions on the war in Iraq, what the United States should do now in Iraq, the likelihood of stability in Iraq in the near future, their views on the Iraqi government, and whether the president should have to get the approval of Congress to increase the number of United States troops in Iraq. This data collection also includes responses to the original poll conducted a week earlier. Topics in the original poll addressed the newly elected United States Congress, the condition of the national economy, the Iraq war, as well as respondents' opinions of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, and the potential 2008 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, military service, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, and the presence of children and household members between the ages of 18 and 24.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #2, March 2004

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4016

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSMP2MAR04

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded March 30-April 1, 2004, is part of a series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on political and social issues. Views were sought on the war with Iraq, the 2004 presidential campaign, and President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, the economy, and foreign affairs. Questions were posed regarding the condition of the national economy, whether the country was moving in the right or wrong direction, and whether the respondent or a household member had lost his or her job in the past year. Respondents were asked whether the result of the war with Iraq and the removal of Saddam Hussein from power was worth the human and economic costs, whether the United States made the right decision in taking military action against Iraq, how long troops would remain in Iraq, the success of the war on terrorism, and whether Saddam Hussein was personally involved in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. A series of questions asked whether the policies of the Bush administration made the United States safer or less safe from terrorism, whether the administration focused too much on the Iraq war and not enough on al Qaeda terrorists, and whether the Clinton and Bush administrations and United States intelligence agencies did all they could to prevent the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Respondents were asked how closely they followed the news about the hearings investigating the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, whether the White House cooperated with the hearings, and whether members of the Bush administration told the entire truth about what they knew prior to the terrorist attacks. Respondents were also polled on how much attention they were paying to the 2004 presidential campaign, the likelihood that they would vote, whether they would vote for President George W. Bush or Democratic candidate John Kerry, whether their minds were made up, whether they had seen or heard any of the presidential campaign commercials in the last month, and the effect of each candidate's election on the economy and terrorism. Other topics addressed privacy issues associated with the use of supermarket customer loyalty cards, the controversy surrounding the death of Princess Diana of Wales, life on Mars, and outer space travel. Background information includes sex, age, religion, religiosity, marital status, education, ethnicity, household income, political party affiliation, political orientation, number of telephone lines in household, whether the respondent or a family member served in the United States armed forces, and voter registration and participation history. Date Added: 10-14-2004

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #2, March 2009

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 26945

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp1Mar09

Year: March 2009

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded March 20-22, 2009, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way Barack Obama was handling the presidency and issues such as the economy, the financial institutions bailout, insurance company AIG bonuses, and foreign policy. Views were sought on the condition of the national economy, and the level of confidence in Secretary of the Treasury Tim Geithner's handling of the financial crisis. Respondents were also asked their views on companies receiving federal bailout money, whether they approved of the federal government providing money to banks and other financial institutions, whether the media, President Obama, and Congress was spending to much time on the bonuses paid to AIG executives, and whether Congress was spending the right amount of time trying to solve the nation's economic problems. Several additional questions addressed AIG including whether AIG could have found a way not to pay bonuses to their executives, whether the federal government should try to recover the money used for bonuses, how many of the executives respondents thought would return the bonuses, and whether the federal government should give additional financial assistance to AIG if needed. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, marital status, education level, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, and voter registration status and participation history.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #2, September 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4625

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp2_Sep06

Year: September 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded September 24-27, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Despite being termed a monthly poll, this poll's specific focus was on the opinions and judgments of people currently living in the state of New York. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the upcoming 2006 election for the New York governor, specifically their opinions about gubernatorial candidates, Eliot Spitzer and John Faso. Subjects were also asked about the upcoming New York senatorial election and their opinions about that race's candidates, Hillary Clinton and John Spencer. Respondents were also asked about the upcoming election for state attorney general and their opinions about candidates Andrew Cuomo and Jeanine Pirro. Respondents were asked to give their opinions about several politicians: President George Bush, Governor George Pataki, Senator Charles Schumer, Senator Hillary Clinton, and Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Respondents were asked how they thought the New York legislature in Albany was handling its job, and of the problems facing New York State, what they wanted the next governor to concentrate on most. Respondents were also asked to rate the state of the New York economy. Respondents were then asked to give their opinion on sentencing for people convicted of murder and terrorism. Other major issues such as gay marriage and the war in Iraq were also covered, along with additional topics specific to New York such as balancing the budget, future terrorist attacks, education, taxes, and which candidate for senator would help improve on these areas. Additionally respondents were asked which candidate for Senator cared most for people in different areas of New York: New York City, the suburbs, and upstate New York. Respondents were also asked how they thought the candidates for governor would handle issues such as taxes, terrorism, and the economy. Additional questions asked respondents how they would categorize the political attitudes of the candidates for governor and senator. Their opinions were sought on Hillary Clinton's job as senator, whether she had become a true New Yorker, and the prospect of her running for president, and whether Rudolph Giuliani, Michael Bloomberg, or George Pataki should run for president in 2008. Respondents were asked their views on Andrew Cuomo and Jeanine Pirro, including information about their campaign practices and their experience level. Lastly, they were asked if they would want the Mets or the Yankees to win if there were a subway World Series that year. Demographic variables include race, sex, age, level of education, financial situation, income, voter registration, voting activity, status, political ideology, party affiliation, marital status, religious affiliation, and number of years living in their current community.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #3, January 2007

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 21921

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp3_Jan07

Year: January 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded January 18-21, 2007, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency. They were also asked to give their opinions on other issues such as foreign policy, to rate the condition of the national economy, to identify the most important problem facing the country, and to say whether they approved of the way Congress was handling its job. Opinions were solicited on the newly elected Congress, whether the United States was ready to elect a woman or a Black president, and which candidates respondents would vote for in the 2008 presidential race. A series of questions asked for respondents' opinions of Vice President Dick Cheney, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, and the potential 2008 Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Information was collected on the Iraq war, including whether the United States did the right thing in taking military action against Iraq, whether the number of United States troops should be increased, whether Congress should block funding for the war in Iraq, how important a stable democracy in Iraq is to the security interests of the United States, and whether the United States' involvement in the Iraq War is comparable to its involvement in the Vietnam War. Information was also collected on whether respondents watched or listened to President Bush's speech earlier in the month on the war in Iraq, whether they were going to watch President Bush's State of the Union address on January 23, and which issues they would like Bush to spend more time talking about. Additional topics include the Social Security system, tax cuts, the Duke University lacrosse team sexual harassment case, embryonic stem cell research, abortion, global warming, immigration, and racial bias within the United States criminal justice system. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, and the presence of children and household members between the ages of 18 and 24.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll #3, March 2005

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4323

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSMP3_MAR05

Year: March 2005

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions about the most important problems facing this country, abortion, who should have the ultimate decision about a feeding tube of a patient in a vegetative state, the Terri Schiavo case, the Schiavo case being sent to the United States Supreme Court, congressional and presidential involvement in the Schiavo case, government decisions on life support issues, reasons the Schiavo bill was passed, future involvement of Congress in the lives of United States citizens, and physician assisted suicide. Respondents were also asked their opinions about the president's handling of his job, the economy, and the situation in Iraq, as well as Congress's handling of its job. Other questions inquired about the respondents' following of the Schiavo case, the degree of the respondents' feelings toward issues related to the Schiavo case, their possession of a living will, respondents' religious service attendance, and views of themselves as evangelical Christians. Background information includes political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, which candidates they voted for in the 2004 presidential election, religion, age, race, education, marital status, income, and whether the respondents were parents.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll, April 2007

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 23442

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Codename: CBSmp-Apr07

Year:  April 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded April 9-11, 2007, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling his presidency and foreign policy, and were asked to rate the condition of the national economy, to identify the most important problem facing the country, and to say whether they approved of the way the United States Congress was handling its job. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and the potential 2008 presidential candidates, whether respondents had been paying attention to the 2008 presidential campaign, whether they were satisfied with the Democratic and Republican candidates running for nomination for president, and whether respondents were likely to vote in the Democratic or Republican presidential primary. Opinions were gathered about who respondents expected to win the Democratic and Republican nominations for president in 2008, Al Gore's position on the environment, and whether the Republican party's principles related to that of former President Ronald Reagan. Several questions were asked about the war in Iraq, including whether the United States did the right thing in taking military action against Iraq, whether the United States was right to remove Saddam Hussein, whether Congress should block funding for the war, and whether the United States should withdraw its troops from Iraq. Additional topics include Alberto Gonzales and the firings of United States attorneys by the Department of Justice, whether respondents had filed their income taxes, respondents' financial concerns, political campaign advertising on television, and the re-occurrence of Elizabeth Edwards' cancer and how it may affect presidential candidate John Edwards. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy,voter registration status and participation history, perceived social class, the presence of children under 18 and household members between the ages of 18 and 24, and whether respondents had any children planning to attend a four-year college.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll, August 2005

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4398

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSMPAug05

Year: August 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted August 29-31, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency and issues such as the economy and Hurricane Katrina. A series of questions focused on the effects of the recent rise in gasoline and oil prices, who or what was responsible, whether prices were expected to rise in coming months, and whether higher gasoline prices would change their travel plans, driving habits, future car purchases, or lead to household spending cuts. Questions involving the war in Iraq included whether it was worth the costs, whether President Bush was accurately describing the situation in Iraq, what the possible effects of a withdrawal of United States troops would be, and what was the likelihood that Iraq would become a stable democracy. Views were also sought on Supreme Court nominee John Roberts, including how important it was that the United States Senate understood his position on issues such as abortion before confirming his appointment, whether the Republican and Democratic parties would be able to work together to conduct a fair and non-partisan confirmation hearing, and whether he would be confirmed. Additional topics addressed airport security, the success of the United States' war against terrorism, Cindy Sheehan (the peace activist who camped outside President Bush's ranch in Texas), and how often respondents watched network television news programs. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, marital status, education level, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, religious preference, voter registration status, for whom the respondent voted in the 2004 presidential election, whether there were college students and children under 18 living in the household, and whether the respondent or a family member was currently in the United States armed forces.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll, June 2007

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 23445

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmp-June07

Year: June 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded June 26-28, 2007, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling the presidency and other issues such as the situation with Iraq, whether they approved of the way the United States Congress was handling its job, and whether they approved of the way Dick Cheney was handling his job as vice president. Information was collected on whether the United States was respected around the world, whether respondents considered Russia an ally of the United States, whether George W. Bush's foreign policies had made world leaders more likely to cooperate with the United States, and whether respondents were more likely to vote in a Democratic or Republican presidential primary or caucus. Opinions were solicited on the presidential candidates, on New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and on the 42nd President of the United States Bill Clinton. Respondents were asked how much attention they had been paying to the 2008 presidential campaign, whether the country needs a third political party, whether they were satisfied with the candidates running for the Democratic and Republican nomination for president, and which candidate they would vote for if the 2008 presidential election were being held that day. Respondents also were asked about political candidates and their religious beliefs, religious leaders influencing voters, whether it is important for candidates to have strong religious beliefs, and how important presidential candidates' spouses are. Additional topics included the war in Iraq, illegal immigration, respondents' image of New York City, the future of the next generation of Americans, and how respondents' own generation compared to their parents' generation. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, and the presence of household members between the ages of 18 and 24.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll, June 2010

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 31575

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSmpJun10

Year: June 2010

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded June 1-3, 2010, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they favored increased drilling for oil and natural gas off the United States coast, how much they heard or read about the collapsed oil platform and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, whether the recent oil platform collapse and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico was most likely an isolated incident, or mostly an indication of a broader problem with offshore drilling, and whether they approved or disapproved of the way the Obama Administration and BP were handling the oil spill. They were also asked whether they are planning to go to a wedding this June, whether they attended their high school prom, their favorite flavor of ice cream, whether there was any one particular teacher who made a difference in their life, and whether they did anything special to celebrate the Fourth of July. Information was gathered on respondent's first choice of restaurant for dining out, whom they believed was the most dangerous person in the world today, whether President Obama was born in the United States, what they thought of the generation of Americans that followed those who lived through World War II, and what respondents thought happens when people die. Respondents were also queried about which modern artist's work they would pick to own, what they thought about allegations of Lance Armstrong's use of performance enhancing drugs, which phrase could best replace "as American as apple pie", and what behavior they would indulge in if there were no side effects. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, military service, religious preference, marital status, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, and whether respondents thought of themselves as born again Christians.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll, March 2007

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 23023

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Codename: CBSmp-Mar07

Year: March 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded March 26-27, 2007, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. This poll oversampled people who were likely to vote in the Democratic presidential primaries. All respondents were asked to say whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, whether they had been paying attention to the 2008 presidential campaign, to give their opinions of potential 2008 presidential candidates, and who they would most like to see nominated in the race for the Democratic party's presidential nomination. Opinions were solicited on Elizabeth Edwards, the wife of Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards, and whether respondents had been paying attention to the news about her cancer reoccurrence, as well as whether John Edwards' presidential campaign would be affected by his wife's medical condition. Additional topics include breast cancer, firings of United States attorneys by the Justice Department and Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, withdrawing the troops from Iraq, and whether Iran was a threat to the United States. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, marital status, frequency of religious attendance, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, and the presence of children under 18 and household members between the ages of 18 and 24.

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Title: CBS News Monthly Poll, November 2001

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 3377

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBSMPNOV01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This poll is part of a continuing series of surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. The survey examined respondents' views about the war against terrorism and anthrax attacks, as well as respondents' feelings about flying. Those polled gave their opinions on the United States military campaign in Afghanistan, President George W. Bush's war against terrorism, and whether they thought life would be the same, better, or worse for the people of Afghanistan with the Northern Alliance in control of the capital. Respondents also expressed their views on the United States government's ability to capture Osama Bin Laden, to protect American citizens from future terrorist attacks, and to catch people who had been sending anthrax through the mail. The survey also queried respondents on eventual biological attacks and the differences between the way anthrax findings were handled in the Capitol building and in post offices. Other questions concentrated on respondents' feelings about flying and airport security. Respondents were asked whether they had traveled since September 11, whether they had cancelled any trips because of the terrorist attacks, whether they had plans to travel during Thanksgiving and Christmas, who should be responsible for airport security personnel, and the reason for the crash of American Airlines Flight 587 in New York City on November 12, 2001. Other questions examined respondents' opinions on the work of the United Nations, the national economy, and United States relations with Russia. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, education, race, religion, Hispanic descent, political party affiliation, political orientation, marital status, number of children in the household, and household income. DATE ADDED: 04-24-2003.

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Title: CBS News State of the Union Poll, September 1990

Source: CBS NEWS.

Owner: ICSPR 9620

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: CBS90_SEP

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This survey focuses on specific issues related to the United States' involvement in the Persian Gulf War, along with general topics such as the Bush presidency, whether the United States was heading in the right direction, foreign policy, Congress, and the economy. Respondents were asked about President Bush's handling of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, if the United States did the right thing by starting military actions against Iraq rather than waiting to see if economic sanctions worked, if there was personal concern over a possible terrorist attack in the United States, whether the war was a mistake, and whether the war was likely to be worth the cost in human life and resources. Respondents also offered opinions regarding their pride or lack of pride in the United States' actions in the Persian Gulf, the expected length of the war and number of casualties, and how the war was going for the United States. In addition, the survey posed a series of questions dealing with media coverage of the war and the possible holding back of information by the military, the involvement of women in ground combat, personal effects of the war on respondents, Israel's response to Iraqi missile attacks, effects of the war on the United States' economy and on the Bush administration's ability to deal with domestic problems, support for Gorbachev vs. support for Lithuania's breaking away from the Soviet Union, Bush's first two years in office compared to Reagan's, Dan Quayle, and the probability of voting for Bush or the Democratic candidate in 1992. Background information on respondents includes political alignment, education, religion, age, race, sex, employment, perspectives on homemaking, family members serving in the Persian Gulf or elsewhere, choice for president in 1988, voter registration status, marital status, and state/region of residence.

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Title: CBS News/ New York Times/ Soviet Institute for Sociological Research Survey of M

Source: CBS News/ New York Times/ Soviet Institute/A. Hagen, CSSCR

Owner: ICPSR 9111

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Codename: USSOV88

Year: 1988

Status: A

Description: In this survey Muscovites were questioned on national and international issues. Opinions were sought on Soviet-American arms negotiations and security issues, Soviet foreign policy, and quality of life in the US and the Soviet Union, perestroika, glasnost, and other issues. In addition, respondents were asked for their opinions on Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Brezhnev, Krushchev, Stalin, Trotsky, and Bukharin. Age, sex, and education of the respondent were also recorded. Class IV (SPSSx Control Cards and Save File generously created by Ms. Andrea Hagan of CSSCR).

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Title: CBS News/60 Minutes/Vanity Fair National Poll, April #1, 2013

Source:  CBS News; 60 Minutes; Vanity Fair

Owner: ICPSR 34997

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBS13A_VF

Year:  April #1, 2013

Status: A

Description: This poll, the first of two fielded in April of 2013, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on a range of political and social issues. Respondents were asked their opinions on legalization of marijuana, gun control, patriotism, voting behavior, relation to someone with cancer, parenting, consumer behavior, and least important right granted by the Constitution. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, marital status, education level, household income, type of residential area (e.g. urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voting behavior, whether respondents were registered to vote, religious affiliation, and whether respondents thought of themselves as born again Christians.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Clinton/Dole Comparison Poll, June 1996

Source: CBS News;The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4510

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CBS_Clinton96

Year: June 1996

Status: A

Description: This special topic poll, fielded May 31-June 3, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinion of President Bill Clinton and his handling of the presidency, and of various issues such as foreign policy and the economy. Opinions were solicited on the condition of the national economy, what was the most important problem facing respondents and their families, their communities, and the country, how much the president could help with those problems, and whether they approved of the way Congress was handling its job. Respondents were asked whether they had been paying attention to the 1996 Presidential campaign, which candidate they would vote for if the presidential and United States House of Representatives elections were being held that day, and to give their opinions of Senator Bob Dole, First Lady Hillary Clinton, and Speaker of the House of Representatives Newt Gingrich. Several questions asked whether respondents leaned more toward Bill Clinton or Bob Dole based on specific issues, such as unemployment, family values and illegal drugs, whether it is better to have a president from the same political party that controls Congress, and whether the campaigns of Bill Clinton and Bob Dole have been more positive than past presidential campaigns. Respondents were asked whether they knew about the Clinton's past involvement in the Arkansas real estate development called Whitewater, whether the Clintons were trustworthy, whether the Whitewater issue was of great importance to the nation, and whether the verdicts in the Whitewater trial of Bill Clinton's former business partners affected their opinion of Bill Clinton. A series of questions asked about issues dealing with crime, including whether crime increased in the country and in respondents' communities within the last year, teenage crime, whether respondents or their family members had been the victim of a crime within the last year, whether the respondent's community was safe for women and children, what was the most important cause of crime, whether parents should be held legally accountable for their school-aged children's crimes, and whether respondents would approve of a curfew for children under the age of 18 within their community. Information was also collected on whether respondents considered themselves part of the religious right movement, and whether they listened to political call-in radio shows. Additional topics included abortion, the environment, the government, taxes and the budget deficit, job and financial security, and union involvement in political campaigns. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, voter registration status and participation history, household income, religious preference, household union membership, political ideology, political party affiliation, political philosophy, whether respondents had any children under the age of 18, and whether respondents had any children entering the ninth grade in the fall.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #1, January 2006

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4610

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Codename: CBSnytmp1-Jan06

Year: January 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted January 5-8, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country is facing, the national economy, the war in Iraq, abortion, and affirmative action. Respondents were also asked about the way President George W. Bush was handling certain issues, such as the economy, the war in Iraq, and terrorism and whether or not they approved of the overall job performance of President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, and the United States Congress. The survey queried respondents about the ethics and corruption in political parties and their confidence in the government to protect them from terrorism. The survey also contained questions about the Supreme Court, and the nomination of Samuel Alito. The next section of the survey addressed the Patriot Act, wiretapping by government agencies, airport security, and immigration. Additional questions solicited opinions on foreign and domestic automobiles and television viewing habits. Background information on respondents includes military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

Media: FTP

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #1, July 2006

Source: CBS News; The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4620

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Codename: CBSnytmp1-July06

Year: July 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted July 21-25, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency, the economy and the situation in North Korea, whether they approved of the way the United States Congress was handling its job, whether things in the country were going in the right direction, and what was the most important problem the country was facing. Opinions were collected on the condition of the national economy and whether respondents would vote for the Republican candidate or the Democratic candidate if the election for United States House of Representatives were being held that day. Several questions asked for respondents' opinions of Vice President Dick Cheney, former first lady Hillary Clinton, Arizona Senator John McCain, former Vice President Al Gore, the Republican and Democratic parties, the Bush administration, and the country of Israel. Respondents were asked whether the government had a positive impact on most people's lives, whether there was a mutual respect between George W. Bush and leaders of other countries, whether it was a good idea for the president to have the authority to make changes in rights guaranteed by the Constitution during wartime, and whether they thought the Bush administration went too far in restricting people's civil liberties. A series of questions asked about the war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism, how much respondents knew about the United States government holding suspected terrorists at the military prison in Guantanamo Bay, and whether the United States should follow international agreements for treatment of prisoners of war. Additional topics addressed gasoline prices, the federal minimum wage, illegal immigration, stem cell research, the conflict between Israel and Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, and the development of weapons in North Korea. Demographic information includes voter registration status and participation history, political party affiliation, political philosophy, marital status, sex, religious preference, education level, age, household income, race, whether respondents had any children under the age of 18, and the presence of household members between the ages of 13 and 24.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #1, July 2010

Source: CBS News; The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 32506

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Codename: CBSNYT1_Jul10

Year: July 2010

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded July 5-8, 2010, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on a range of political and social issues. Respondents were asked how much attention they paid to the 2010 election campaign, how likely it was that they would vote in the 2010 election for Congress and whether they would vote for the Democratic or Republican candidate. Respondents were queried on how closely they had been following the World Cup soccer competition, whether the World Cup competition had made them more or less interested in soccer, whether they would rather live through a really hot summer or a really cold winter, whether they feel more or less relaxed over the summer than they do during other times of the year, whether they try to get a suntan in the summer, and whether they read more books during the summer. Respondents were also asked whether they thought BP's relief wells would stop the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico by August of 2010, whether they favored or opposed a policy passed in a Nebraska town which required businesses and landlords to verify that their employees and renters were in the United States legally, whether they would prefer to travel to the past or to the future if time travel existed, and whether they thought that Americans of "Generation Y", or people born after 1980 would have a better or worse quality of life than that of the baby boomers. Finally respondents were asked whether they voted in the 2008 presidential election and who they voted for, whether they voted for a United States House of Representative in the 2006 election and which candidate they voted for, what year was the most recent election of any kind that they had voted in, and how long they have been living at their address. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, marital status, education level, household income, employment status, religious preference, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, and whether respondents thought of themselves as born again Christians.

Media: FTP

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #1, March 2004

Source: CBS News, New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4015

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Codename: CBS-NYTMPMAR04

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted March 10-13, 2004, is part of a series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on political and social issues. Views were sought on the 2004 presidential campaign, as well as President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, foreign policy, the economy, the situation with Iraq, and the campaign against terrorism. Respondents were asked whether the country was going in the right or wrong direction, whether the result of the war with Iraq was worth the human and economic costs, whether Iraq was a threat to the United States prior to the war, and whether the United States made the right decision in taking military action against Iraq. Several questions asked whether the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, had a negative or positive impact on the economy, whether the economy and the respondent's own financial situation was better or worse than when President Bush first took office four years ago, and the effect of the Bush administration's policies on jobs, taxes, the country's level of safety from terrorism, and the cost of prescription drugs for the elderly. Opinions were solicited on the seriousness of the current budget deficit, how serious of a problem it would be in the future, and whether the tax cuts enacted in 2001 should be made permanent, even if they increased the budget deficit in the future. Respondents were also polled on how much attention they paid to the 2004 presidential campaign, the likelihood that they would vote, whether they planned to vote for President George W. Bush, Democratic candidate John Kerry, or Independent candidate Ralph Nader, whether they had made their mind up yet, who they expected to win, the issue they most wanted candidates to discuss, and whether it was acceptable to use images of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in political campaigns. A series of questions addressed respondents' level of confidence in the ability of President Bush and John Kerry to correctly handle an international crisis and make decisions about the national economy, and whether each candidate's election would increase jobs, improve the economy, protect the country from terrorism, and ensure the future of Social Security benefits. Those polled also gave their opinions of the Democratic and Republican parties, and Vice President Dick Cheney. Additional topics addressed whether homosexuality was a choice, whether respondents favored or opposed a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, whether laws regarding marriage and civil unions should be determined by state or federal governments, and whether the issue of gay marriage should be a part of the election campaign. Background variables include sex, age, education, ethnicity, household income, religion, marital status, number of other telephone lines in household, political party affiliation, political orientation, and voter participation and registration history. Date Added: 10-13-2004.

Media: FTP

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #1, May 2006

Source: CBS News;The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4616

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Codename: CBSnytmp1-May06

Year: May 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted May 4-8, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country was facing, the national economy, the war in Iraq, and how the respondent would rate the job performance of United States Congress and his or her representative in it. Respondents were also asked about the way President George W. Bush was handling certain issues such as the economy, foreign policy, the war in Iraq, terrorism, gas prices, and immigration, and whether they approved of his overall job performance. The survey also sought respondents' opinions of Vice President Dick Cheney, Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Vice President Al Gore, Senator John Kerry, John McCain, and the Republican and Democratic parties. Additional questions addressed immigration, a security fence between the United States and Mexico, global warming, the nuclear threat of Iran, and Medicare prescription drug plans. Background information on respondents includes military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious affiliation, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #2, April 2003

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 3823

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Codename: cbs-nytmp2apr03

Year:  April 2003

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted April 11-13, 2003, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his overall job performance, his handling of military action against Iraq, his expectations and priorities for the military action, and his handling of the economy. Respondents were asked whether Bush was paying as much attention to the economy as to the war in Iraq, whether he was respected by other foreign leaders, whether his administration had a clear plan concerning the war in Iraq, and whether his administration leaned toward military solutions when dealing with international crises and events. Respondents were also asked to rate the national economic situation, to provide their opinions on whether the economy was improving, and to comment on whether they kept track of world events. Respondents were queried on the most important issue facing the United States, whether the country was headed in a positive direction, whether they thought relations with European countries were better or worse compared to two years ago, whether they thought relations with non-European countries were better or worse compared to two years ago, which party (Democratic or Republican) was better at handling issues concerning the military, the economy, and terrorism, and whether they or an immediate family member had been or was currently a member of the United States military. Other questions focused on the policy of taking military action against a country that may pose a threat to the United States but has not taken any action yet, the involvement of the United States in changing foreign dictatorships, the appropriate role of the United States in international conflicts, whether North Korea was a threat to the United States, and whether any country posed a serious threat to the United States. Opinions were elicited on the effects of military action in Iraq, whether respondents approved of military action in Iraq, whether they felt the potential benefits were worth the possible costs of military and civilian casualties, how they viewed Iraq before the war, whether Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction, why no weapons of mass destruction had been found, whether not finding weapons of mass destruction and/or Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein meant the United States did not win the war, whether Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein was alive, whether Saddam Hussein was involved in the September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States, whether the United States government correctly assessed the amount of resistance the military would encounter from the Iraqi army, whether the number of casualties experienced by the United States military and Iraqi civilians were within expectations, how they viewed the short-term future of Iraq, and whether the United States was providing adequate humanitarian aid to the Iraqi citizens. Respondents were queried for their opinions on the impact of removing Saddam Hussein from power in the Middle East, whether the war against Iraq would bring democracy to the Middle East, the impact of the war against Iraq on the image of the United States in the Arab world, expectations of how long the United States military would be in Iraq, the extent of responsibility the United States had in Iraq, who was winning the war against terrorism, whether the Iraqi citizens were resentful toward the United States or happy that Saddam Hussein was removed from power, whether the war against Iraq was part of the war on terrorism, whether the war against Iraq would increase the threat of terrorism against the United States, and whether success in Iraq would increase the likelihood that the United States military would be sent to intervene in North Korea, Syria, or Iran. Background variables include, age, sex, political orientation, political ideology, marital status, religious orientation, education, ethnicity, family income in 2002, whether the respondent voted in the 2000 United States presidential election, and if so, for whom they voted.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, August 2006

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4622

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Codename: CBSmp2-Aug06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted August 17-21, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way President George W. Bush was handling the presidency and issues such as foreign policy and the economy. Views were sought on how well members of the United States Congress were handling their jobs, whether the country was going in the right direction, the most important problem facing the country, and the condition of the national economy. Opinions were collected on whether the United States did the right thing in taking military action against Iraq, how well it was doing in its efforts to bring stability and order to Iraq, and whether the United States had a responsibility to resolve conflict in the Middle East. A series of questions asked about the war on terrorism, the impact on the respondents' lives of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and whether respondents were willing to give up some personal freedoms to make the country safer from terrorism. They rated their confidence in the ability of the United States government to respond to natural disasters and protect its citizens from future terrorist attacks, and they answered a series of questions about local and federal government responses to Hurricane Katrina, how much progress had been made in rebuilding New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, and whether respondents knew anyone affected by Hurricane Katrina. Additional topics addressed global warming, racial/ethnic profiling of Arab Americans and other minorities, whether respondents had Internet access and visited Internet blog Web sites, and whether they considered themselves patriotic. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, the presence of children and household members between the ages of 13 and 24, and whether respondents considered themselves to be born-again Christians.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, January 2006

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4611

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Codename: CBSnytmp2

Year: January 2006

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted January 20-25, 2006, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions on the current direction of the country, the most important problem the country was facing, the national economy, the war in Iraq, abortion, and affirmative action. Respondents were also asked about the way President George W. Bush was handling certain issues, such as the economy, the war in Iraq, and terrorism, and whether or not they approved of the overall job performance of President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, and the United States Congress. The survey queried respondents about ethics and corruption in political parties and about their confidence in the government's ability to protect them from terrorism. The survey also contained questions about the United States Supreme Court, and the nomination of Samuel Alito. The next section of the survey addressed the Patriot Act, wiretapping by government agencies, airport security, and immigration. Additional questions solicited opinions on foreign and domestic automobiles and television viewing habits. Background information on respondents includes military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #2, October 2001

Source: CBS News/The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 3378

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Codename: CBS-NYTMP2OCT01

Year: 2001

Status:  

Description: This poll, conducted October 25-28, 2001, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, foreign policy, the economy, the war on terrorism, the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and the anthrax outbreaks, as well as their views on Congress and its handling of the anthrax outbreaks. Respondents were asked for their opinions on the direction the nation was headed, the state of the economy, the size of the federal government, whether the government wasted money, and whether they felt they could trust the federal government. A series of questions addressed the ongoing war on terrorism. Topics covered the goal of the war, whether the Bush administration had adequately explained the United States mission, and what the main goal should be, as well as whether respondents approved of the military attacks on Afghanistan. Those queried were asked whether they were confident that the United States government could capture/kill Osama bin Laden while maintaining the international alliance currently supporting their military efforts, how long they expected the attacks to last, whether this war was worth losing several thousand American troops, whether the United States should provide food and humanitarian aid to the people of Afghanistan, whether the military action would become more widespread, and whether those who opposed the operation should be permitted to hold protest marches and rallies. Respondent views were also sought on the political situation in the Middle East. Opinions were elicited on Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), the reasons for the United States' problems in the region, whether respondents supported the establishment of a Palestinian homeland, whether their sympathies lay with Israel or the Arab nations, whether the United States had explained the war on terrorism to the Arab world, and whether Saudi Arabia was considered an ally of the United States. Regarding the anthrax attacks, respondents were asked how closely they had followed the news about the anthrax outbreaks, whether the government would be able to catch the people responsible, whether the government was sharing the right amount of information with the public, whether public health officials were right to discourage doctors from prescribing the drug Cipro unnecessarily, whether respondents were concerned about a biological/chemical attack where they lived, and whether they were confident in the government's ability to protect its citizens from such attacks. Respondents also described their reactions to the recent terrorist attacks, including whether they had experienced nervousness and/or sleeplessness, lost a substantial portion of their income and/or their job, canceled any scheduled trips, and whether they were now spending more time with family and friends. Additional questions addressed the topic of airline safety. Survey items focused on whether the federal government and the airline industry had done enough to improve airline safety and exactly who should be responsible for airport security personnel. In addition, respondents indicated whether they were rooting for the New York Yankees or the Arizona Diamondbacks to win the World Series. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, marital status, political party, religion, employment status, children in household, education, race, Hispanic descent, and household income. DATE ADDED: 04-25-2003.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll #2, September 2001

Source: CBS News/The New York Times.

Owner: ICPSR 3352

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Codename: cbsmp2sep01

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, his ability to handle a crisis, and whether he had good judgment. Respondents were also asked to give their views on the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC. Questions focused on the condition of the nation's economy, federal spending on intelligence agencies, whether the United States should take military action in the wake of the terrorist attacks, and what the scope of any action should be, including use of ground troops, cruise missiles, and assassination attempts. Respondents were also asked about the likelihood that the terrorists would be caught, the possibility of another attack on the United States, and who was to blame for the attacks. Other questions focused on whether the United States should return to business as usual, whether the government had done enough to make the country more secure, and how willing respondents were to make sacrifices of time when flying. Respondents were asked additional questions regarding air travel in the United States and whether they might, in the wake of the terrorist attacks, surrender certain personal freedoms, such as having the government monitor the telephone calls and e-mail of ordinary Americans. Questions were also posed regarding immigration and the treatment of Arab Americans. Other topics included respondents' personal willingness to fly in an airplane, what the government should do to help the airline industry, personal opinions of New York City, opinions of the United States economy, whether the United States was in a recession, spending habits since the terrorist attacks, personal investments, and the effect the terrorist attacks had on personal investment. Background information on respondents includes age, gender, political party affiliation, military service, marital status, education, race, and income. Date Added: 07/25/2002.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #2, September 2005

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4401

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Codename: CBS_Sep05

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted September 9-13, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, foreign policy, the economy, the United States campaign against terrorism, the situation with Iraq, and the needs of the victims of Hurricane Katrina. Those polled expressed their opinion on whether they felt Bush was a strong leader that understood the problems facing the respondent. Respondents were also queried on how confident they felt about George W. Bush's ability to make the right decisions concerning the war in Iraq and dealing with the problems faced by those affected by Hurricane Katrina. Furthermore, respondents were asked how much they thought George W. Bush cared for Blacks, the poor, those affected by Hurricane Katrina, and people like the respondents, themselves. A series of questions asked the respondents if they would be willing to pay premiums to help the victims of Hurricane Katrina. These included more taxes and higher prices for gasoline. Additionally, a group of questions concerning gas prices asked how the prices affected the respondent, if the Bush Administration had a clear plan for keeping gas prices down, how much influence the president had in controlling gas prices, and if they thought gas prices would go up, down, or stay the same in the next few months. Respondents were also queried on what they felt about the appointment of Appeals Court Judge John G. Roberts to the United States Supreme Court, what they thought of him, his level of conservatism, and if the Senate should scrutinize him more since he was nominated for chief justice. Those queried were also asked about the war in Iraq including whether President Bush had a clear exit strategy for the American troops, and if the war was preventing him from dealing with domestic issues. Demographic variables include race, sex, age, level of education, income, voter registration status, political ideology, party affiliation, evangelical Christian, veteran status, and religion.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #4, October 2010

Source: CBS News; The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 33183

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Codename: CBSNYT4_Oct10

Year: October 2010

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded October 21-26, 2010, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on a range of political and social issues. A national sample, with an oversample of African Americans were asked whether they approved of the way Barack Obama was handling his job as president and the economy, whether they felt the country was going in the right direction, whether they approved of the way Congress was handling its job, how they would rate the condition of the national economy, and whether they thought the economy was getting better or worse. Respondents were queried on how likely it was that they would vote in the 2010 election for United States Congress, how much attention they have been paying to the 2010 election campaign, which candidate they would vote for, how enthusiastic they were about voting in the congressional elections, whether they thought their representative in Congress had performed their job well enough to deserve re-election, and whether they were willing to vote for someone from a different political party other than their own. Information was collected on how optimistic or pessimistic respondents were about the next two years with Obama as president, how often they thought they could trust the government in Washington to do what is right, whether they preferred a smaller government with fewer services or a bigger government with more services, how important it was to them to reduce government spending, and whether they thought the economic downturn was temporary and would eventually fully recover or it is part of a long-term permanent decline that would never fully recover. Respondents were asked who they thought deserved the most blame for the current state of the economy, whether they had a favorable opinion of the Republican Party, the Democratic Party, Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Nancy Pelosi, and John Boehner, whether they thought Obama had a clear plan for creating jobs, and how much progress they thought Obama had made in making health care affordable for all Americans, improving the economy, and ending the war in Iraq and in Afghanistan. Respondents were queried on whether they thought the media was harder on Obama than other presidents, which party they thought was more likely to improve the health care system, create new jobs, and reduce the federal budget deficit, whether they thought it was a good idea to let the tax cuts passed in 2001 expire for households earning over $250,000 a year, whether they thought Congress should repeal the health care law, and whether they favored or opposed raising the age to receive social security benefits if it were necessary in order to continue paying benefits. Respondents were asked whether they have heard of the Republican "Pledge to America", whether they thought Republicans would repeal the health care law if they were to win control of the United States House of Representatives, whether they would try to make permanent tax cuts on households earning $250,000 a year or more, whether they thought Obama, the Democrats and the Republicans in Congress should compromise on some of their positions in order to get things done, whether they had a favorable opinion of the Tea Party movement, what their impression was on how the war in Afghanistan was going, whether they thought race relations in the United States are generally good or bad, and whether they favored or opposed allowing gay men and lesbians to serve openly in the military. Finally, respondents were asked how important it was to them to limit the amount of money election campaigns can spend, how important it was to them that campaigns be required by law to disclose how much money they have raised and from whom the money came from, whether their family's financial situation was better today than it was two years ago, whether they were concerned that they or someone in their household might be out of work in the next year, whether they were concerned about losing their home in the next year, whether they voted in the 2008 presidential election and the 2006 United States House of Representatives election, whether they were a supporter of the Tea Party movement, and how long they have lived at their current residence. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, marital status, education level, household income, social class, employment status, religious preference, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, and whether respondents thought of themselves as born again Christians.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll #5, October 2004

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4228

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Codename: CBS-NYTOct04

Year: October 2004

Status: A

Description: This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of the 2004 presidential campaign and the candidates, and the way George W. Bush was handling certain issues such as the economy, prescription drug costs, the war in Iraq, and terrorism. Respondents were also asked about their opinions of both George W. Bush and John Kerry and which candidate they favored in the election. The survey also included questions about various issues of the campaign such as health care and social security, their opinions of Governor Jeb Bush and the Florida economy, and government response to hurricanes. Background information on respondents includes union membership, military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, April 2005

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 2828

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Codename: CBS-NYTMPApr05

Year: April 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted April 13-16, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency and issues such as the economy and the campaign against terrorism. Respondents were asked how well the United States Congress and their own representatives were doing their jobs, and gave their opinions of the Republican and Democratic parties, House Majority Leader Tom Delay, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, and the late Pope John Paul II. Respondents voiced their concerns about the most important problem facing the country, whether the United States did the right thing by taking military action against Iraq, and how well the United States was doing to restore stability in Iraq. A set of questions addressed the recent death of Pope John Paul II, the Catholic church and priesthood, the church's handling of the sexual abuse of children by priests, and the position the next Pope should take on issues such as birth control and the ordainment of women. Additional topics focused on abortion, Social Security, the Patriot Act, the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, the use of stun guns, gasoline prices, and laws regarding life and death. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, religious affiliation, frequency of religious service attendance, political party affiliation, political philosophy, education level, marital status, household income, voter registration and participation history, gun ownership, and whether there were children in the household.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, August 1988

Source: CBS News. THE NEW YORK TIMES

Owner: ICPSR 9108

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Codename: CBS88_AUG

Year: 1988

Status: A

Description: This data collection is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluates the Reagan presidency and solicits opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Topics covered include nuclear arms treaties between the United States and the Soviet Union, the constitutional amendment requiring the federal government to balance its budget, the law requiring companies to give workers 60 days notice of plant closings, attention paid to the Democratic National Convention, the Equal Rights Amendment, organized prayer in public schools, and federal money spent on AIDS education. In addition, respondents were queried about their views on the candidates and campaigns for the 1988 presidential election. Questions asked of respondents include whether they had a favorable or unfavorable opinion of the presidential and vice-presidential candidates, whether Bush or Dukakis would be more competent at managing the federal government and whether the respondent had any worries about electing either as president, whether Jesse Jackson should have a major role in the Democratic presidential campaign, and whether George Bush was hiding something the public should know concerning the Iran-Contra affair. Background information on individuals includes party affiliation, age, union membership, income, sex, religious preference, education, and race.;

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, December 2007

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 24363

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Codename: CBSnytmp-Dec07

Year: December 2007

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded December 5-9, 2007, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling the presidency and other issues such as foreign policy. They were also asked to rate the condition of the national economy, what they thought was the most important problem facing the country, and whether they approved of the way Congress was handling its job. Opinions were solicited on the Republican and Democratic parties, the 2008 presidential candidate nominees, how much attention respondents had been paying to the 2008 presidential campaign, which candidate they would vote for if the 2008 presidential election were being held that day, and how enthusiastic they were about voting in the 2008 presidential election. Several questions asked about the presidential primaries, including whether respondents were likely to vote in the Democratic or Republican primaries, which nominee they would like to see as the Democratic and Republican party presidential candidate in 2008, whether their choice was affected by Oprah Winfrey's involvement in Barack Obama's campaign or Bill Clinton's involvement in Hillary Clinton's campaign, the importance of a presidential candidate's personal attributes or beliefs, and which candidate they thought would win the general election in November 2008. Respondents were also asked about their personal finances and credit card use, payments, and debt, other types of personal debt, the national debt, the United States' debt to China, and the quality of manufactured goods produced in China. Additional topics included abortion, global warming, illegal immigration, whether Iran is a threat to the United States, terrorism, the war in Iraq, international trade, democracy, and feelings about the federal government. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, marital status, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, and the presence of children in the household under 18.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, February 2005

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4318

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Codename: CBS-NYTMPFeb05

Year: February 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll conducted February 24-28, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly polls that solicit opinions on the presidency and on other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to assess the performance of United States President George W. Bush relative to the issues concerning national economy, the conflict in Iraq, North Korea, Iran, education, the national deficit, health care, terrorism, taxes, and international affairs. Respondents were further asked to proffer the most important issue facing the country, the priorities of the administration related to domestic issues, the most important foreign policy issue, and the foreign policy priorities of the administration. Additional queries were of respondents' views on same sex unions, abortion, social security, prescription drug costs, and whether the country was headed in the right direction. Multiple questions addressed various issues surrounding Social Security, retirement, health care, and Medicare. One such question was whether Medicare should cover or pay for erectile dysfunction drugs such as Viagra. Respondents were asked for their opinions on the conflict in Iraq, the possible threat of North Korea, and the possibility or probability of Iran building nuclear weapons and how that would affect the United States. Additional questions asked respondents to describe their experiences with the health care system and health care professionals. Background information includes age, education, ethnicity, frequency of religious participation, household income, the last year the respondent voted, marital status, number of children in the household, political ideology, political party affiliation, race, religious affiliation, voter registration status, whether the respondent considered herself or himself an evangelical, and whether the respondent voted in the 2004 United States presidential election, and if yes, for whom.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, January 1990

Source: CBS NEWS.

Owner: ICPSR 9497

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Codename: CBS90_JAN

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This data collection is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluate the Bush presidency and solicit opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Topics covered include Bush's political orientation, comparison of Bush and Reagan, Bush's greatest accomplishment/biggest failure in his first year, Bush's concern for the needs and problems of Blacks and of people like the respondent, whether Bush is in charge of what goes on in his administration, whether Bush has made the United States a kinder, gentler nation, and whether Bush will continue sending American troops into other countries to overthrow dictators. Additionally, respondents were questioned regarding foreign policy, the national economy, the drug problem, abortion, the environment, taxes, the homeless, Social Security, the Iran-Contra affair, corruption in Congress, federal spending on defense, how a potential peace dividend should be used, nuclear war, the cold war, women in combat, the invasion of Panama, Noriega's trial, and relations with China. They were also asked for their opinions of the Republican and Democratic parties, congressional representatives, and Dan Quayle. Demographic information collected includes sex, age, race, education, family income, religion, ethnicity, political orientation, party preference, and voting behavior.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, January 2004

Source: CBS News

Owner: ICPSR 4011

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Codename: CBS_NYTMPJAN04

Year: January 2004

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted January 12-15, 2004, is part of a series of monthly polls that solicit public opinion on political and social issues. Views were sought on the 2004 presidential campaign, as well as President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, the economy, the situation with Iraq, and the campaign against terrorism. A series of questions addressed whether President Bush was a strong leader, whether he was more interested in protecting the interests of ordinary Americans or large corporations, whether world leaders respected him, and whether he legitimately won the 2000 presidential election. Respondents were asked about the condition of the national economy, whether things were better or worse than five years ago, whether reductions in federal taxes enacted since 2001 were good for the economy, and whether the county was going in the right direction. Several questions asked about the amount of progress made by the Bush administration in improving the economy, reducing the cost of prescription drugs for the elderly, preserving Social Security and Medicare, improving public schools, and protecting the United States from terrorism, and the effect of its policies on taxes, jobs, and the United States image in the Arab world. Views were also sought on the Bush administration's handling of the war with Iraq, whether it focused too much on Iraq and not enough on al Qaeda terrorists, whether it hid any information about the possible existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, whether the war with Iraq made the United States safer from terrorism, and whether it was worth the human and economic costs. Respondents were also polled on how much attention they paid to the 2004 presidential campaign, whether they planned to vote for President Bush or a Democratic candidate, who they expected to win, which issue they most wanted candidates to discuss, and whether it was appropriate for presidential candidates to discuss the role of religion in their lives. Respondents were asked who the Democratic party should nominate as its presidential candidate, the main reason respondents wanted that person to be nominated, and whether they planned to vote in a Democratic or Republican primary. Opinions were solicited on Vice-President Dick Cheney, the Republican and Democratic parties, the United States Congress, and Democratic presidential nominees Carol Moseley-Braun, Wesley Clark, Howard Dean, John Edwards, Dick Gephardt, John Kerry, Dennis Kucinich, Joe Lieberman, and Al Sharpton. Additional topics addressed included immigration, government spending on space exploration, mandatory testing of students in public schools, and the likelihood that respondents would watch President Bush's State of the Union address the following week. Background variables include sex, age, ethnicity, marital status, religion, religiosity, education, household income, number of telephone lines in household, political party affiliation, political orientation, and voter participation and registration history.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, January 2005

Source: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, January 2005

Owner: ICPSR 2827

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Codename: CBS-NYTMPJan05

Year: January 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted January 14-18, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency and issues such as the campaign against terrorism and the situation in Iraq. Those polled stated their opinions of Vice President Dick Cheney and the Republican and Democratic parties, how well the United States Congress was doing its job, and whether things were currently going better in the United States than five years ago. Respondents voiced their concerns about the most important problem facing the country, the condition of the national economy, their own household's financial security, and whether various things such as the federal budget deficit would be different by the end of President Bush's second term in office. Views were sought on Iraq's upcoming elections, how much the Bush Administration knew about the presence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq prior to the war, whether military action should have been taken against Iraq, and whether the United States was winning the war on terrorism. Additional questions focused on abortion, Social Security and other retirement savings, federal income tax cuts, the recent flat tax rate proposal, the type of Supreme Court Justices that President Bush would be likely to nominate, the upcoming presidential inauguration, the recent tsunami in South Asia, and the effect of new technologies on respondents' lives. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, household income, education level, political party affiliation, political philosophy, religious affiliation, marital status, whether there were children in the household, and for whom the respondent voted in the 2004 presidential election.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, June 2005

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4330

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Codename: CBSMPJun05

Year: June 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted June 10-14, 2005, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the current presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of President George W. Bush and his handling of the presidency, foreign policy, the situation with Iraq, terrorism, and Social Security. Those polled also expressed their opinion on various topics regarding Social Security, including its future, if it will have money available when the respondent retires, whether the Democrats, Republicans, or George W. Bush have a proposal to change Social Security, and which party was more likely to make the right decision about it. Additionally, they were asked whether it was the government's responsibility to provide a decent standard of living for the elderly. The issue of self investment in Social Security was also raised. Respondents were asked if they thought it was a good idea to allow individuals to invest portions of their Social Security taxes themselves. Other questions were asked in regards to this topic, including whether the respondent thought it would be okay if the government had to borrow two trillion dollars to set up a program in which members could invest their Social Security taxes on their own. Another question asked if the respondent was opposed to or favored tax increases to help the Social Security program. A series of questions focused on the respondent's current savings goal, any difficulty in paying bills, and plans for retirement was also queried. Demographic variables include race, sex, age, level of education, income, voter registration status, political ideology, party affiliation, marital status, religious affiliation, and whether a member of the household is in college.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, March 2008

Source: CBS News; The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 26146

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Codename: CBSmp_Mar08

Year: March 2008

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded March 28 to April 02, 2008, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling the presidency and the economy, the most important problem facing the nation, and how much attention they were paying to the 2008 presidential campaign. Several questions addressed the economy and sought opinions on the condition of the national economy, the most important economic problem facing the nation, whether the United States was in an economic recession and whether the economy was getting better or worse. Registered voters were asked whether they were more likely to vote in a Democratic or Republican primary or caucus, which candidate they supported and why, who they expected to win the Democratic nomination, their opinions of the candidates, and for whom they would vote if the election was held that day. Views were also sought on Senator Barack Obama's former minister Rev. Jeremiah Wright's statements and whether his statements affected the respondent's opinions of Obama. Respondents were asked how concerned they were about several aspects of their personal finances including being able to afford health care, housing, and retirement costs, college tuition, and whether they were concerned about their job security. Respondents were also asked about their biggest economic concern, whether they were getting ahead financially, whether they had made cutbacks in their spending, and whether rises in food prices was affecting them. Additional questions asked respondents whether they had any close friends or relatives who filed for bankruptcy or had a foreclosure in the past year, whether they had any money invested in the stock market, and whether they thought investment in the stock market was safe. Other topics addressed the war in Iraq, the home mortgage crisis, estate and income tax, trade restrictions, and race relations. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, employment status, marital status, whether respondents had children under 18 years of age, household income, political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status and participation history, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, and whether respondents considered themselves to be a born-again Christian.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, March-April 1990

Source: CBS NEWS.

Owner: ICPSR 9498

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Codename: CBS90_MAR_

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This data collection is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that evaluate the Bush presidency and solicit opinions on a variety of political and social issues. Topics covered include foreign policy, the drug problem, the environment, the federal budget deficit, term limits for members of the House of Representatives, the political party most likely to promote prosperity, the political party that cares most about the needs and problems of Blacks, Bush's concern for the needs and problems of Blacks, the peace dividend, capital punishment, relations with the Soviet Union and Lithuania, financial assistance to Lithuania and to countries in Latin America that have turned toward democracy, the Cold War, German reunification, and troop levels in Western Europe. Additionally, respondents were questioned regarding government funding of day care services and long-term medical care, national health insurance, abortion, their party preferences in the 1990 election for House of Representatives and in the 1992 presidential election, and their opinions of George Bush, Dan Quayle, Ronald Reagan, Jesse Jackson, Louis Farrakhan, the Republican and Democratic parties, and Mikhail Gorbachev. Demographic information collected includes sex, age, race, education, family income, religion, ethnicity, political orientation, party preference, voting behavior, recycling habits, day care enrollment, parental status, health insurance status, and labor union membership.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES Monthly Poll, May 1994

Source: CBS News/The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 6596

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Codename: CBS_MAY94

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Besides the standard questions on President Bill Clinton's performance, a series of questions was included focusing on the theme of taking responsibility, in terms of both people in the United States government and the general population. Respondents were asked if they thought that most people in government positions were willing to take responsibility when things go wrong and, if they say they are taking responsibility, whether they say so to avoid fixing the problem. Additional questions asked whether people today were willing to take responsibility when they had done something wrong, whether it's wrong to make excuses to get out of personal and civic responsibilities, whether the respondent had ever invented excuses to avoid responsibility, and what the best excuse was that they had ever given. Respondents' opinions on crime, criminal trials, and criminal defenses were addressed in detail, and opinions on specific cases, including the Lorena Bobbitt and Eric and Lyle Menendez criminal trials, were solicited. Background information on respondents includes voter registration status, household composition, vote choice in the 1992 presidential election, political party, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, religious preference, and family income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Monthly Poll, May 2008

Source: CBS News; The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 26162

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Codename: CBSmp_May08

Year: May 2008

Status: A

Description: This poll, fielded May 1-3, 2008, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Opinions were sought on how well George W. Bush was handling the presidency and the condition of the national economy. Respondents were asked how much attention they were paying to the 2008 presidential campaign, who they would vote for if the election were held that day, whether they were more likely to vote in a Democratic or Republican primary or caucus in their state, who they wanted to see as the Democratic or Republican nominee, their level of support for this candidate, and who they expected to actually win the election. Respondents gave their opinions of Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama, and Republican presidential candidate John McCain. Other questions addressed the treatment of the candidates by the news media and the respondent's knowledge of the religious faith of the candidates. Opinions were also sought on Barack Obama's former minister Reverend Jeremiah Wright's statements and whether his statements affected the respondent's opinions of Obama, how well Obama handled the situation, the degree of influence Reverend Wright had on Obama's spiritual and political views, whether Obama shared Wright's feelings toward the United States, whether Wright's comments would affect how they voted in November, whether the media spent an appropriate amount of time covering the situation, and why Obama decided to renounce his ties to Reverend Wright. Additional questions asked about removing federal tax on gasoline during the summer months and whether the respondent ever disagreed with the statements made by their own religious leader. Demographic variables include sex, age, race, education level, marital status, political party affiliation, political philosophy, household income, voter registration status and participation history, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, and whether respondents considered themselves to be a born-again Christian.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times National Survey, April #2, 2013

Source: CBS News; The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 34999

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Codename: CBS13A_NY

Year: April #2, 2013

Status: A

Description: This poll, the last of two fielded April 2013, is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on a range of political and social issues. Respondents were asked how Barack Obama was handling the presidency, foreign policy, the national economy, the threat of terrorism, the federal budget deficit, immigration, and gun policy. Multiple questions asked respondents how Congress was handling their job, including whether they thought members of Congress were interested in serving the people they represent or special interest groups, and whether they had favorable opinions of the Republican and Democratic parties in Congress. Opinions were also collected on the condition of the national economy, and which party respondents trusted to make the right decisions. Further questions asked respondents about their opinion of Islam, and whether they believed it encouraged violence. Respondents were also asked multiple questions about immigration, including whether terrorism has increased as a result of legal immigration, who they trusted more to make the right decisions concerning immigration, whether legal immigration should be increased, decreased, or stay the same, and whether respondents would vote for a candidate who does not share their view on immigration. Respondents were also asked multiple questions about the federal budget deficit including who they trusted more to make the right decisions, what effect it would have on the national economy, and how they would reduce the deficit. Additional topics included the budget sequestration, gun laws, the bombings at the Boston Marathon, and terrorism. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, marital status, education level, household income, religious preference, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, and whether respondents thought of themselves as born-again Christians.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES National Surveys, 1981

Source: CBS News. THE NEW YORK TIMES

Owner: ICPSR 7991

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Codename: CBS81

Year: 1981

Status: A

Description: The datasets described below are part of an ongoing data collection effort in which The New York Times and CBS News are equal partners. The common substantive denominator in the surveys is a continuing evaluation of the Reagan presidency, but each data collection has other questions of topical relevance or pertaining to broader social issues, such as childrearing or victimization. These national surveys are administered by telephone to a respondent selected from eligible household members. All of the files are available in OSIRIS and card -image format, with three cards per case. Part 1: January 1981. 1,512 respondents were asked for their views on Reagan's likely performance as President in economic and foreign affairs, about the release from Iran of the hostages, and for their views on the federal budget, including for which programs funding should be decreased or increased. Questions about busing for school integration were also included. Part 2: April 1981. 1,439 respondents were asked how Reagan has been performing and is likely to perform in economic and foreign affairs. There were questions about the tax cut, the federal budget, and on women's rights, El Salvador, Poland, handguns, and Japanese cars. Part 3: June 1981. 1,433 respondents were asked to evaluate Reagan's performance as President, also about their general life satisfaction, their confidence in government institutions, their views on crime, about their vote (turnout) in 1980, about social security revisions, and also about various topical issues in foreign affairs, e.g., military rule in Poland. Part 4: June 1981, Social Security. 1,467 respondents gave their views on the social security system and how proposed changes affected them. Respondents were also queried for their views on childrearing, how juvenile crime should be punished, and who should have custody of children in divorce situations. Part 5: September 1981. 1,479 respondents evaluated Reagan's performance in economic and foreign affairs, and also gave their views on environment issues and on various economic proposals, including the tax cut.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES National Surveys, 1982

Source: CBS News. THE NEW YORK TIMES

Owner: ICPSR 9053

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Codename: CBS82

Year: 1982

Status: A

Description: These seven datasets are part of an ongoing data collection effort in which CBS News and The New York Times are equal partners. A common denominator of the surveys is a continuing evaluation of the Reagan administration's handling of economics and foreign affairs. In addition, each of the surveys has a special focus on a topical issue or event such as the Israeli-Lebanese conflict, El Salvador, or ERA. These national surveys were administered by telephone, one respondent was selected from eligible household members for the interview. The sampling technique is a variation of random digit dialing techniques and is more fully described in ''Sampling Methods for Random-Digit Dialing,'' Journal of the American Statistical Association (73) March 1978, pp. 40-46. Weights are given in each file which must be used for any analysis. There are two sets of weights in the September and October surveys. The first is the standard demographic weight and the second was created by adjusting for probability of voting. These data and accompanying documentation are distributed by ICPSR in the same form as received from the principal investigators. For reasons of confidentiality, the telephone exchange has been converted to missing data by ICPSR. The datasets are in card-image format. A brief description of each of the seven parts follows. 1. The January Survey. Conducted Jan. 11-Jan. 15, 1982. N=1,540. There are 55 questions, comprising an evaluation of the Reagan presidency and standard CBS demographic or background variables. 2. The March Survey. Conducted March 11-March 15, 1982. N=1,545. The 61 questions asked in this survey include a number on El Salvador, as well as the usual background questions and those asking the respondent to evaluate the policies of the Reagan administration. 3. The May Survey. Conducted May 19-May 23, 1982. N=1,470. The 55 questions include a strong emphasis on the nuclear freeze movement. 4. The June Survey: Part 1. Conducted June 26-June 27, 1982. N=985. This survey contains only a small set of background variables, and several questions about the Israeli-Lebanese conflict and Alexander Haig's resignation as Secretary of State. For this part of the collection, CBS News was the sole principal investigator. 5. June Survey: ALL. Conducted June 26-June 28, 1982. N=1,174. This survey has approximately 30 items. Most of the non-background items are about the ERA and women's movement. Although this part of the survey includes the respondents from the June Survey: Part 1, CBS News recommends that the two surveys NOT be combined. For this part of the collection, CBS was the sole principal investigator. 6. September Survey. Conducted Sept. 13, 1982-Sept. 18, 1982. N=1,664. This survey and the October Surveys are pre-election surveys and include a number of questions relating to the forthcoming Congressional elections, evaluation of Reagan administration policies, the political parties, and the impact of various issues on the elections. There are about 70 items in the questionnaire, including the standard background items. The dataset includes a weight adjusted for probability of voting. 7. October Survey. Conducted Oct. 23-Oct. 28, 1982. N=2,111. This survey, like the September survey, focuses on the upcoming Congressional elections. It includes a weight adjusted for probability of voting. Past voting behavior as well as current voting intention are elicited.

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Title: CBS News/NEW YORK TIMES New York State Poll, February 2005

Source: CBS News, The New York Times

Owner: ICPSR 4317

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Codename: CBS05_Feb

Year: Feb. 2005

Status: A

Description: This poll is part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicit public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked to give their opinions of the 2004 presidential election, the candidates, political parties, the way United States President George W. Bush was handling certain issues (such as the economy, the war in Iraq, and terrorism), and how they felt about Bush's next term. Respondents were also asked about their opinions of both George W. Bush (Republican) and John Kerry (Democrat) and which candidate they favored in the election. The survey also included questions about various issues of the campaign such as social security, tax cuts and tax rates, same-sex marriage, abortion, religion in schools and politics, pop culture and its influence, and physician assisted suicide. Background information on respondents includes union membership, military service, voter registration status, party identification, marital status, sex, religious preference, education record, age, ethnicity, and income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times O.J. Simpson Poll #1, July 1994

Source: CBS News/The New York Times.

Owner: ICPSR 6601

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Codename: OJ0794

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This special topic poll focused on the American criminal justice system in general and specifically on the O.J. Simpson murder trial. Respondents were asked how closely they followed recent news about O.J. Simpson and the murders he was charged with. Respondents were also asked whether the criminal justice system was biased toward persons accused or against them, how much confidence they had that the American criminal justice system generally makes the right decisions about guilt and innocence, and, when wrong decisions are made by criminal justice system, who they thought was most responsible: prosecutors, judges, defense attorneys, or juries. The role of the media and whether they had been too harsh or too easy in coverage of the O.J.Simpson trial were additional topics covered. Background information on respondents includes voter registration status, household composition, vote choice in the 1992 presidential election, political party, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, religious preference, and family income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times O.J. Simpson Poll #2, July 1994

Source: CBS News/The New York Times.

Owner: ICPSR 6602

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Codename: OJ07942

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This special topic poll focused on the American criminal justice system in general and specifically on the O.J. Simpson murder trial. Respondents were asked whether the criminal justice system and the media were biased toward O.J. Simpson and other Blacks or against them, and whether the trial affected the way white people view Black men. Additional race-related questions asked respondents whether they thought there would be more media coverage or less if a white celebrity had been accused of the same crimes as O.J. Simpson or if O.J. Simpson had been accused of murdering two Black people. The role of the news media and whether they had been too harsh or too easy in their coverage of the O.J. Simpson trial was also explored. The respondents' feelings about Simpson were probed in questions that asked how much sympathy they had for him because of everything that had happened, and if, before the murders, they had personally thought of him as a role model. Background information on respondents includes voter registration status, household composition, vote choice in the 1992 presidential election, political party, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, religious preference, and family income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times O.J. Simpson Poll, June 1994

Source: CBS News/The New York Times.

Owner: ICPSR 6600

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Codename: OJ0694

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This special topic poll focused on the O.J. Simpson murder trial, including the role of the news media. Respondents were asked whether the media had done a good or bad job covering the case, whether they had spent too much or too little time on stories about O.J. Simpson and the two victims in the case, whether the stories the news media had reported about the case were mostly accurate, and whether the news media had been too harsh or too easy in their treatment of Simpson. Background information on respondents includes voter registration status, householdcomposition, vote choice in the 1992 presidential election, political party, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, religious preference, and family income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Teenage Problem Poll, May 1994

Source: CBS News/The New York Times.

Owner: ICPSR 6597

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Codename: TEEN0594

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This special topic poll queried American teenagers on the problems they face. Specific topics included drugs, crime, guns, teen pregnancy, alcohol, AIDS, and racism. Respondents were asked about problems with school, peer pressure, their opinions on the future of American teenagers, and whether they personally knew anyone who had been shot in the past five years. Other questions asked teens whether their parents were divorced, separated, or together, how likely it was that they themselves would be divorced in the future, and whether they would consider becoming a single parent. Background information on respondents includes household composition, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, and religious preference.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times Tonya Harding Hearing Poll, February 1994

Source: CBS News/The New York Times.

Owner: ICPSR 6220

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Codename: HARDING029

Year: 1994

Status:  A

Description: This special topic poll focused on figure skater Tonya Harding's disciplinary hearing by the United States Figure Skating Association. Questions covered the sport of figure skating in general, and the actions of the United States Figure Skating Association and the United States Olympic Committee in particular. Respondents were also asked to give their personal opinions of Tonya Harding, injured figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, and Harding's boyfriend, Jeff Gillooly. Background information on respondents includes voter registration status, household composition, vote choice in the 1992 presidential election, political party, political orientation, education, age, sex, race, religious preference, and family income.

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Title: CBS News/New York Times/Tokyo Broadcasting System Collaborative National Surveys

Source: CBS News/New York Times/Tokyo Broadcasting System

Owner: ICPSR 8880

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Codename: USJ86

Year: 1986

Status:  A

Description: In these surveys respondents in both the United States and Japan offered opinions on national and international issues. Respondents in the United States were asked to evaluate Reagan's performance as president, United States naval actions off the coast of Libya, and the situation in Latin America with special emphasis on Nicaragua. They were also asked to compare the Democratic and Republican parties. In addition, American respondents were asked a series of questions relating to United States- Japanese relations, restrictions on imports, the trade imbalance, the upcoming economic summit in Tokyo, United States relations with its allies and its position international trade. Japanese respondents were asked to respond to this last series of questions with a few variations. They were also queried regarding their political orientation and their support or nonsupport for the Nakasone cabinet. Both surveys contain demographic information on respondents. CLASS IV

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Title: CBS News-Tokyo Broadcasting System Collaborative National Surveys of the United

Source: CBS News-Tokyo Broadcasting System

Owner: ICPSR 9105

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Codename: USJ88

Year: 1988

Status: A

Description: This poll, conducted jointly by CBS News and the Tokyo Broadcasting System, posed similar sets of questions to respondents in both Japan and the US. In both countries, opinions were sought on Ronald Reagan, Mikhail Gorbachev, Japanese-American amity, the economic performance of the US, Japanese military strength, Japanese-American trade relations, the relative quality of goods produced by the US and Japan, the relative quality of high technology produced by the US and Japan, and Japanese and other foreign investment in the US. Japanese and American respondents were also questioned about their political preferences and support of political parties in their respective countries. Japanese respondents only were asked for their opinions of Jesse Jackson, Michael Dukakis, and the Takeshita government. American respondents were asked to recall the most important day of their lives, and were asked to answer a series of questions concerning marriage and weddings. Bothe surveys obtained demographic and socioeconomic information on the respondents.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1987: Finance Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 9484

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Codename: COG87FS

Year: 1987

Status:  

Description: In this data collection finance data on revenues, expenditures, indebtedness and debt transactions, and cash and security holdings are provided for state and local governments. Revenue data are provided by source. Expenditures are shown by function such as education, highways, and public welfare, as well as by type, including intergovernmental, current operation, and capital outlay. Indebtedness data show outstanding debt by type of debt, and debt transactions. Asset data are shown by purpose and type of financial asset. Financial statistics of employee retirement systems and of utilities operations by state and local governments are included within the data record of the performing or parent government. Data are provided for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. File A provides data for governmental units, including the federal government and state, county, municipal, township, special district, and independent school district governments, as well as regional education service districts. File B includes data on counties. File C provides national and state area summations. File D contains educational finance data pertaining to all public elementary-secondary school systems and selected higher education institutions.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1992: Employment Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4419

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Codename: CG92Emp

Year: 1992

Status: A

Description: The Census of Governments, a complete census of United States government units, is conducted at five-year intervals by the Census Bureau. Detailed financial and employment statistics are collected on the federal government and over 80,000 states, counties, municipalities, townships, and school and special districts in the United States. Two important components of the Census of Governments series are the Employment Statistics and Finance Statistics data collections. The Employment Statistics files contain employment and payroll figures by function. Full- and part-time employment and payrolls for various governmental functions are provided. The Finance Statistics files report finance data on revenues, expenditures, indebtedness and debt transactions, and cash and security holdings. These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1992: Finance Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4420

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Codename: CG92Fin

Year: 1992

Status: A

Description: Summary Description: The 1992 census covers the entire range of government financial activities (revenue, expenditure, debt, and assets). The census survey results yield a series of tables and files that provide users with comprehensive statistical information about state and local government economic activity. Data in these tables and files pertain to the governments' 12-month fiscal years. The data for 1992 reflect individual government fiscal years that ended between July 1, 1991 and June 30, 1992. The statistics in these tables and files are in terms of current dollar amounts. They have not been adjusted for price level changes occurring through the years. The amounts are presented as thousands of dollars. The Census of Governments, a complete census of United States government units, is conducted at five-year intervals by the Census Bureau. Detailed financial and employment statistics are collected on the federal government and over 80,000 states, counties, municipalities, townships, and school and special districts in the United States. Two important components of the Census of Governments series are the Employment Statistics and Finance Statistics data collections. The Employment Statistics files contain employment and payroll figures by function. Full- and part-time employment and payrolls for various governmental functions are provided. The Finance Statistics files report finance data on revenues, expenditures, indebtedness and debt transactions, and cash and security holdings.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1992: Government Organization File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4421

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Codename: CG92Org

Year: 1992

Status: A

Description: Census statistics on governments are designed to account for the totality of public sector activity without omission or duplication. Governmental services in the United States are provided through a complex structure made up of numerous public bodies and agencies. In addition to the Federal Government and the 50 State governments, the Bureau of the Census recognizes five basic types of local governments. Of these five types, three are general purpose governments -- county and subcounty general purpose (municipal and township) governments -- school district governments and special district governments. The Census of Governments seeks to identify all local governments and to conduct a survey of their organization and activities. The Organization survey seeks to obtain descriptive information on the basic characteristics of governments. Most data for public schools, except data on the area served by each system, were obtained from the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. Data on the area served were obtained from the Local Government Directory Survey. The 1992 Local Government Directory Survey covered all county, municipal, town or township, school district, and special district governments that met the Census Bureau criteria for independent governments. The counts of local governments reflect those in operation on January 1, 1992. The survey was conducted by mail over a 6 month period beginning in October 1991. These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1997: Employment Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4422

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Codename: CG97Emp

Year: 1997

Status: B

Description: This survey provides data for March 1997 on full-time and part-time employment, part-time employee hours worked, full-time equivalent employment, and payroll statistics by type of government (state, county, city, township, special district, and school district), and by governmental function (elementary and secondary education, higher education, police protection, fire protection, financial administration, other government administration, judicial and legal, highways, public welfare, solid waste management, sewerage, parks and recreation, health, hospitals, water supply, electric power, gas supply, transit, natural resources, correction, libraries, air transportation, water transport and terminals, other education, state liquor stores, social insurance administration, and housing and community development). These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1997: Finance Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4423

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Codename: CG97Fin

Year: 1997

Status: B

Description: This phase of the Census of Governments provides finance data on revenues, expenditures, indebtedness and debt transactions, and cash and security holdings for state and local governments. Revenue data are provided by source. Expenditures are shown by function such as education, highways, and public welfare, as well as by type, including intergovernmental, current operation, and capital outlay. Indebtedness data show outstanding debt by type of debt, and debt transactions. Asset data are shown by purpose and type of financial asset. Some activities or transactions, such as those of private trusts, are excluded. These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Census of Governments, 1997: Government Organization File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4424

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Codename: CG97Org

Year: 1997

Status: B

Description: The organization phase of the census provides a universal list of government units, classified according to type of government, for use in the employment and finance phases of the census. Official counts of the number of state and local governments and tabulations of governments by state, type of government, size and county location are provided. The Government Integrated Directory is the master list of all governments in the United States, and is used in the Census Bureau's government statistical programs. Census statistics on governments are designed to account for all public sector financial and employment activity without omission or duplication. A government is an organized entity which, in addition to having governmental character, has sufficient discretion in the management of its own affairs to distinguish it as separate from the administrative structure of any other governmental unit.There were 87,504 governmental units in the United States as of June 1997 These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Census of Governments, 2002: Employment Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4425

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Codename: CG02Emp

Year: 2002

Status: B

Description: The United States Census Bureau conducts an Annual Survey of Government employment, as authorized by law under Title 13, United States Code, Section 182. Alternatively, every five years, in years ending in a "2" or "7", a Census of Governments, including an Employment portion, is conducted under Title 13, Section 161. For both the Census and the annual surveys, the employment detail is equivalent. There was no survey for October 1996. The 2002 employment phase of the census provide comprehensive findings on government employment and payrolls for March 2002. Census data for 2002 are available for approximately 87,000 state and local governments. In non-Census years, a sample survey of approximately 11,000-13,000 local governments and all state governments is conducted and estimates are developed.

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Title: Census of Governments, 2002: Finance Statistics

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4426

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Codename: CG02Fin

Year: 2002

Status: B

Description: The United States Bureau of the Census conducts a census of governments at 5-year intervals as required by law under Title 13, United States Code, Section 161. The census survey results yield a series of tables and files that provide users with comprehensive statistical information about state and local government economic activity. In non-census years the Annual Survey of Government Finance is conducted covering equivalent data detail. The amounts given in these files are in terms of current dollar amounts. They have not been adjusted for price level changes occurring through the years. The figures represent thousands of dollars. Any missing amounts are actually zero value. The data for 2002 reflect individual government fiscal years that ended between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2002. The Finance portion of the Census of Governments contain statistics on revenue, expenditure, debt, and assets (cash and security holdings) for governments. These are coded in the data files as "items." A brief meaning of the item codes is provided in the documentation. Additional information about these codes, as well as descriptions and definitions, can be found in the Governments Finance and Employment Classification Manual.

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Title: Census of Governments, 2002: Government Organization File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 4427

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Codename: CG02Org

Year: 2002

Status: B

Description: A census of governments is taken at 5-year intervals as required by law under Title 13, United States Code, Section 161. The 2002 Government Organization data sets are a product of the government organization phase of the census of governments, in which a universe list of governmental units, classified according to type of government, is established for use in the remaining phases of the census. Two major activities are involved in this phase: (1) research to update coverage in the universe list of local governments; and (2) the Local Government Directory Survey, to obtain additional information on the characteristics of local governments. These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Extract Data

Source: Adams, Terry K

Owner: ICPSR 9693

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Codename: cph80extract

Year: 1980

Status:  

Description: This extraction of data from 1980 decennial Census files (Census of Population and Housing, 1980: STF 3A and 3B) was designed to provide a set of contextual variables to be matched to any survey dataset that has been coded for the geographic location of respondents, such as the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, 1968-1988 (ICPSR 7439). These geographic area data can also be anlyzed independently with neighborhoods, labor market areas, etc., as the units of analysis. Over 120 variables were selected from the original Census sources, and more than 100 variables were derived from thsoe component variables. The variables characterize geographic areas in terms of population counts, ethnicitym family structure, income and poverty, education, residential mobility, labor force activity, and housing. The geographic areas range from neighborhoods, through internediate levels of geography, through large economic areas, and beyond to large regions. These variables were selected from the Census data for their relevance to problems associated with poverty and income determination, and 80 per cent were present in comparable form in both the 1970 and 1980 Census datasets.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: County Migration by Selected Characteristics, 1975-1980

Source: United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 8471

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Codename: CM1975-80

Year: 1975-1980

Status: A

Description: Gross in- and out-migration statisitcs are provided in this file for each county (or county equivalent) in the United States. Migrant data are stratified by age, race, and sex. Included for each race/sex/age group are data on college attendance, military status, group quarters status, residence abroad in 1975, and total population. Data on country of birth are listed for race/sex strata. Date added: 10-14-2004.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: County Population by Age, Sex, Race, and Spanish Origin

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 8108

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Codename: CPH80_ASRS

Year: 1980

Status:  

Description: This data collection from the Census Bureau contains summary statistics from the 1980 Census recorded for all counties and all independent cities in the United States. The file includes counts of persons by single years of age (up to 75 and over) by sex, race, and Spanish origin. Twenty-one Hispanic/racial groups arc reported for each geographic area. These groups are Total Population; Spanish (plus sub-groups of White, Black, American Indian, Asian, Indian, Other Specified, and Other Nonspecified Spanish); NonSpanish (including sub-groups of White, Black, American Indian, Asian Indian, Other Specified, and Other Nonspecified Non-Spanish); White; Black; American Indian; Asian Indian; Other Specified; and Other Nonspecified. Data for the entire country are contained in one file of 65,877 logical records. Each logical record has a length of 2,088 characters. CLASS IV

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: County Population by Age, Sex, Race, and Spanish Origin

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 8108

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Codename: CPH80_ASRS

Year: 1980

Status:  

Description: This data collection contains summary statistics from the 1980 Census recorded for all counties and all independent cities in the United States. The file includes counts of persons by single years of age (up to 75+ years) by sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Twenty-one Hispanic/racial groups are reported for each geographic area. These groups are total population, Hispanic (plus subgroups of white, Black, American Indian, Asian Indian, other specified, and other nonspecified Hispanic), non-Hispanic (including subgroups of white, Black, American Indian, Asian Indian, other specified, and other nonspecified non-Hispanic), white, Black, American Indian, Asian Indian, other specified, and other nonspecified. The file is sorted by county within each state. DATE ADDED: 10-30-2001.

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Title: CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 1980 [UNITED STATES]: MASTER AREA REFERENCE FILE (MARF) 2

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 8258

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Codename: cph80marf2

Year: 1980

Status:  

Description: MARF is the 1980 census counterpart of the Master Enumeration District List (MEDList) prepared for the 1970 census. It links State or State equivalent, county or county equivalent, minor civil division (MCD)/census county division (CCD), and place names with their respective geographic codes. It is also an abbreviated summary file containing selected population and housing unit counts. MARF 2 has the same geographic coverage as the first MARF and includes the following additional information: FIPS place codes, latitude and longitude coordinates for geographic areas down to the BG/ED level, land area in square miles for geographic areas down to the level of places or minor civil divisions (for 11 selected states) with a population of 2,500 or more, total population and housing count estimates based on sample returns, and per capital income for all geographic areas included in the file. There are 51 files: one for each state and the District of Columbia. The files each have a logical record length of 390 characters. The number of records varies with each file.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Public-Use Microdata Sample (B Sample): 1-in-1000 Sample

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 8211

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Codename: pumsb80_1p1000

Year: 1980

Status:  

Description: The Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) from the 1980 Census contain person- and household-level information from the ''long-form'' questionnaires distributed to a sample of the population enumerated in the 1980 Census. The B Sample contains information for each state, and for households and persons residing in metropolitan areas that are too small to be separately identified and/or that cross state boundaries. Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) and county groups are defined differently here than in the A Sample [CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 1980 [UNITED STATES]: PUBLIC USE MICRODATA SAMPLE (A SAMPLE): 5-PERCENT SAMPLE (ICPSR 8101)]. Most states cannot be identified in their entirety. As a percentage of the l-Percent Public Use Microdata Sample (B Sample) [CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 1980 [UNITED STATES]: PUBLIC USE MICRODATA SAMPLE (B SAMPLE): 1-PERCENT SAMPLE (ICPSR 8170)], this file constitutes a 1-in-1000 sample, and contains all household- and person-level variables from the original B Sample. Household-level variables include housing tenure, year structure was built, number and types of rooms in dwelling, plumbing facilities, heating equipment, taxes and mortgage costs, number of children, and household and family income. Person-level variables include sex, age, marital status, race, Spanish origin, income, occupation, transportation to work, and education.;

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Public-Use Microdata Samples, 5 percent data

Source: Bureau Of The Census

Owner: ICPSR 8101

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Codename: PUMS80

Year: 1980

Status:  A

Description: This file contains 5 percent sample data for Oregon State. This dataset contains income, employment, migration, etc., data for households and persons.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Summary Tape File 3A

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 08071

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Codename: STF3A80

Year: 1980

Status:  A

Description: Summary Tape File 3 consists of four sets of computer-readable data file containing detailed tabulations of the nation's population and housing characteristics produced from the 1980 census. The files contain sample data inflated to represent the total United States population. The files also contain 100% counts and unweighted sample counts of persons and housing units. This series is comprised of STF3A, STF3B, STF3C, and STF3D. All four files have identical tables and format except for the omission of 100% counts for population and housing in STF3B. STF3A, STF3B, AND STF3D have 51 separate files, one for each state, and the District of Columbia. STF3C consists of one nation-wide datafile containing information about all states. All files in the STF3 series are identical, containing 321 substantive data variables organized in the form of 150 ''tables,'' as well as standard geographic identification variables. Population items tabulated for each person include demographic data and information on schooling, ethnicity, labor force status, children, and details about occupation and income. Housing items include data on size and condition of the housing unit as well as information on value, age, water, sewage and heating, vehicles, and monthly owner costs. Each file provides different geographic coverage. STF3A provides summaries for the States or state equivalents, counties or county equivalents, minor civil divisions (MCDs) or census county divisions (CCDs), places or place segments within MCD/CCDs and remainders of MCD/CCDs, census tracts or block numbering areas (BNAs) and block groups (BGs) or, for areas that are not block numbered, enumeration districts (EDs), places, and Congressional districts. Each file has a logical record length of 12,096 characters with six physical record segments of 2,016 characters each. The number of data records in each file varies by state. An additional STF3A file for Puerto Rico is also available from ICPSR. The information in this file is similar to but not identical with the data for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. This file is documented in a separate codebook. NOTE TO USERS: ICPSR has all of the revised data for STF3A and STF3C files from the Census Bureau. In the event of any further corrections by the Census Bureau, ICPSR will announce the availability of corrected files in the ICPSR Bulletin. The Census Bureau's machine-readable data dictionary for STF3 is also available on the same tape as CENSPAC 3.2 (ICPSR #7789), the software package designed specifically by the Census Bureau for use with the 1980 Census data files. A description of CENSPAC is located in the Instructional Packages section of the Guide.;

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Summary Tape File 3B

Source: US Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census.

Owner: ICPSR 8318

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Codename: stf3b1980

Year: 1980

Status: A

Description: This data collection is a component of Summary Tape File (STF) 3, which consists of four sets of data files containing detailed tabulations of the nation's population and housing characteristics produced from the 1980 Census. The STF 3 files contain sample data inflated to represent the total United States population. The files also contain 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts of persons and housing units. All files in the STF 3 series are identical, containing 321 substantive data variables organized in the form of 150 "tables," as well as standard geographic identification variables. Population items tabulated for each person include demographic data and information on schooling, ethnicity, labor force status, and children, and details on occupation and income. Housing items include size and condition of the housing unit as well as information on value, age, water, sewage and heating, vehicles, and monthly owner costs. Each dataset provides different geographic coverage. Summary Tape File 3B provides summaries for each 5-digit ZIP-code area within a state, and for 5-digit ZIP-code areas within states which are contained within Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs), portions of SMSAs, or within counties, county portions, or county equivalents. All persons and housing units in the United States were sampled. Population and housing items include household relationship, sex, race, age, marital status, Hispanic origin, number of units at address, complete plumbing facilities, number of rooms, whether owned or rented, vacancy status, and value for noncondominiums. Each file has a conceptual logical record length of 12,096 characters with six physical record segments of 2,016 characters each. The number of records varies by state. The Census Bureau's machine-readable data dictionary for STF 3 is also available through CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 1980 [UNITED STATES]: CENSUS SOFTWARE PACKAGE (CENSPAC) VERSION 3.2 WITH STF4 DATA DICTIONARIES (ICPSR 7789), the software package designed specifically by the Census Bureau for use with the 1980 Census data files. Date added: 3/28/2002.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1980 [United States]: Summary Tape File 4A

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 8282

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Codename: STF4A80

Year: 1980

Status:  A

Description: Summary Tape File 4 consists of three sets of computer-readable data files containing highly detailed tabulations of the nation's population and housing characteristics produced from the 1980 census. The files contain sample data inflated to represent the total United States population. The files also contain 100 percent counts and unweighted sample counts of persons and housing units. This series is comprised of STF 4A, STF 4B, and STF 4C. All series have identical tables and format but differ in geographic coverage. Population items tabulated for each area include demographic data and information on schooling, ethnicity, labor force status, children, and details about occupation and income. Housing items include data on size and condition of the housing unit as well as information on value, age, water, sewage, heating, vehicles, and monthly owner costs.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [United States]: Equal Employment Opportunity File

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 9929

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Codename: CPH90EEO

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This file, the 1990 counterpart to the CENSUS OF POPULATION, 1980 [UNITED STATES]: EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY SPECIAL FILE (ICPSR 9026), is based on civilian labor force data from the 1990 Decennial Census and provides occupational and educational attainment data to support affirmative action planning for equal employment opportunity. The file consists of two sets of crosstabulations for the United States civilian labor force. The first set of tables provides data for 512 occupational categories by sex, race, and Hispanic origin. The second set presents educational attainment data for seven age groups by sex, race, and Hispanic origin. Both sets of tables are summarized geographically for the United States, all states and the District of Columbia, all counties and statistically equivalent entities, all Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Areas, and Primary Metropolitan Statistical Areas, all places with populations of 50,000 or more, and all minor civil divisions with populations of 50,000 or more in 12 states.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: 1/1,000 Sample

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 6497

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Codename: pums90_1p1000

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: This dataset, prepared by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, comprises 2 percent of the cases in the second release of CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 1990 [UNITED STATES]: PUBLIC USE MICRODATA SAMPLE: 5-PERCENT SAMPLE (ICPSR 9952). As 2 percent of the 5-percent Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS), it constitutes a 1-in-1,000 sample, and contains all housing and population variables in the original 5-percent PUMS. Housing variables include area type, state and area of residence, farm/nonfarm status, type of structure, year structure was built, vacancy and boarded-up status, number of rooms and bedrooms, presence or absence of a telephone, presence or absence of complete kitchen and plumbing facilities, type of sewage, water source, and heating fuel used, property value, tenure, year moved into housing unit, type of household/family, type of group quarters, household language, number of persons, related children, own/adopted children, and stepchildren in the household, number of persons and workers in the family, status of mortgage, second mortgage, and home equity loan, number of vehicles available, household income, sales of agricultural products, payments for rent, mortgage, and property tax, condominium fees, mobile home costs, and cost of electricity, water, heating fuel, and flood/fire/hazard insurance. Person variables cover age, sex, relationship to householder, educational attainment, school enrollment, race, Hispanic origin, ancestry, language spoken at home, citizenship, place of birth, year of immigration, place of residence in 1985, marital status, number of children ever born, presence and age of own children, military service, mobility and personal care limitation, work limitation status, employment status, employment status of parents, occupation, industry, class of worker, hours worked last week, weeks worked in 1989, usual hours worked per week, temporary absence from work, place of work, time of departure for work, travel time to work, means of transportation to work, number of occupants in vehicle during ride to work, total earnings, total income, wages and salary income, farm and nonfarm self-employment income, Social Security income, public assistance income, retirement income, and rent, dividends, and net rental income.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: 1/10,000 Sample

Source:  Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 6150

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Codename: CPH90PUMSC

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This dataset, prepared by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, comprises 1 percent of the cases in the second release of CENSUS OF POPULATION AND HOUSING, 990 [UNITED STATES]: PUBLIC USE MICRODATA SAMPLE: 1-PERCENT SAMPLE (ICPSR 9951). As 1 percent of the 1-Percent Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS), the file constitutes a 1-in-10,000 sample, and contains all housing and population variables in the original 1-Percent PUMS. Housing variables include area type, state and area of residence, farm/nonfarm status, type of structure, year structure was built, vacancy and boarded-up status, number of rooms and bedrooms, presence or absence of a telephone, presence or absence of complete kitchen and plumbing facilities, type of sewage, water source and heating fuel used, property value, tenure, year moved into house/apartment, type of household/family, type of group quarters, language spoken in household, number of persons, related children, own/adopted children, and stepchildren in the household, number of persons and workers in the family, status of mortgage, second mortgage, and home equity loan, number of vehicles available, household income, sales of agricultural products, payments for rent, mortgage, and property tax, condominium fees, mobile home costs, and costs for electricity, water, heating fuel, and flood/fire/hazard insurance. Person variables cover age, sex, and relationship to householder, educational attainment, school enrollment, race, Hispanic origin, ancestry, language spoken at home, citizenship, place of birth, year of immigration, place of residence in 1985, marital status, number of children ever born, presence and age of own children, military service, mobility and personal care limitations, work limitation status, employment status, employment status of parents, occupation, industry, and class of worker, hours worked last week, weeks worked in 1989, usual hours worked per week, temporary absences from work, place of work, time of departure for work, travel time to work, means of transportation to work, number of occupants in vehicle during ride to work, total earnings, total income, wages, and salary income, farm and nonfarm self-employment income, Social Security income, public assistance income, retirement income, and rent, dividend, and net rental income.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [United States]: Summary Tape File 4A

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 6117

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Codename: CPH90STF4A

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 4A contains sample data weighted to represent the total population. The collection also contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units. Additional population and housing variables include items such as age, ancestry, disability, citizenship, education, income, marital status, race, sex, travel time to work, hours worked, rent, persons in household, acreage of property, tenure, value of housing unit, number of vehicles, and monthly owner costs. Data are provided for states and their subareas in hierarchical sequence down to the block group level. Within STF 4A, data for each state are represented in one ''A'' record file and ten ''B'' record files. The ''A'' records have 123 population tables and 80 housing tables. These include five population tables and one housing table showing 37 categories of race, and five population tables and one housing table with 26 categories of Hispanic origin. Data are included for all persons for each summary level and geographic component level within a unit of geography. More detailed data are presented in 178 population and 85 housing tables in the ''B'' records. The ''B'' records include a separate file for all persons and up to nine separate race and Hispanic-origin files.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [United States]: Summary Tape File 4B

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 6271

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Codename: cph90stf4b

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: Summary Tape File 4B contains sample data weighted to represent the total United States population. The collection also contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units. Additional population and housing variables include items such as age, ancestry, disability, citizenship, education, income, marital status, race, sex, travel time to work, hours worked, rent, persons in household, acreage of property, tenure, value of housing unit, number of vehicles, and monthly owner costs. Data are provided for states (and the District of Columbia) and their county subareas. Within STF 4B, data for each state are represented in one ''A'' record file and up to 49 ''B'' record files. The ''A'' records contain 123 population tables and 80 housing tables. These include five population tables and one housing table showing 37 categories of race and five population tables and one housing table with 26 categories of Hispanic origin. Data are included for all persons for each summary level and geographic component level within a unit of geography. More detailed data are presented in 178 population and 85 housing tables in the ''B'' records. The ''B'' records include a separate file for all persons and up to 48 separate race and Hispanic-origin files.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [US]: Modified Age/Race, Sex, & Hispanic Origin (MARS) State and County Files

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 9878

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Codename: CPH90_MARS

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: The MARS file contains modified race and age data based on the 1990 Census. Both rave and age are tabulated by sex and Hispanic origin for several layers of geography. The rave data were modified to make reporting categories comparable to those used by state and local agencies. The 1990 Census included 9,804,847 persons who checked the "other race" category and were therefore not included in one of the 15 racial categories listed on the Census form. "Other race" is usually not an acceptable reporting category for state and local agencies. Therefore, the Census Bureau assigned each "other race' person to the specified race reported by another person geographically close with an identical response to the Hispanic origin question. Hispanic origin was taken into account because over 95 percent of the "other race" persons were of Hispanic origin. (Hispanic origin persons may be of any race.) The assignment of race to Hispanic-origin persons did not affect the Hispanic-origin category that they checked (i.e., Mexican. Puerto Rican, Cuban, etc.). Age data were modified because respondents tended to report age as of the date they completed the 1990 questionnaire, instead of age as of the April 1, 1990 Census date In addition there may have been a tendency for respondents to round up their age if they were close to having a birthday. Age data for individuals in households were modified by adjusting the reported birth-year data by race and sex for each of the 1990 Census's 449 district of offices to correspond with the national level quarterly distribution of births available from the National Center for Health Statistics. The data for persons in group quarters were adjusted similarly, but on a state basis. The age adjustment affects approximately 100 million people. In this file their adjusted age is one year different from that reported in the 1990 Census.

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Title: Census of Population and Housing, 1990 [US]: Subject Summary Tape File (SSTF) 1, The Foreign-Born Population in the US

Source: US Census Bureau

Owner: ICPSR 6211

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Codename: cph90sstf1

Year: 1990

Status:  

Description: SSTF 1 contains sample data weighted to represent the total population. In addition, the file contains 100-percent counts and unweighted sample counts for total persons and total housing units in the 1990 Census. Population variables include citizenship, ability to speak English, age, number of children ever born, class of worker, disability status, earnings in 1989, educational attainment, employment status, household size, industry, labor force status, language spoken at home, occupation, poverty status in 1989, school enrollment, and year of entry into the United States. Housing variables include gross rent, housing units, kitchen facilities, mortgage status, plumbing facilities, tenure, units in structure, and year householder moved into unit. The data are also crosstabulated and presented in a variety of tables. Crosstabulations include citizenship and year of entry by all other variables, age (groups) by sex by school enrollment or college enrollment or educational attainment and employment status, age by poverty status by sex, relationship by family type by subfamily type, and employment status by hours worked last week and year last worked. The dataset includes both ''A'' and ''B'' records. ''A'' records have three population (PA) and three housing (HA) tables. The ''B'' records present more detail in 66 population (PB) and 10 housing (HB) tables, and are divided into 22 segments of 8,142 characters each.

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Title: Census Tract Data, 1940: Elizabeth Mullen Bogue File

Source: Bogue, Donald.

Owner: ICPSR 2930

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: ctd1940embf

Year: 1940

Status: A

Description: The 1940 Census Tract files were originally created by keypunching the data from the printed publications prepared by the Bureau of the Census. The work was done under the direction of Dr. Donald Bogue, whose wife, Elizabeth Mullen Bogue, completed much of the data work. Subsequently, the punchcards were converted to data files and transferred to the National Archive and Records Administration (NARA). ICPSR received copies of these files from NARA and converted the binary block length records to ASCII format. Date added: 4/3/2002.

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Title: Census Tract Data, 1950: Elizabeth Mullen Bogue File

Source: Bogue, Donald

Owner: ICPSR 2931

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Codename: ctd1950embf

Year: 1950

Status: A

Description: The 1950 Census Tract files were originally created by keypunching the data from the printed publications prepared by the Bureau of the Census. The work was done under the direction of Dr. Donald Bogue, whose wife, Elizabeth Mullen Bogue, completed much of the data work. Subsequently, the punchcards were converted to data files and transferred to the National Archive and Records Administration (NARA). ICPSR received copies of these files from NARA and converted the binary block-length records to ASCII format. Date added: 4/3/2002.

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Title: Census Tract Data, 1960: Elizabeth Mullen Bogue File

Source: Bogue, Donald.

Owner: ICPSR 2932

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Codename: ctd1960embf

Year: 1960

Status: A

Description: The 1960 Census Tract files were originally created by keypunching the data from the printed publications prepared by the Bureau of the Census. The work was done under the direction of Dr. Donald Bogue, whose wife, Elizabeth Mullen Bogue, completed much of the data work. Subsequently, the punchcards were converted to data files and transferred to the National Archive and Records Administration (NARA). ICPSR received copies of these files from NARA and converted the binary block-length records to ASCII format. Date added: 4/3/2002.

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Title: Census Tract Data, 1970: Elizabeth Mullen Bogue File

Source: Bogue, Donald.

Owner: ICPSR 2933

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Codename: ctd1970embf

Year: 1970

Status: A

Description: The 1970 Census Tract files were originally created by keypunching the data from the printed publications prepared by the Bureau of the Census. The work was done under the direction of Dr. Donald Bogue, whose wife, Elizabeth Mullen Bogue, completed much of the data work. Subsequently, the punchcards were converted to data files and transferred to the National Archive and Records Administration (NARA). ICPSR received copies of these files from NARA and converted the binary block-length records to ASCII format. Date added: 4/3/2002.

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Title: Censuses of Religious Bodies,1906-1936

Source: US Dept of Commerce, Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 0008

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Codename: USCEN_REL

Year:  

Status: A

Description: Selected county and state level data on church membership by denomination, obtained from the special Censuses of Religious Bodies of 1906, 1916, 1926, and 1936 are contained in this file. There are approximately 260,000 card image equivalents. Class II. See also USCEN card.

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Title: Central and Eastern Euro-barometer 1: Public Opinion in Central and Eastern Europe, 1990

Source: Reif, Karlheinz, and George Cunningham.

Owner: ICPSR 6104

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Codename: CEEUROB1_90

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: This first round of Central and Eastern Euro-Barometer Surveys was undertaken during the reunification of Germany and after the announcement of independence by several Soviet states and the realignment of governments in Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Bulgaria. In an atmosphere of changed relations among the nations of Eastern and Western Europe, this survey attempted to assess Central and Eastern Europeans' awareness of and attitudes toward the European Community, its programs and activities, and issues facing all European nations. It also explored citizens' reactions to the political and economic reforms occurring in their own countries. Surveys were carried out in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Bulgaria, and the German Democratic Republic, as well as in the former Soviet Union. The Soviet Union samples were obtained from the Greater Moscow area and from the republics of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, Armenia, and Russia west of the Ural Mountains. In all surveys comprising Euro-Barometer 1, demographic data usually included the respondent's age, sex, level of education, family size, income, occupation, marital status, and religious denomination. In some places, mother tongue and self-described left-right political placement were also ascertained. In most countries, respondents were asked how they felt things were going in their country in general, how well their country's economy and their own finances had fared over the past year, whether they thought the establishment of a free market economy was right or wrong, and whether economic reforms and privatization were occurring too rapidly or too slowly. Satisfaction with the development of democracy and with their own place in their political systems was assessed. In some countries, respondents were asked about their intention to vote in the next general election. Respondents in all countries were asked how frequently they thought of themselves as European, and about their level of trust toward citizens of other European countries. They expressed opinions for or against the reunification of Germany and the unification of Western Europe. They were also asked to indicate how aware they were of, and how interested in, the European Community and its activities and institutions, and to rate how positively they regarded the European Community and the prospect of their country's membership in the Community. Country-specific questions were asked regarding sources of information about the European Community. Several items concerned respondents' reliance on various types of information media, including foreign broadcasts. Participants were also asked about how the economy, government, and private citizens might be advantaged or disadvantaged by their country's increasing ties with the European Community. DATE ADDE: 04-28-2004.

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Title: Central and Eastern Euro-barometer 4: Political and Economic Change, November 1993

Source: Reif, Karlheinz, and George Cunningham.

Owner: ICPSR 6466

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Codename: CEEB4-1993

Year: 1993

Status: A

Description: The fourth round of Central and Eastern Euro-Barometer surveys was carried out in Albania, Armenia, Belorus, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM), Poland, Romania, European Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Ukraine. The surveys assessed public support for the European Union as well as for political and economic change by asking respondents to comment on conditions within their own countries, the financial situation of their households as compared to 12 months ago and their expectations for the next year, and their attitudes toward a market economy, general economic reforms, and the process of privatizing state enterprises. Respondents were also queried about their level of satisfaction with the way democracy was developing in their country, how much respect there was for human rights, and the nations or organizations they felt the future of their country was most closely tied to. Demographic data collected on participants varied from country to country and included information such as age of the household head, education, age when education finished, occupation, marital status, employment status, religion, mother tongue, ethnic background, vote intention, political party preference, union membership, left/right political placement, sex, household composition, region, and income.;

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Ncases: 16,716


Title: Central and Eastern Euro-barometer 5: European Union, November 1994

Source: Reif, Karlheinz, and George Cunningham

Owner: ICPSR 6656

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Codename: CEEB5-1994

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: The Central and Eastern Eurobarometer (CEEB) surveys were begun in 1990, when nationally representative surveys were undertaken in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Poland, and the Soviet Union. The surveys, which explore individuals' attitudes toward democratic and economic reform, have been conducted in the autumn of each year since. An extension of the Eurobarometer series conducted semiannually in the member nations of the European Community (EC), the Central and Eastern Eurobarometers also focus on public support for the EC and on other issues facing Europe as a whole. After the first wave of research, the number of countries has been variably expanded to reflect then-current political alignments and realities of access for survey researchers. For the second wave of research (CEEB 2), the number of countries surveyed was 10, while CEEB 3 and 5 were conducted in 18 countries, CEEB 4 in 16, and CEEB 6 in 19. In each of the countries surveyed, approximately 1,000 persons aged 15 and over were interviewed in their own homes. Note that beginning with CEEB 6, the archival survey titles in this ICPSR series no longer contain a hyphen separating ''Euro'' and ''Barometer,'' in keeping with current usage. Other archives may follow different naming practices for this survey series.

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Title: Chicago Area Transportation Survey (CATS) 1990 Household Travel Survey

Source: Ghislandi, Anne, Chicago Area Transportation Study; Fijal, Alan, Chicago Area Transportation Study;

Owner: ICPSR 34908

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Codename: CATS90

Year: 1990

Status: A

Description: The purpose of the 1990 Chicago Area Transportation Survey (CATS) was to survey households in the area surrounding Chicago to collect information on travel in the area. Respondents were asked to report detailed information regarding their travel, including trip locations, mode of transportation, trip start and end times, trip purpose, and trip activities. Demographic variables include gender, age, employment status, occupation, whether the respondent was a student, and income.

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Title: Chicago Lawyers Survey, 1975

Source: Heinz, John P., and Edward O. Laumann

Owner: ICPSR 8218

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Codename: CLS75

Year: 1975

Status:  A

Description: The American Bar Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the National Science Foundation funded this study which contains information collected in 1975 on attorneys in Chicago. The purpose of this data collection is to describe and analyze the social organization of the legal profession in Chicago. Several major aspects of the legal profession are investigated here: the organization of lawyers' work, the social stratification within the local (Chicago) Bar Association, prestige within the profession, lawyers' personal values, career patterns and mobility, networks of association, and the 'elites' within the profession. The data were collected based upon a stratified sample with simple random selection of elements within strata using Sullivan's Law Directory as a primary source, and as a supplementary source, Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory. The universe is all attorneys in the city of Chicago who are non-retired and not recent graduates from law school (one year) who had law offices. Interviews were completed by 777 attorneys, and the dataset contains approximately 870 variables. The logical record length of the data records is 1,221 characters.

Media: CSSCR_CD0002

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Title: China One-Per-Thousand Fertility Survey

Source: State Family Planning Commission (SFPC), China

Owner: International Statistical Institute

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: COPTFS82

Year: 1982

Status: A

Description: This survey was conducted in 28 provinces and municipalities in conjunction with the third national population census, 1 July 1982. The aim of the survey was to measure the fertility levels and trends and the impact of family planning programmes. By including women to an upper age limit of 67 it was possible to obtain some retrospective information on fertility levels before the founding of the People's Republic. A survey of the resident population, covering 1,017,574 persons, was conducted to select eligible women for the One-Per-Thousand Survey. However, the household and individual survey are not linked, and no matched file can be created.

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Ncases: 1,017,574


Title: Chinese Health and Family Life Survey

Source: William Parish and Edward O. Laumann

Owner: University of Chicago/NORC

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: CHFLS

Year: 1999-2000

Status:  

Description: Contemporary China is on the leading edge of a sexual revolution, with tremendous regional and generational differences that provide unparalleled natural experiments for analysis of the antecedents and outcomes of sexual behavior. This study provides a baseline from which to anticipate and track future changes, thus providing opportunity for a public health benefit as well as scholarly return. Specifically, this study produces a baseline set of results on sexual behavior and disease patterns, using a nationally representative probability sample. It is one of the first omnibus studies of sexual behavior in a developing country. Topical areas include childhood sexual contact, intimate partner violence, forced sex, sexual harassment, body image concerns, sexual well-being, and sexually transmitted diseases and risk behavior. More information is also available at http://www.src.uchicago.edu/prc/chfls.php.

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Title: Chinese Household Income Project, 1988

Source: Griffin, Keith, and Zhao Renwei

Owner: ICPSR 9836

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Codename: CHIP88

Year: 1988

Status:  

Description: The purpose of this project was to measure and estimate the distribution of income in both rural and urban areas of the People's Republic of China. The principal investigators based their definition of income on cash payments and on a broad range of additional components: payments in kind valued at market prices, agricultural output produced for self-consumption valued at market prices, the value of ration coupons and other direct subsidies, and the imputed value of housing. The rural component of this collection consists of two data files, one in which the individual is the unit of analysis and a second in which the household is the unit of analysis. Individual rural respondents reported on their employment status, level of education, Communist Party membership, type of employer (e.g., public, private, or foreign), type of economic sector in which employed, occupation, whether they held a second job, retirement status, monthly pension, monthly wage, and other sources of income. Demographic variables include relationship to householder, gender, age, and student status. Rural households reported extensively on the character of the household and residence. Information was elicited on type of terrain surrounding the house, geographic position, type of house, and availability of electricity. Also reported were sources of household income (e.g., farming, industry, government, rents, and interest), taxes paid, value of farm, total amount and type of cultivated land, financial assets and debts, quantity and value of various crops (e.g., grains, cotton, flax, sugar, tobacco, fruits and vegetables, tea, seeds, nuts, lumber, livestock and poultry, eggs, fish and shrimp, wool, honey, and silkworm cocoons), amount of grain purchased or provided by a collective, use of chemical fertilizers, gasoline, and oil, quantity and value of agricultural machinery, and all household expenditures (e.g., food, fuel, medicine, education, transportation, and electricity). The urban component of this collection also consists of two data files, one in which the individual is the unit of analysis and a second in which the household is the unit of analysis. Individual urban respondents reported on their economic status within the household, Communist Party membership, sex, age, nature of employment, and relationship to the household head. Information was collected on all types and sources of income from each member of the household whether working, nonworking, or retired, all revenue received by owners of private or individual enterprises, and all in-kind payments (e.g., food and durable and nondurable goods). Urban households reported total income (including salaries, interest on savings and bonds, dividends, rent, leases, alimony, gifts, and boarding fees), all types and values of food rations received, and total debt. Information was also gathered on household accommodations and living conditions, including number of rooms, total living area in square meters, availability and cost of running water, sanitary facilities, heating and air-conditioning equipment, kitchen availability, location of residence, ownership of home, and availability of electricity and telephone. Households reported on all of their expenditures including amounts spent on food items such as wheat, rice, edible oils, pork, beef and mutton, poultry, fish and seafood, sugar, and vegetables by means of both coupons in state-owned stores and at free market prices. Information was also collected on rents paid by the households, fuel available, type of transportation used, and availability and use of medical and child care.

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Title: Chinese Household Income Project, 1988

Source: Griffin, Keith and Zhao Renwei.

Owner: ICPSR 9836

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Codename: CHIP88

Year: 1999

Status:  A

Description: The purpose of this project was to measure and estimate the distribution of income in both rural and urban areas of the People's Republic of China. The principal investigators based their definition of income on cash payments and on a broad range of additional components: payments in kind valued at market prices, agricultural output produced for self-consumption valued at market prices, the value of ration coupons and other direct subsidies, and the imputed value of housing. The rural component of this collection consists of two data files, one in which the individual is the unit of analysis and a second in which the household is the unit of analysis. Individual rural respondents reported on their employment status, level of education, Communist Party membership, type of employer (e.g., public, private, or foreign), type of economic sector in which employed, occupation, whether they held a second job, retirement status, monthly pension, monthly wage, and other sources of income. Demographic variables include relationship to householder, gender, age, and student status. Rural households reported extensively on the character of the household and residence. Information was elicited on type of terrain surrounding the house, geographic position, type of house, and availability of electricity. Also reported were sources of household income (e.g., farming, industry, government, rents, and interest), taxes paid, value of farm, total amount and type of cultivated land, financial assets and debts, quantity and value of various crops (e.g., grains, cotton, flax, sugar, tobacco, fruits and vegetables, tea, seeds, nuts, lumber, livestock and poultry, eggs, fish and shrimp, wool, honey, and silkworm cocoons), amount of grain purchased or provided by a collective, use of chemical fertilizers, gasoline, and oil, quantity and value of agricultural machinery, and all household expenditures (e.g., food, fuel, medicine, education, transportation, and electricity). The urban component of this collection also consists of two data files, one in which the individual is the unit of analysis and a second in which the household is the unit of analysis. Individual urban respondents reported on their economic status within the household, Communist Party membership, sex, age, nature of employment, and relationship to the household head. Information was collected on all types and sources of income from each member of the household whether working, nonworking, or retired, all revenue received by owners of private or individual enterprises, and all in-kind payments (e.g., food and durable and nondurable goods). Urban households reported total income (including salaries, interest on savings and bonds, dividends, rent, leases, alimony, gifts, and boarding fees), all types and values of food rations received, and total debt. Information was also gathered on household accommodations and living conditions, including number of rooms, total living area in square meters, availability and cost of running water, sanitary facilities, heating and air-conditioning equipment, kitchen availability, location of residence, ownership of home, and availability of electricity and telephone. Households reported on all of their expenditures including amounts spent on food items such as wheat, rice, edible oils, pork, beef and mutton, poultry, fish and seafood, sugar, and vegetables by means of both coupons in state-owned stores and at free market prices. Information was also collected on rents paid by the households, fuel available, type of transportation used, and availability and use of medical and child care.

Media: CSSCR_CD0002

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Title: Chinese Household Income Project, 1995

Source: Riskin, Carl, Zhao Renwei, and Li Shi.

Owner: ICPSR 3012

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CHIP95

Year: 1995

Status:  

Description: The purpose of this project was to measure and estimate the distribution of personal income in both rural and urban areas of the People's Republic of China. The principal investigators based their definition of income on cash payments and on a broad range of additional components: payments in kind valued at market prices, agricultural output produced for self-consumption valued at market prices, the value of food and other direct subsidies, and the imputed value of housing services. The rural component of this collection consists of two data files, one in which the individual is the unit of analysis (Part 1) and a second in which the household is the unit of analysis (Part 2). Individual rural respondents reported on their employment status, level of education, Communist Party membership, type of employer (e.g., public, private, or foreign), type of economic sector in which they were employed, occupation, whether they held a second job, retirement status, monthly pension, monthly wage, and other sources of income. Demographic variables include relationship to householder, gender, age, and student status. Rural households reported extensively on the character of the household and residence. Information was elicited on type of terrain surrounding the house, geographic position, type of house, and availability of electricity. Also reported were sources of household income (e.g., farming, industry, government, rents, and interest), taxes paid, value of farm, total amount and type of cultivated land, financial assets and debts, quantity and value of various crops, amount of grain purchased or provided by a collective, use of chemical fertilizers, gasoline, and oil, quantity and value of agricultural machinery, and all household expenditures (e.g., food, fuel, medicine, education, transportation, and electricity). The urban component of this collection also consists of two data files, one in which the individual is the unit of analysis (Part 3) and a second in which the household is the unit of analysis (Part 4). Individual urban respondents reported on their economic status within the household, Communist Party membership, sex, age, nature of employment, and relationship to the household head. Information was collected on all types and sources of income from each member of the household whether working, nonworking, or retired, all revenue received by owners of private or individual enterprises, and all in-kind payments (e.g., food, durable goods, and nondurable goods). Urban households reported total income (including salaries, interest on savings and bonds, dividends, rent, leases, alimony, gifts, and boarding fees), all types and values of food subsidies received, and total debt. Information was also gathered on household accommodations and living conditions, including number of rooms, total living area in square meters, availability and cost of running water, sanitary facilities, heating and air-conditioning equipment, kitchen availability, location of residence, ownership of home, and availability of electricity and telephone. Households reported on all their expenditures including amounts spent on food items such as wheat, rice, edible oils, pork, beef and mutton, poultry, fish and seafood, sugar, and vegetables by means of coupons in state-owned stores and at free market prices. Information was also collected on rents paid by the households, fuel available, type of transportation used, and availability and use of medical and child care.

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Title: Chinese Household Income Project, 2002

Source: Li Shi

Owner: ICPSR 21741

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Codename: CHIP02

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired. The main primary investigator, Li Shi, may be reached at the following e-mail address: <lishi89@263.net>. Please note that a fee may be requested by the investigators for additional information.

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Title: Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), 1998-2000

Source: Yi, Zeng, Vaupel, James W., Zhenyu, Xiao, Yuzhi, Liu and Chunyuan, Zhang,

Owner: ICPSR 3891

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Codename: CLHLS98-00

Year: 1998-2000

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on health status and quality of life of the elderly aged 65 and older in 22 provinces of China in the period 1998 to 2000. The study was conducted to shed light on the determinants of healthy human longevity and oldest-old mortality. To this end, data were collected on a larger percentage of the oldest population, including centenarian and nonagenarian, than had previously been studied. The CLHLS provides information on the health, socioeconomic characteristics, family, lifestyle, and demographic profile of this aged population. Data are provided on respondents' health conditions, daily functioning, self-perceptions of health status and quality of life, life satisfaction, mental attitude, and feelings about aging. Respondents were asked about their diet and nutrition, use of medical services, and drinking and smoking habits, including how long ago they quit either or both. They were also asked about their physical activities, reading habits, television viewing, and religious activities, and were tested for motor skills, memory, and visual functioning. In order to ascertain their current state of health, respondents were asked if they suffered from such health conditions as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, emphysema, asthma, tuberculosis, cataracts, glaucoma, gastric or duodenal ulcer, arthritis, Parkinson's disease, bedsores, or other chronic diseases. They were also asked if they needed assistance with bathing, dressing, toileting, or feeding, and who provided help in times of illness. Other questions focused on siblings, parents, and children, the frequency of family visits, and the distance lived from each other. Demographic items specify age, sex, ethnicity, place of birth, marital history and status, history of childbirth, living arrangements, education, main occupation before age 60, and sources of financial support. Users are advised that the data in the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), 1998-2000 (ICPSR 3891) collection are restricted and available only by special arrangement with the staff in the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at ICPSR. Users interested in obtaining the 1998 and 2000 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey micro datasets need to download the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey data use agreement form from the ICPSR Web site:http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/NACDA/Pledge/03891.pdf. DATE ADDED: 02-27-2004.

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Title: Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), 1998-2002

Source: Zeng Yi, Duke University and Peking University; James W. Vaupel, Max Planck Institute and Duke University

Owner: ICPSR 3891

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CLHLS98-02

Year: 1998-2002

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides information on health status and quality of life of the elderly aged 65 and older in 22 provinces of China in the period 1998 to 2002. The study was conducted to shed light on the determinants of healthy human longevity and oldest-old mortality. To this end, data were collected on a larger percentage of the oldest population, including centenarian and nonagenarian, than had previously been studied. The CLHLS provides information on the health, socioeconomic characteristics, family, lifestyle, and demographic profile of this aged population. Data are provided on respondents' health conditions, daily functioning, self-perceptions of health status and quality of life, life satisfaction, mental attitude, and feelings about aging. Respondents were asked about their diet and nutrition, use of medical services, and drinking and smoking habits, including how long ago they quit either or both. They were also asked about their physical activities, reading habits, television viewing, and religious activities, and were tested for motor skills, memory, and visual functioning. In order to ascertain their current state of health, respondents were asked if they suffered from such health conditions as hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, emphysema, asthma, tuberculosis, cataracts, glaucoma, gastric or duodenal ulcer, arthritis, Parkinson's disease, bedsores, or other chronic diseases. They were also asked if they needed assistance with bathing, dressing, toileting, or feeding, and who provided help in times of illness. Other questions focused on siblings, parents, and children, the frequency of family visits, and the distance lived from each other. Demographic items specify age, sex, ethnicity, place of birth, marital history and status, history of childbirth, living arrangements, education, main occupation before age 60, and sources of financial support. Users interested in obtaining a CD-ROM containing the 1998, 2000, and 2002 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey micro datasets need to download the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey restricted data use agreement form.

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Title: Churches and Church Membership, U.S., 1980

Source: National Council Of Churches

Owner: The Roper Center

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: CHCHP

Year: 1980

Status:  A

Description: The 1980 church membership dataset has one record per county in the United States. For each of 111 denominations, there are four variables 1) denomination code, 2) number of churches, 3) number of communicants, and 4) number of adherents. There are a total of 3101 records with a logical record length of 2695 characters. The CSSCR staff has created an SMSA level file for this data. This new file contains 305 cases which include SMSA's (excluding those in New England) and Necma's. The record length is the same as the county level data but the format of the variables has been changed.

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Title: Citizen Attitude Survey: Urban Problems in Ten American Cities, 1970

Source: National League Of Cities, Urban Observatory Program

Owner: ICPSR 7340

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Codename: CASUPTAC70

Year: 1970

Status:  A

Description: Citizen attitudes toward local government services and opinions about local problems in the areas of schooling, housing, public transportation, drugs, law and order, and taxes were asked in ten cities. Socio-economic status and household composition are included. Each of the cities (Atlanta, Albuquerque, Baltimore, Boston, Denver, Kansas City, both Kansas and Missouri, Nashville, and San Diego) can be analyzed separately or may be treated as integral part of the comparative study. N=4266, >288 vars, class II.

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Title: Citizen Disenchantment in Mexico (national survey, June 2006)

Source: Crow, David, Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas (CIDE); Luskin, Robert, University of Texas at Austin

Owner: ICPSR 34669

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Codename: CDiM

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: Citizen Disenchantment in Mexico is a national survey (N=650) carried out in June, 2006, and funded by National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant Award #0519262 (PI's David Crow and Robert Luskin). The survey's 96 questions gauge citizen definitions of democracy (including a 12-item battery on electoral, liberal, and substantive conceptualizations of democracy) and evaluations of Mexican democracy. It also includes a 15-item battery on migration experiences. The survey is organized into eight sections: (1) Political Participation and Preferences; (2) Political Interest; (3) Migration and Remittances; (4) General Concepts about Democracy; (5) Evaluation of Democracy in Mexico; (6) Support for Democracy; (7) Political Knowledge; and (8) Sociodemographic Data.

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Title: Citizenship, Democracy, and Drug-Related Violence (CIDENA, 2011)

Source: Collective for Security Analysis with Democracy A.C.; Universidad Panamericana (Mexico). IPADE Business School. Center for the Study of Institutional Governance;

Owner: ICPSR 34670

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Codename: CIDENA11

Year: 2011

Status: A

Description: The survey Citizenship, Democracy, and Drug-Related Violence (CIDENA, 2011) was implemented with the goal of providing information towards understanding the complex relationship between society and drug-related violence in Mexico. Cognitive interviews, face-to-face interviews, and list experiments were utilized in Mexico. The survey was conducted in face-to-face interviews (at the residence of the interviewee) based on a sample of men and women over 18 years of age and residents of Mexico. The sample was representative nationwide of 7 states with different levels of violence: High (Chihuahua, Guerrero, Michoacán, and Nuevo León), Intermediate (Jalisco, and Estado de México), and Low (Distrito Federal). These states were selected according to their violence indexes (deaths associated with drug related violence reported in local newspapers). Demographic variables include age, sex, marital status, occupation, party affiliation, territories of residence, education, and income.

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Title: Civil Justice Survey of State Courts, 2001: [United States]

Source: United States Department of Justice. Bureau of Justice Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 3957

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Codename: CJSSC2001

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: This data collection examined general civil cases (torts, contracts, and real property) disposed of by bench or jury trial in the nation's 75 most populous counties in 2001. Information reported includes the type of case, types of plaintiffs and defendants, trial winners, amount of total damages awarded, amount of punitive damages awarded, and case processing time. This is the third in a series of data collections begun in 1992 [CIVIL JUSTICE SURVEY OF STATE COURTS, 1992: [UNITED STATES] (ICPSR 6587) and CIVIL JUSTICE SURVEY OF STATE COURTS, 1996: [UNITED STATES] (ICPSR 2883)]. DATE ADDED: 06-02-2004.

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Title: Civil Litigation in the United States, 1977-1979

Source: Kritzer, Herbert, David Trubek, William Felstiner, Joel Grossman

Owner: ICPSR 7994

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Codename: CLUS

Year:  

Status: A

Description: The Civil Litigation Research Project, based at the University of Wisconsin Law School, was organizaed in 1979. The major goals of the project were the developent of a large database on dispute processing and litigation and the collection of information on the costs of civil litigation. Data were gathered on such topics as negotiations proceedings, relationship between the lawyer and the client, and organizations' influence on the outcome of a dispute. Class IV

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Title: Civil Union Study 2000-2002, United States

Source: Rothblum, Esther, San Diego State University; Balsam, Kimberly, University of Washington

Owner: ICPSR 31241

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Codename: CUS02

Year: 2000-2002

Status: A

Description: This is a public use data. Vermont was the first state in the United States to legalize same-sex relationships in mid-2000, so that same-sex couples could have the same legal rights as heterosexual married couples at the state level. Same-sex couples came to Vermont from all over the country to legalize their relationships. During the first year that this legislation was enacted, 80 percent of civil unions were acquired by out-of-state residents. In 2002, a project was conducted that compared couples who had civil unions in Vermont during the first year of that new legislation (July 2000-June 2001) with same-sex couples in their friendship circles who had not had civil unions, and with heterosexual married siblings (Solomon, Rothblum, and Balsam, 2004; 2005). The focus was on demographic factors, length of relationship, social support from family and friends, contact with families of origin, social and political activities, degree of "outness," and division of housework, child care, and finances. This was the first study to focus on same-sex couples in legalized relationships in the United States. It was also the first study to examine same-sex couples recruited from a population instead of a convenience sample, because civil unions are a matter of public record. Results indicated very few differences between same-sex couples in civil unions and those not in civil unions, particularly for women. Women in civil unions were more "out" about their sexual orientation, and more likely to consider themselves married than were women not in civil unions. Men in civil unions were more likely to have children, joint bank accounts with their partner, mutual friends with their partner, more connection with their family of origin, and to consider themselves married. They were less likely to have seriously discussed ending their relationship than men not in civil unions (Solomon et al., 2004). In contrast, both types of same-sex couples differed from heterosexual married couples in numerous ways. Same-sex couples were in their current relationship for a shorter duration, less religious, less likely to have children, more likely to share housework and finances, and less close to their family of origin than heterosexual couples. Women in same-sex relationships were more highly educated and perceived less social support from their family of origin than heterosexual married women. Men in same-sex relationships lived in larger cities, were less monogamous and more likely to agree that non-monogamy was acceptable, and perceived more social support from their friends than heterosexual married men. It is not surprising that same-sex couples differed from heterosexual couples. Prior research on lesbians and gay men from convenience samples that compared them to (a) United States census data (e.g., Bradford and Ryan, 1988), (b) their heterosexual siblings (e.g., Rothblum, et al., 2004; Rothblum and Factor, 2001), and (c) representative national samples (e.g., Laumann, Gagnon, Michael and Michaels, 1994) have consistently indicated demographic differences. It was also not surprising that same-sex couples in civil unions were quite similar to same-sex couples not in civil unions given that the first study was conducted after the first year of the new legislation. Consequently, that study was more about who chooses to have a civil union versus those who do not. It was less about how being in a civil union changes a relationship -- for that, follow-up research is needed. Demographic variables include age, race, education, religion, sexual orientation, income, and occupation.

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Title: Class Structure and Class Consciousness Study, 1980

Source: Erik Olin Wright

Owner: David Hachen, Department of Sociology, U

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: CSCCUS

Year: 1980

Status:  A

Description: Data collected in this survey measure how social concepts such as authority, autonomy, and hierarchy related to the social, economic, and occupational positions of individuals, thus providing a systematic means for analyzing social class structure. The survey is part of an eight-nation comparative project; most of the questions asked in the United States survey will be replicated in other countries. A systematic cluster sample of telephone numbers was used to gather data from 1,760 persons. The universe consisted of adults age 18 and over in the continental United States who either were working, were not working but wanted to work, or were housewives with working spouses. A battery of questions addressed work-related issues such as supervision, decision-making, autonomy, respondent's formal position in hierarchy, ownership, credentials, and income. Other work-related data describe the size of industrial sector, and government or corporate linkages of the individual's emplorer.

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Title: Class Structure and Class Consciousness: Merged Multi-Nation File

Source: Wright, Erik O. et al.

Owner: ICPSR 8413

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CSCCMG

Year: 1980

Status: A

Description: Data collected in these surveys measure how such social concepts as authority, autonomy, and hierarchy relate to the social, economic, and occupational positions of individuals, thus providing a systematic means for analyzing social class structure. A battery of questions addressed work- related issues such as supervision, decision making, autonomy, respondent's formal position in the hierarchy, ownership ,credentials, and income. Other work related data describe the size, industrial sector,, and government or corporate linkages of the individual's employer. Further information was gathered on the class origins of the respondent's family and of the families of the respondent's spouse and friends. Data on class related experiences such as unemployment and union participation were also collected, as well as data on the division of power and labor in the household. In addition, the survey contained a broad range of questions on the social abd political attitudes and on the respondent's political participation. Class II.

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Title: Collaborative Research on a Micro Analysis of Union Wage Settlements in Manufact

Source: The Urban Institute

Owner: ICPSR 8716

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Codename: MAUWS

Year:  

Status: A

Description: This data collection provides data on the main provisions of a sample of collective bargaining agreements reached between 1957 and 1979. Information includes date and duration of contracts, cost of living adjustments, and profit sharing provisions. Economic indicators at the time of bargaining are also provided. Class IV.

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Title: Comparative Research on the Events of Nations (CREON) Project: Foreign Policy Events, 1959-1968

Source: Hermann, Charles, et al.

Owner: ICPSR 5205

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Codename: CREON

Year: 1959-1968

Status: A

Description: This study provides data for 36 nations on the behaviors engaged in by international actors and the internal governmental processes associated with these behaviors in the period 1959-1968. Data are available for actors, actions, resources, targets, and behavior. Variables that identify actors include heads of state, ad hoc small groups, formal small groups, multinational collaborators, deliberative assemblies, treasuries, and nongovernmental decision-makers, as well as foreign affairs, economic, intelligence, and internal affairs bureaucracies, and other units. Actions variables are divided into verbal and nonverbal actions and both are further divided into conflictual and cooperative actions. Variables on resources provide information on the nature of the skills the actor used in executing an event, and they include economic, scientific, and technical resources, as well as military, diplomatic, political, legal, cultural, and ideological resources. Information is also provided on the proposed use, actual use, and future time use of these resources. Target variables specify direct and indirect objects, number, and the nature of the objects or targets. Behavior variables are divided into verbal and nonverbal behaviors and include those for unilateral policy exchange, border, protocol, penetrative, military, comment, bargaining, world organization, regional organization, treaty, propaganda and culture, foreign assistance, and economic transaction behaviors. Each record is an event. The data were coded for randomly selected quarter-years of the ten-year period.

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Title: Comparative Study of Community Decision-Making

Source: Clark, Terry N.

Owner: ICPSR 0025

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Codename: CSCDM

Year: 1984

Status: A

Description: Data on the community decision-making process in 51 American cities. Information regarding general political and public policy issues, as well as on specific municipal problems and their solution was obtained from interviews with eight prominent individuals in each city. The elite interviews were conducted with the Chamber of Commerce president, a labor leader, a newspaper editor, the chairmen of the Democratic and Republican parties, the president of the largest bank, and the mayor. Data are also available on the characteristics of the cities, including composite indexes created from the interview data as well as data from sources including reports of the Census Bureau, Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Municipal Yearbook, as well as scholarly publications. The data can be supplied either as separate files of individual and aggregate-level data, or with the data on the characteristics of each city merged with the relevant individual-level records. The data were collected by the National Opinion Research Center. There are approximately 13,000 card-image equivalents.

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Title: Comparative Study of Electoral Systems, 2001-2006

Source: Virginia Sapiro, Comparative Study of Electoral Systems

Owner: ICPSR 3808

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Codename: cses01-06

Year: 2001-2006

Status: A

Description: This study is the full release of 2001-2006 data from Module 2 of the Comparative Study of Electoral Systems. The Comparative Study of Electoral Systems is an ongoing collaborative program of crossnational research among national election studies designed to advance the understanding of electoral behavior across polities. The project, which is being carried out in over 50 consolidated and emerging democracies, was coordinated by social scientists from around the world who cooperated to specify the research agenda, the study design, and the micro- and macro-level data that native teams of researchers collected within each polity. This collection currently comprises data from surveys conducted in the countries of Albania, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, and the United States. Module 2 focuses on electoral institutions and political behavior, particularly on the fundamental principles of democratic governance: representation and accountability. It aims to examine how well different electoral institutions function as mechanisms by which citizens' views are represented in the policymaking process, and by which citizens hold their elected representatives accountable. This is accomplished by explicitly linking individual attitudes and behaviors to the political context across a variety of settings. The module added a new set of items on citizen engagement and cognition across demographic polities, and expanded the analyses of the first module to examine how voters' choices are affected by the institutional context within which those choices are made. The survey results have been compiled and supplemented with district-level information that provides insight into the respondent's political context, and macro-level data that detail the respondent's political system as a whole. At each level of data collection, the measurements used have been standardized to promote comparison. Demographic variables include age, sex, race, ethnicity, education level, marital status, employment status, occupation, household union membership, language, socioeconomic status, political party affiliation, political orientation, religious preference, frequency of religious attendance, household income, number of children and other members of the household, and type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural).

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Title: Comparative Survey of Freedom, 1972-1976

Source: Gastil, Raymond D

Owner: ICPSR 7555

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Codename: CSOF7276

Year: 1972-1976

Status: A

Description: This data collection contains information gathered in five annual surveys that assessed the degree of freedom in 218 nations and dependencies from 1972-1976. The study was carried out under the auspices of Freedom House, New York City. The number of cases with data varies from year to year, due to annexation, amalgamation, or the addition of further territories to the roster. The data include assessments of the political and civil rights of the general population (using a seven-point scale, i.e., 1, most freedom, to 7, least freedom), an overall freedom rating for the country (using a three-point scale, i.e, free, partly free, and not free), and the direction in which this rating appeared to be moving. Surveys after 1972 have added variables that indicate whether a change in the evaluation since the previous survey was due to internal events in the country or to new information about existing conditions. Before 1973, only the presence or absence of change is noted. Thereafter, an increase in the number of coding categories enables the direction of the change to be recorded. The 1976 data include four additional variables applicable to 142 cases and provide information about the system of government and the economy of most of the nations studied. The rationale used in assigning the seven categories on the continuum of most to least freedom can be found in Appendix III of the codebook, including which civil and political rights were considered critical in order for a nation to garner each rating. DATE ADDED: 02-18-2004.

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Title: Comparison of Older Volunteers and Older Nonvolunteers in the Philadelphia Area, 1993-1998

Source: Norah Shultz, Arcadia University

Owner: ICPSR 20460

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Codename: Volunteer93-98

Year: 1993-1998

Status: A

Description: This research was undertaken to uncover the predictors of volunteerism for older persons and to determine the mental health benefits of such activity. The study was conducted from August 1993 until July 1998 in the greater Philadelphia area. A sample of White and African American males and females aged 65 and older were chosen for the study. For the study, four types of volunteer activity were developed. The first two types were "continuous volunteers," those who volunteer throughout the life course, and "continuous nonvolunteers," those who never volunteered. The third type, the "new volunteer," is a person who never volunteered earlier in life but has begun volunteering in later years, most probably as a substitute for lost work or family roles. The last type is the "lost volunteer," the person who once participated in volunteer activities but now has withdrawn from the role. Structural factors included age and income. Cultural factors included perceived importance and past volunteer activity. Perceived importance included level of agreement to a series of five statements such as, "People with unused skills and talents should make use of them by doing volunteer work," and "Volunteer work is essential to meet the communitys' needs." These items were developed specifically for use by persons aged 65 and older. In order to determine past volunteer behavior, a composite measure was created which included any prior volunteer behavior mentioned by both the current volunteers and those currently not volunteering, as well as including any volunteer work of the current volunteers that was a continuation of prior work.

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Title: Compassion Capital Fund Demonstration Program Impact Study, FY 2006-2008, United States

Source: Campbell, Nancye, United States Department of Health and Human Services. Administration for Children and Families. Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

Owner: ICPSR 29481

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Codename: CCFD0608

Year: 2006-2008

Status: A

Description: The Compassion Capital Fund (CCF) program conducted a study of the financial and technical assistance (TA) provided by intermediary organizations and the effects of those services in improving the organizational capacity of the faith-based and community organizations (FBCOs) they assist. The goal of the study was to assess whether the CCF program was meeting its primary objective of improving the organizational capacity of FBCOs. The study sample was the entire population of nonprofit organizations (NPOs) that applied for assistance and were determined eligible by the ten intermediary organizations awarded CCF Demonstration Program grants in the 2006 grant cycle. In total, 455 organizations completed the baseline survey and 385 completed a version of the follow-up survey. Survey questions were categorized into topics including organization profile, financial management practices, funding sources, human resource practices, organizational governance, technological equipment, and level of community engagement. Questions included the purpose for which the organization was applying for assistance, whether the organization was religious or faith based, the organizations primary service areas, how the organization measures effectiveness, total expenditures for the year, whether the organization previously applied for funding, sources of revenue, and whether the organization participated in grant writing workshops. Other questions included a head count of paid and volunteer staff, the number of organizational leaders, the level of involvement of organizational leaders in staff development, the level of staff participation in training and development opportunities, the activities of the Board of Directors, whether or not there was sufficient technological equipment to meet organizational needs, and how the organization has reached out to the community.

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Title: Competitiveness, Technology and Firm Linkages in Manufacturing Sectors, 1998 - 2000

Source: The World Bank, Shahid Yusuf, Kaoru Nabeshima, and Yifan Hu

Owner: Davidson Data Center and Network (DDCN)

ICPSR Info: Not an ICPSR Data Set

Codename: CTFLMS1998-2000

Year: 1998-2000

Status: A

Description: The dataset is created from a firm-level survey conducted by the World Bank in 2001 to be used as a background material for 'Innovative East Asia: The Future of Growth'. The survey covers 1,500 Chinese firms, which are evenly distributed across five big cities: Beijing, Chengdu, Guangzhou, Shanghai and Tianjing. The sample firms are drawn within ten sectors, of which five are manufacturing sectors including apparel and leather goods, consumer goods, electronic components, electronic equipment and vehicles and vehicle parts and the other five are service sectors including accounting and related services, advertising and marketing, business logistics, communication services and information technology services. The chosen five manufacturing sectors reflect China's current or potential competitive strengths. The survey is based on a two-part questionnaire. The first part is to be completed by accountants to acquire the firm's basic profile such as the ownership, revenues, costs and labor force. The second part is designed for face-to-face interview with senior managers to obtain the firm's information on competition, innovation and external relationships with clients, supplies, government and research institutions. Most accounting data cover 3-year period of 1998-2000, while most interview data are only for the year of 2000. Variables: Information about innovations, market environment, relations with clients, relations with suppliers, location of manufacturing plant, relations with government, international trade, ownership and revenue, costs of production, labor force statistics and training programs. Article/Working Paper: Yusuf, Shahid, M. Anjum Altaf, Barry Eichengreen, Sudarshan Gooptu, Kaoru Nabeshima, Charles Kenny, Dwight H. Perkins, and Marc Shotten. ''Innovative East Asia'', Oxford Univsersity Press, New York 2003. Jefferson, Gary H. and Zhong Kaifeng. ''R&D and Innovation Capabilities in East Asia''. Working Paper. Washington DC: World Bank 2002. Steinfeld, Edward. ''Chinese Enterprise Development and the Challenge of Global Integration.'' MIT IPC Working Paper 02-004. Industrial Performance Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge 2002. Yusuf, Shahid, Yifan Hu, and Kaoru Nabeshima, ''Productivity and Innovation in Chinese Firms, 1998-2000'', Working Paper, Washington, DC: World Bank. Funding Agency: The World Bank Data Location: The William Davidson Institute Data Access: Downloadable from DDCN Date Added to CSSCR Archive: 10/12/2004

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Ncases: 1,500


Title: Conflict Management by International Organizations, 1945 - 1970

Source: Ernst Haas, Robert Butterworth, adn Joseph Nye

Owner: ICPSR 5303

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Codename: CFMIO

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: This dataset contains 254 variables for 132 disputes in which the authors found evidence of some involvement by the United Nations, the Organization of American States, the Organization of African Unity, the Arab League, or the Council of Europe. Variables measure aspects of the dispute including the world political conditions, intensity, spread, system era, power of parties, issues, and organizational response of the alignment which includes the leadership, consensus, forum and operations, and the degree of success or failure of the organization. Class II

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Title: Connecticut Health Care Survey, 2012-2013

Source: University of Massachusetts Medical School. Office of Survey Research

Owner: ICPSR 35475

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Codename: CHCS13

Year: 2012-2013

Status: A

Description: The Connecticut Health Care Survey was a statewide, random-digit dial telephone survey conducted from June 2012 to February 2013. The goal of the survey was to gather health-related experiences, information, and perspectives from Connecticut residents about themselves and children within their households. The survey provides state-level data on the health and health care of Connecticut residents, including health insurance coverage, access and sources of care, continuity of care, health status, and patient-provider experience and communication. Demographic variables include gender, age, race/ethnicity, and health reference group.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 1960-1961

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 9035

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Codename: CES60-61

Year: 1960-1961

Status: A

Description: This data collection includes detailed information on the purchasing habits of Americans in 1960-1961, with over 200 types of expenditures coded. For the first time since 1941, the Consumer Expenditure Survey sampled both urban, non-farm and rural, farm households in an attempt to provide a complete picture of consumer expenditures in the United States. Personal interviews were conducted in 1960 and 1961 (and a small number in 1959) with 9,476 urban families, 2,285 rural non-farm families, and 1,967 rural farm families, for a total of 13,728 consumer units interviewed. A complete account of family income and outlays was compiled for a calendar year, as well as household characteristics. The expenditures covered by the survey were those which respondents could recall fairly accurately for three months or longer. In general, these expenditures included relatively large purchases, such as those for property, automobiles, and major appliances, or expenditures that occurred on a fairly regular basis, such as rent, utilities, or insurance premiums. Expenditures incurred while on trips were also covered by the survey. Information to determine net changes in the family's assets and liabilities during the year was also gathered. The estimated value of goods and services received, as gifts or otherwise, without direct expenditures by the family, was requested also. In addition, farm families provided farm receipts, disbursements, changes in farm assets, and value of home-produced food. To supplement the annual data, non-farm families who prepared meals at home provided a detailed seven-day record, during the week prior to the interview, of expenditures for food and related items purchased frequently (e.g., tobacco, personal care, and household supplies). For selected items of clothing, house furnishings, and food, the record of expenditures was supplemented by information on quantities purchased and prices paid. Characteristics of the housing occupied by homeowners and renters and an inventory of the major items of house furnishing they owned also were recorded. Demographic information includes sex, age, years of school completed, occupation, race, and marital status of each family member.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 1997: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Owner: ICPSR 2838

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Codename: CES97ISDEF

Year: 1997

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. The expenditures covered by the survey are those that respondents can recall fairly accurately for three months or longer. In general, these expenditures include relatively large purchases, such as those for property, or expenditures that occur on a fairly regular basis, such as rent, utilities, or insurance premiums. Excluded are nonprescription drugs, household supplies, and personal care items. Including global estimates on spending for food, it is estimated that about 90 to 95 percent of expenditures are covered in the Interview Survey. The Detailed Expenditure Files were created from all the major expenditure sections of the Interview Survey questionnaires and contain the most detailed expenditure data from the Interview Survey. Parts 69-72 contain processing files used by the program in Part 73. Part 73, Documentation File, includes a sample program and lists of the data file variables by start position. Parts 75 and 76 are SAS programs that generate means, variances, standard errors, and coefficients of variation. DATE ADDED: 07-03-2003.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2000: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 3396

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Codename: CES00ISDEF

Year: 2000

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. The expenditures covered by the survey are those that respondents can recall fairly accurately for three months or longer. In general, these expenditures include relatively large purchases, such as those for property, or expenditures that occur on a fairly regular basis, such as rent, utilities, or insurance premiums. Excluded are nonprescription drugs, household supplies, and personal care items. Including global estimates on spending for food, it is estimated that about 90 to 95 percent of expenditures are covered in the Interview Survey. The Detailed Expenditure Files were created from all the major expenditure sections of the Interview Survey questionnaires and contain the most detailed expenditure data from the Interview Survey. Parts 69-72 contain processing files used by the program in Part 73. Part 73, Documentation File, includes a sample program and lists all of the data file variables by start position. Part 74 is a SAS program that generates means, variances, standard errors, and coefficients of variation.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2001: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 3674

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Codename: CES01ISDEF

Year: 2001

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. The expenditures covered by the survey are those that respondents can recall fairly accurately for three months or longer. In general, these expenditures include relatively large purchases, such as those for property, or expenditures that occur on a fairly regular basis, such as rent, utilities, or insurance premiums. Excluded are nonprescription drugs, household supplies, and personal care items. Including global estimates on spending for food, it is estimated that about 90 to 95 percent of expenditures are covered in the Interview Survey. The Detailed Expenditure Files were created from all the major expenditure sections of the Interview Survey questionnaires and contain the most detailed expenditure data from the Interview Survey. Parts 74-77 contain processing files used by the program in Part 78. Part 78, Documentation File, includes a sample program and lists all of the data file variables by start position. Part 79 is a SAS program that generates means, variances, standard errors, and coefficients of variation.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2002: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 3937

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Codename: CES02D

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a fifteen-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Diary Survey contains consumer information on small, frequently-purchased items such as food, beverages, food consumed away from home, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription drugs and medical supplies, and personal care products and services. Participants are asked to maintain expense records, or diaries, of all purchases made each day for two consecutive one-week periods. The Consumer Unit Characteristics and Income (FMLY) files supply information on consumer unit characteristics, consumer unit income, and characteristics and earnings of the reference person and his or her spouse. A consumer unit (CU) consists of all members of a particular housing unit who are related by blood, marriage, adoption, or some other legal arrangement. Consumer unit determination for unrelated persons is based on financial independence. Member Characteristics (MEMB) files contain selected characteristics and earnings for each consumer unit member, including information on relationship to reference person. The Detailed Expenditures (EXPN) files present weekly data on expenditures at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level, while Income (DTAB) files contain data on CU characteristics and income at the UCC level.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2002: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 3949

ICPSR Info: Get ICPSR Documentation

Codename: CES02ISDEF

Year: 2002

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. The expenditures covered by the survey are those that respondents can recall fairly accurately for three months or longer. In general, these expenditures include relatively large purchases, such as those for property, or expenditures that occur on a fairly regular basis, such as rent, utilities, or insurance premiums. Excluded are nonprescription drugs, household supplies, and personal care items. Including global estimates on spending for food, it is estimated that about 90 to 95 percent of expenditures are covered in the Interview Survey. The Detailed Expenditure Files were created from all the major expenditure sections of the Interview Survey questionnaires and contain the most detailed expenditure data from the Interview Survey. Parts 71-75 contain processing files used by the Interview Survey Sample Program (Part 70).

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2003: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 4180

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Codename: CES03D

Year: 2003

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Diary Survey contains consumer information on small, frequently-purchased items such as food, beverages, food consumed away from home, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription drugs and medical supplies, and personal care products and services. Participants are asked to maintain expense records, or diaries, of all purchases made each day for two consecutive one-week periods. The Consumer Unit Characteristics and Income (FMLY) files supply information on consumer unit characteristics, consumer unit income, and characteristics and earnings of the reference person and his or her spouse. A consumer unit (CU) consists of all members of a particular housing unit who are related by blood, marriage, adoption, or some other legal arrangement. Consumer unit determination for unrelated persons is based on financial independence. Member Characteristics (MEMB) files contain selected characteristics and earnings for each consumer unit member, including information on relationship to reference person. The Detailed Expenditures (EXPN) files present weekly data on expenditures at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level, while Income (DTAB) files contain data on CU characteristics and income at the UCC level.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2003: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 4184

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Codename: CES03I

Year: 2003

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. The expenditures covered by the survey are those that respondents can recall fairly accurately for three months or longer. In general, these expenditures include relatively large purchases, such as those for property, or expenditures that occur on a fairly regular basis, such as rent, utilities, or insurance premiums. Excluded are nonprescription drugs, household supplies, and personal care items. Including global estimates on spending for food, it is estimated that about 90 to 95 percent of expenditures are covered in the Interview Survey. The Detailed Expenditure Files were created from all the major expenditure sections of the Interview Survey questionnaires and contain the most detailed expenditure data from the Interview Survey.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2004: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 4415

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Codename: CES04D

Year: 2004

Status: A

Description: These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2005: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 4687

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Codename: CES05D

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Diary Survey contains consumer information on small, frequently-purchased items such as food, beverages, food consumed away from home, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription drugs and medical supplies, and personal care products and services. These 2005 data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2005: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 20103

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Codename: CES05I

Year: 2005

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. These 2005 data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2006: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 22000

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Codename: CES06D

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Interview Survey was designed to collect data on major items of expense, household characteristics, and income. These 2006 data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2006: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 22001

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Codename: CES06I

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Diary Survey contains consumer information on small, frequently-purchased items such as food, beverages, food consumed away from home, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription drugs and medical supplies, and personal care products and services. These 2006 data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2007: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 25622

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Codename: CES07D

Year: 2007

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program consists of two surveys, the quarterly Interview Survey and the Diary Survey, that provide information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. The survey data are collected for the Bureau of Labor Statistics by the U.S. Census Bureau.These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired. If you have questions on how to use the data may contact with data archivist at CSSCR.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2007: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 25623

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Codename: CES07I

Year: 2007

Status: B

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Diary Survey contains consumer information on small, frequently-purchased items such as food, beverages, food consumed away from home, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription drugs and medical supplies, and personal care products and services. These 2008 data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor.ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired. If you have questions on how to use the data may contact with data archivist at CSSCR

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2008: Diary Survey

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 26724

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Codename: CES08D

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program consists of two surveys, the quarterly Interview Survey and the Diary Survey, that provide information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. The survey data are collected for the Bureau of Labor Statistics by the U.S. Census Bureau.These data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired. If you have questions on how to use the data may contact with data archivist at CSSCR.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2008: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 26725

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Codename: CES08I

Year: 2008

Status: A

Description: The ongoing Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) provides a continuous flow of information on the buying habits of American consumers and also furnishes data to support periodic revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The survey consists of two separate components: (1) a quarterly Interview Survey in which each consumer unit in the sample is interviewed every three months over a 15-month period, and (2) a Diary Survey completed by the sample consumer units for two consecutive one-week periods. The Diary Survey contains consumer information on small, frequently-purchased items such as food, beverages, food consumed away from home, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, nonprescription drugs and medical supplies, and personal care products and services. These 2008 data are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor.ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired. If you have questions on how to use the data may contact with data archivist at CSSCR

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2009: Diary Survey Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 29883

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Codename: CES09D

Year: 2009

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides a continuous and comprehensive flow of data on the buying habits of American consumers including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. These data are used widely in economic research and analysis, and in support of revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The CE program consists of two surveys, the Diary Survey and the quarterly Interview Survey (ICPSR 29884). The Diary Survey is designed to obtain data on frequently purchased smaller items, including food and beverages, both at home and in food establishments, housekeeping supplies, tobacco, nonprescription drugs, and personal care products and services. Each consumer unit (CU) records its expenditures in a diary for two consecutive 1-week periods. Although the diary was designed to collect information on expenditures that could not be easily recalled over time, respondents are asked to report all expenses (except overnight travel) that the CU incurs during the survey week. The microdata in this collection are available as SAS, STATA, SPSS data sets or ASCII text and comma-delimited files. The 2009 Diary release contains five sets of data files (FMLY, MEMB, EXPN, DTAB, DTID) and three processing files. The FMLY, MEMB, EXPN, DTAB, and DTID files are organized by the quarter of the calendar year in which the data were collected. There are four quarterly data sets for each of these files. The FMLY files contain CU characteristics, income, and summary level expenditures; the MEMB files contain member characteristics and income data; the EXPN files contain detailed weekly expenditures at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level; the DTAB files contains the CU's reported annual income values or the mean of the five imputed income values in the multiple imputation method; and the DTID files contain the five imputed income values. The summary level expenditure and income information on the FMLY files permits the data user to link consumer spending, by general expenditure category, and household characteristics and demographics on one set of files. The three processing files enhance computer processing and tabulation of data, and provide descriptive information on item codes. The three processing files are: (1) an aggregation scheme file used in the published consumer expenditure tables (DSTUB), (2) a UCC file that contains UCCs and their abbreviated titles, identifying the expenditure, income, or demographic item represented by each UCC, and (3) a sample program file that contains the computer program used in Section VII.A. SAMPLE PROGRAM of the Diary User Guide. The processing files are further explained in Section III.E.5. PROCESSING FILES of the same User Guide documentation. There is also a second user guide, "User's Guide to Income Imputation in the CE", which includes information on how to appropriately use the imputed income data. Demographic and family characteristics data include age, sex, race, marital status, and CU relationships each CU member. Income information, such as wage, salary, unemployment compensation, child support, and alimony, as well as information on the employment of each CU member age 14 and over was also collected.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2009: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 29884

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Codename: CES09I

Year: December 2009

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides a continuous and comprehensive flow of data on the buying habits of American consumers including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. These data are used widely in economic research and analysis, and in support of revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The CE program consists of two surveys, the quarterly Interview Survey and the Diary Survey (ICPSR 29883). The quarterly Interview survey is designed to collect data on major items of expense which respondents can be expected to recall for 3 months or longer. These include relatively large expenditures, such as those for property, automobiles, and major durable goods, and those that occur on a regular basis, such as rent or utilities. The Interview survey does not collect data on expenses for housekeeping supplies, personal care products, and nonprescription drugs, which contribute about 5 to 15 percent of total expenditures. The microdata in this collection are available as SAS, STATA, SPSS data sets or ASCII text and comma-delimited files. The 2009 Interview release contains seven groups of Interview data files (FMLY, MEMB, MTAB, ITAB, ITAB_IMPUTE, FPAR, and MCHI), 50 EXPN files, and processing files. The FMLY, MEMB, MTAB, ITAB, and ITAB_IMPUTE files are organized by the calendar quarter of the year in which the data were collected. There are five quarterly data sets for each of these files, running from the first quarter of 2009 through the first quarter of 2010. The FMLY file contains consumer unit (CU) characteristics, income, and summary level expenditures; the MEMB file contains member characteristics and income data; the MTAB file contains expenditures organized on a monthly basis at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level; the ITAB file contains income data converted to a monthly time frame and assigned to UCCs; and the ITAB_IMPUTE file contains the five imputation variants of the income data converted to a monthly time frame and assigned to UCCs. The FPAR and MCHI datasets are grouped as 2-year datasets (2008 and 2009), plus the first quarter of the 2010. The FPAR file contains CU level data about the Interview survey, including paradata collected about the interview within the interview collection instrument (CAPI). This data includes information on the amount of time required to collect each interview and interview section, as well as other interviewer entered information about the resulting survey. The MCHI file contains data about each interview contact attempt, including reasons for refusal and times of contact. Both FPAR and MCHI files contain five quarters of data. Each of the 50 EXPN files contains five quarters of data. The EXPN files contain data directly derived from their respective questionnaire sections. The processing files enhance computer processing and tabulation of data, and provide descriptive information on item codes. The processing files are: (1) aggregation scheme files used in the published consumer expenditure survey interview tables and integrated tables (ISTUB and INTSTUB), (2) a UCC file that contains UCCs and their abbreviated titles, identifying the expenditure, income, or demographic item represented by each UCC, (3) a vehicle make file (CAPIVEHI), and (4) files containing sample programs. The processing files are further explained in the Interview User Guide, Section III.F.6. PROCESSING FILES. There is also a second user guide, "User's Guide to Income Imputation in the CE", which includes information on how to appropriately use the imputed income data. Demographic and family characteristics data include age, sex, race, marital status, and CU relationships each CU member. Income information, such as wage, salary, unemployment compensation, child support, and alimony, as well as information on the employment of each CU member age 14 and over was also collected.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2010: Diary Survey Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 32482

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Codename: CES10D

Year: 2010

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides a continuous and comprehensive flow of data on the buying habits of American consumers including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. These data are used widely in economic research and analysis, and in support of revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The CE program is comprised of two separate components (each with its own survey questionnaire and independent sample), the Diary Survey and the quarterly Interview Survey (ICPSR 32483). This data collection contains the Diary Survey data, which was designed to obtain data on frequently purchased smaller items, including food and beverages, both at home and in food establishments, gasoline, housekeeping supplies, tobacco, nonprescription drugs, and personal care products and services. Each consumer unit (CU) recorded its expenditures in a diary for two consecutive 1-week periods. Although the diary was designed to collect information on expenditures that could not be easily recalled over time, respondents were asked to report all expenses (except overnight travel) that the CU incurred during the survey week. The microdata in this collection are available as SAS, STATA, SPSS data sets or ASCII text and comma-delimited files. The 2010 Diary release contains five sets of data files (FMLY, MEMB, EXPN, DTAB, DTID) and three processing files. The FMLY, MEMB, EXPN, DTAB, and DTID files are organized by the quarter of the calendar year in which the data were collected. There are four quarterly datasets for each of these files. The FMLY files contain CU characteristics, income, and summary level expenditures; the MEMB files contain member characteristics and income data; the EXPN files contain detailed weekly expenditures at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level; the DTAB files contains the CU's reported annual income values or the mean of the five imputed income values in the multiple imputation method; and the DTID files contain the five imputed income values. The summary level expenditure and income information on the FMLY files permits the data user to link consumer spending, by general expenditure category, and household characteristics and demographics on one set of files. The three processing files enhance computer processing and tabulation of data, and provide descriptive information on item codes. The three processing files are: (1) an aggregation scheme file used in the published consumer expenditure tables (DSTUB), (2) a UCC file that contains UCCs and their abbreviated titles, identifying the expenditure, income, or demographic item represented by each UCC, and (3) a sample program file that contains the computer program used in Section VII.A. SAMPLE PROGRAM of the Diary User Guide. The processing files are further explained in Section III.E.5. PROCESSING FILES of the same User Guide documentation. There is also a second user guide, "User's Guide to Income Imputation in the CE", which includes information on how to appropriately use the imputed income data. Demographic and family characteristics data include age, sex, race, marital status, and CU relationships for each CU member. Income information, such as wage, salary, unemployment compensation, child support, and alimony, as well as information on the employment of each CU member age 14 and over was also collected.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2010: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 32483

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Codename: CES10I

Year:  2010

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides a continuous and comprehensive flow of data on the buying habits of American consumers including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. These data are used widely in economic research and analysis, and in support of revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The CE program is comprised of two separate components (each with its own questionnaire and independent sample), the quarterly Interview Survey and the Diary Survey (ICPSR 32482). This data collection contains the quarterly Interview Survey data, which was designed to collect data on major items of expense which respondents could be expected to recall for 3 months or longer. These included relatively large expenditures, such as those for property, automobiles, and major durable goods, and those that occurred on a regular basis, such as rent or utilities. The Interview Survey does not collect data on expenses for housekeeping supplies, personal care products, and nonprescription drugs, which contribute about 5 to 15 percent of total expenditures. The microdata in this collection are available as SAS, STATA, SPSS data sets or ASCII text and comma-delimited files. The 2010 Interview Survey release contains seven groups of Interview data files (FMLY, MEMB, MTAB, ITAB, ITAB_IMPUTE, FPAR, and MCHI), 50 EXPN files, and processing files. The FMLY, MEMB, MTAB, ITAB, and ITAB_IMPUTE files are organized by the calendar quarter of the year in which the data were collected. There are five quarterly data sets for each of these files, running from the first quarter of 2010 through the first quarter of 2011. The FMLY file contains consumer unit (CU) characteristics, income, and summary level expenditures; the MEMB file contains member characteristics and income data; the MTAB file contains expenditures organized on a monthly basis at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level; the ITAB file contains income data converted to a monthly time frame and assigned to UCCs; and the ITAB_IMPUTE file contains the five imputation variants of the income data converted to a monthly time frame and assigned to UCCs. The FPAR and MCHI datasets are grouped as 2-year datasets (2009 and 2010), plus the first quarter of the 2011. The FPAR file contains CU level data about the Interview survey, including paradata collected about the interview within the interview collection instrument (CAPI). This data includes information on the amount of time required to collect each interview and interview section, as well as other interviewer entered information about the resulting survey. The MCHI file contains data about each interview contact attempt, including reasons for refusal and times of contact. Both FPAR and MCHI files contain five quarters of data. Each of the 50 EXPN files contains five quarters of data. The EXPN files contain data directly derived from their respective questionnaire sections. The processing files enhance computer processing and tabulation of data, and provide descriptive information on item codes. The processing files are: (1) aggregation scheme files used in the published consumer expenditure survey interview tables and integrated tables (ISTUB and INTSTUB), (2) a UCC file that contains UCCs and their abbreviated titles, identifying the expenditure, income, or demographic item represented by each UCC, (3) a vehicle make file (CAPIVEHI), and (4) files containing sample programs. The processing files are further explained in the Interview User Guide, Section III.F.6. PROCESSING FILES. There is also a second user guide, "User's Guide to Income Imputation in the CE", which includes information on how to appropriately use the imputed income data. Demographic and family characteristics data include age, sex, race, marital status, and CU relationships for each CU member. Income information, such as wage, salary, unemployment compensation, child support, and alimony, as well as information on the employment of each CU member age 14 and over was also collected.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2011: Diary Survey Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 34442

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Codename: CES11D

Year:  2011

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides a continuous and comprehensive flow of data on the buying habits of American consumers including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. These data are used widely in economic research and analysis, and in support of revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The CE program is comprised of two separate components (each with its own survey questionnaire and independent sample), the Diary Survey and the quarterly Interview Survey (ICPSR 34441). This data collection contains the Diary Survey data, which was designed to obtain data on frequently purchased smaller items, including food and beverages (both at home and in food establishments), gasoline, housekeeping supplies, tobacco, nonprescription drugs, and personal care products and services. Each consumer unit (CU) recorded its expenditures in a diary for two consecutive 1-week periods. Although the diary was designed to collect information on expenditures that could not be easily recalled over time, respondents were asked to report all expenses (except overnight travel) that the CU incurred during the survey week. The microdata in this collection are available as SAS, SPSS, and STATA datasets or ASCII comma-delimited files. The 2011 Diary release contains five sets of data files (FMLY, MEMB, EXPN, DTBD, DTID) and three processing files. The FMLY, MEMB, EXPN, DTBD, and DTID files are organized by the quarter of the calendar year in which the data were collected. There are four quarterly datasets for each of these files. The FMLY files contain CU characteristics, income, and summary level expenditures; the MEMB files contain member characteristics and income data; the EXPN files contain detailed weekly expenditures at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level; the DTBD files contains the CU's reported annual income values or the mean of the five imputed income values in the multiple imputation method; and the DTID files contain the five imputed income values. Please note that the summary level expenditure and income information on the FMLY files permits the data user to link consumer spending, by general expenditure category, and household characteristics and demographics on one set of files. The three processing files enhance computer processing and tabulation of data, and provide descriptive information on item codes. The three processing files are: (1) an aggregation scheme file used in the published consumer expenditure tables (DSTUB), (2) a UCC file that contains UCCs and their abbreviated titles, identifying the expenditure, income, or demographic item represented by each UCC, and (3) a sample program file that contains the computer program used in Section VII. "MICRODATA VERIFICATION AND ESTIMATION METHODOLOGY" of the Diary User Guide. The processing files are further explained in Section III.F.6. "PROCESSING FILES" of the same User Guide documentation. There is also a second user guide, User's Guide to Income Imputation in the CE, which includes information on how to appropriately use the imputed income data. Demographic and family characteristics data include age, sex, race, marital status, and CU relationships for each CU member. Income information, such as wage, salary, unemployment compensation, child support, and alimony, as well as information on the employment of each CU member age 14 and over was also collected.

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Title: Consumer Expenditure Survey, 2011: Interview Survey and Detailed Expenditure Files

Source: United States Department of Labor. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Owner: ICPSR 34441

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Codename: CES11I

Year:  2011

Status: A

Description: The Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE) program provides a continuous and comprehensive flow of data on the buying habits of American consumers including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. These data are used widely in economic research and analysis, and in support of revisions of the Consumer Price Index. The CE program is comprised of two separate components (each with its own questionnaire and independent sample), the quarterly Interview Survey and the Diary Survey (ICPSR 34442). This data collection contains the quarterly Interview Survey data, which was designed to collect data on major items of expense which respondents could be expected to recall for 3 months or longer. These included relatively large expenditures, such as those for property, automobiles, and major durable goods, and those that occurred on a regular basis, such as rent or utilities. The Interview Survey does not collect data on expenses for housekeeping supplies, personal care products, and nonprescription drugs, which contribute about 5 to 15 percent of total expenditures. The microdata in this collection are available as SAS, SPSS, and STATA datasets or ASCII comma-delimited files. The 2011 Interview Survey release contains seven groups of Interview data files (FMLY, MEMB, MTBI, ITBI, ITII, FPAR, and MCHI), 50 EXPN files, and processing files. The FMLY, MEMB, MTBI, ITBI, and ITII files are organized by the calendar quarter of the year in which the data were collected. There are five quarterly datasets for each of these files, running from the first quarter of 2011 through the first quarter of 2012. The FMLY file contains consumer unit (CU) characteristics, income, and summary level expenditures; the MEMB file contains member characteristics and income data; the MTBI file contains expenditures organized on a monthly basis at the Universal Classification Code (UCC) level; the ITBI file contains income data converted to a monthly time frame and assigned to UCCs; and the ITII file contains the five imputation variants of the income data converted to a monthly time frame and assigned to UCCs. The FPAR and MCHI datasets are grouped as 2-year datasets (2010 and 2011), plus the first quarter of the 2012 and contain paradata about the Interview survey. The FPAR file contains CU level data about the Interview survey, including timing and record use. The MCHI file contains data about each interview contact attempt, including reasons for refusal and times of contact. Both FPAR and MCHI files contain five quarters of data. The EXPN files contain expenditure data and ancillary descriptive information, often not available on the FMLY or MTBI files, in a format similar to the Interview questionnaire. In addition to the extra information available on the EXPN files, users can identify distinct spending categories easily and reduce processing time due to the organization of the files by type of expenditure. Each of the 50 EXPN files contains five quarters of data, directly derived from their respective questionnaire sections. The processing files enhance computer processing and tabulation of data, and provide descriptive information on item codes. The processing files are: (1) aggregation scheme files used in the published consumer expenditure survey interview tables and integrated tables (ISTUB and INTSTUB), (2) a UCC file that contains UCCs and their abbreviated titles, identifying the expenditure, income, or demographic item represented by each UCC, (3) a vehicle make file (CAPIVEHI), and (4) files containing sample programs. The processing files are further explained in the Interview User Guide, Section III.G.8. "PROCESSING FILES." There is also a second user guide, User's Guide to Income Imputation in the CE, which includes information on how to appropriately use the imputed income data. Demographic and family characteristics data include age, sex, race, marital status, and CU relationships for each CU member. Income information, such as wage, salary, unemployment compensation, child support, and alimony, as well as information on the employment of each CU member age 14 and over was also collected.

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Title: Content Analysis of Asian Newspapers: 1962, 1966, 1970, 1972

Source: Nabuo Jo, Nabuo Sasaki, Sasumu Yamakage, and Hiroaki Yoshii

Owner: ICPSR 7489

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Codename: ASIAN

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: The data consist of content analysis of 3,674 news items taken from newspapers of four Asian countries published during the last three months of 1962, 1966, 1970, and 1972. Fourteen variables describe domestic events and foreign interactions involving Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, and Singapore. General categories of data are domestic events in Japan; relations between Japan and the other three countries; relations between Japan and the rest of the world; domestic events in Thailand, Indonesia, and Singapore; their relations among themselves, and their relations with the rest of the world. Further information were collected during 1970 concerning the relationship between each of the three nations (Thailand, Indonesia, and Singapore) and the following nations: U.S., U.K., Australia, West Germany, and the Netherlands. Class II

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Title: Contentious Gatherings in Britain, 1758-1834

Source: Horn, Nancy, and Charles Tilly

Owner: ICPSR 8872

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Codename: CGB1758-1834

Year: 1758-1834

Status:  

Description: This study records discontinuous, concerted, contentious forms of collective action occurring in the London region from 1758 to 1820 and in Britain as a whole from 1828 to 1834. These contentious gatherings are defined as occasions on which at least ten or more persons assembled in a publicly-accessible place and either by word or deed made claims that would, if realized, affect the interests of some person or group outside their own number. In the world of eighteenth and nineteenth century Britain such gatherings would include almost every event that an observer or historian would label disturbance, disorder, riot, or protest in addition to the numerous meetings, rallies, marches, processions, celebrations, and other sanctioned assemblies during which people made claims. One of the aims of the principal investigators was to study the structure of debate and political action among citizens in a major Western state during a period of transition to the more formal methods of modern popular collective action such as voting, petitioning, and participation in special-interest associations. Date added: 01-17-2003.

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Title: Cooperative Congressional Election Study, 2006

Source: Ansolabehere, Stephen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Owner: ICPSR 30141

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Codename: CCES06

Year: 2006

Status: A

Description: The Cooperative Congressional Election Study (CCES) focused on the study of how Americans view Congress and hold their representatives accountable during elections. The very large sample for this survey provided the opportunity to study legislative constituencies -- states and congressional districts -- as well as voters within those constituencies, to study very rare or low frequency events or very small populations, and to measure with fairly high accuracy interactions. Respondents of this survey were asked whether they approved of the way George W. Bush was handling his job as president, what they thought was the most important problem facing the country, whether they were satisfied with the way things were going in the country, and their opinions of the condition of the economy in their communities, in their state, and in the United States. Respondents were also asked whether they approved of the way their governor, their United States Senators, and their United States House Representatives were handling their jobs. Information was collected on whether respondents thought their neighborhoods were politically active, whether they were mostly Democrat or Republican, whether the United States was more Democratic or Republican, and whether they were interested in politics and current affairs. Information was collected on which candidate respondents planned on voting for in the races for governor, for United States Senate, and for United States House of Representatives, and which party they wanted to see control the United States Congress. Opinions were solicited on "partial-birth abortion", federal government stem cell research funding, United States troop withdrawal from Iraq, illegal immigration, increasing the minimum wage, cutting taxes on capital gains, a trade agreement that reduces barriers between the United States and Central America, and whether respondents thought their United States Senators voted for or against these issues. Respondents were queried about their voting experience on November 7, 2006, including whether they voted and how they voted, whether they were asked to show identification, how long they had to wait in line, whether there was a problem with their registration, who they voted for, and whether they voted for the Republican or Democratic candidate for various offices on the ballot including Secretary of State and Attorney General. Information was collected on whether respondents were part of any organizations, donated money to any political candidates or political party committees, tried to persuade someone to vote or how to vote, whether they were contacted by a candidate or political party organization to get them to vote, and who they thought would have the most seats after the newly elected United States House of Representatives and the Senate were sworn in. Other topics included same-sex marriage, Social Security, environmental protection, and Affirmative Action. Demographic information collected included race, religious preference, religious attendance, political viewpoints, employment status, home ownership status, household income, political party affiliation, and voter registration status.

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Title: Correlates of Crime: A Study of 52 Nations, 1960-1984

Source: Richard R. Bennett

Owner: ICPSR 9258

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Codename: COC6084

Year:  

Status: A

Description: This collection contains data on crime and on relevant social, economic, and political measures hypothesized to relate to crime for 52 nations over a 25-year period. These time series data are divided into five substantive areas: offense, offender, and national,social, political, and economic data. Nations included in the collection were drawn from seven major regions of the world. Class IV

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Title: Correlates Of War Project: International And Civil War Data, 1816-1992

Source: Singer, J. David, and Melvin Small

Owner: ICPSR 9905

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Codename: COWP

Year:  

Status:  A

Description: This data collection describes international and civil wars for the years 1816-1992. Part 1, the International Wars file, describes the experience of each interstate member in each war. The unit of analysis is the participant in a particular conflict. When and where each interstate member fought is coded, along with battle and total deaths, pre-war population and armed forces, and whether the member in question initiated the conflict. Each war is characterized as interstate, colonial, or imperial, and major power status and/or central system membership of the warring parties is noted. Part 2, the Civil Wars file, describes when and where fighting took place, whether the war was fought within the boundaries of a major power or central system member, whether there was outside intervention and, if so, whether the intervening state was a major power, on what side they intervened, who won the war, number of battle deaths, total population, and total number of pre-war armed forces.

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Title: Correlates of War Project: International and Civil War Data, 1816-1992

Source: Singer, J. David, and Melvin Small.

Owner: ICPSR 9905

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Codename: COWP

Year: 1816-1992

Status:  

Description: This data collection describes international and civil wars for the years 1816-1992. Part 1, the International Wars file, describes the experience of each interstate member in each war. The unit of analysis is the participant in a particular conflict. When and where each interstate member fought is coded, along with battle and total deaths, pre-war population and armed forces, and whether the member in question initiated the conflict. Each war is characterized as interstate, colonial, or imperial, and major power status and/or central system membership of the warring parties is noted. Part 2, the Civil Wars file, describes when and where fighting took place, whether the war was fought within the boundaries of a major power or central system member, whether there was outside intervention and, if so, whether the intervening state was a major power, on what side they intervened, who won the war, number of battle deaths, total population, and total number of pre-war armed forces.;

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Title: Correlates of War Project: International and Civil War Data, 1816-1992

Source: Singer, J. David, and Melvin Small.

Owner: ICPSR 9905

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Codename: cwp

Year: 1816-1992

Status: A

Description: This data collection describes international and civil wars for the years 1816-1992. Part 1, the International Wars file, describes the experience of each interstate member in each war. The unit of analysis is the participant in a particular conflict. When and where each interstate member fought is coded, along with battle and total deaths, pre-war population and armed forces, and whether the member in question initiated the conflict. Each war is characterized as interstate, colonial, or imperial, and major power status and/or central system membership of the warring parties is noted. Part 2, the Civil Wars file, describes when and where fighting took place, whether the war was fought within the boundaries of a major power or central system member, whether there was outside intervention and, if so, whether the intervening state was a major power, on what side they intervened, who won the war, number of battle deaths, total population, and total number of pre-war armed forces. Date added: 2/20/2002.

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Title: Correlates of War Project: Militarized Interstate Dispute (MID) Data, 1816-2001

Source: Diehl, Paul, University of Illinois

Owner: ICPSR 24386

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Codename: MID2001

Year: 1816-2001

Status: A

Description:  The Militarized Interstate Dispute (MID) (v3.10) data, compiled by the Correlates of War Project, provides information about conflicts in which one or more states threaten, display, or use force against one or more other states between 1816 and 2001. Five datasets are included with this collection. The first dataset comprises essential attributes of each militarized interstate dispute from January 1, 1816, through December 31, 2001, while the second dataset includes participants in each of these disputes. The third dataset comprises essential elements of each militarized interstate incident from January 1, 1993, through December 31, 2001, including incidents that belong to disputes that began in 1992 and continued into 1993, while the fourth dataset includes participants in each of these incidents. The fifth dataset contains dyadic militarized interstate disputes, of which each dyadic MID has exactly two states involved, on opposite sides of the MID. Generated from the incident-level data, these data are from the years 1993 through 2001, and additionally are provided for MIDs that were ongoing as of December 31, 1992.

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Title: Cost of Living of Industrial Workers in the United States and Europe, 1888-1890

Source: United States Department of Labor.

Owner: ICPSR 7711

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Codename: cliwuse1888-1890

Year: 1888-1890

Status: A

Description: These data were gathered in order to determine the cost of living as well as the cost of production in selected industries in the United States and several Western European countries. The study is comprised of nine industries (cotton and woolen textiles, glass, pig iron, bar iron, steel, bituminous coal, coke, and iron ore) and contains family-level information on the household composition, income and expenditures of workers in these industries. Additional topics covered include sources of income, ages and sexes of children, detailed occupation of the household head, detailed expenditures for food as well as nonfood items, and characteristics of the family's dwelling units. Added 4/20/05.

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Title: Cost of Providing Transportation and In-home Services to the Elderly, 1982-1983

Source: Institute for Economic and Social Measurements, Inc.

Owner: ICPSR 8309

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Codename: cptise8283

Year: 1982-1983

Status: A

Description: With support from the Department of Health and Human Services' Administration on Aging under grant No. 90-A-1279, this study was undertaken to examine the costs of providing transportation and in-home services to the elderly. The study was divided into two distinct parts, transportation services provided to the elderly and in-home services provided to the elderly. Both parts of the study examined the costs of administrative, professional and clerical staff. Variables include wages paid, number of full vs. part-time staff and fringe benefits, as well as office expenses such as the cost of office machines, equipment, supplies, and furniture. Insurance and taxes paid were also investigated, as were accounting, advertising and legal counsel costs. The transportation services section of the study classified agencies providing the services studied by type: private for profit, private non-profit, public, and other. This portion of the study also determined vehicle descriptions, revenue by source, and hours that service was provided. The in-home services section of the study also classifies agencies providing these services by type: government based public health, government based social services, private non-profit, and private for profit. Several types of services offered were examined, such as nursing care, therapy, personal care, housekeeping, physician visits, nutrition and social service counseling, and companionship. This collection is stored as one physical file containing 120 data records, each data record has a logical record length of 3,600 characters. The transportation services portion includes approximately 180 variables, while the in-home services portion contains approximately 280 variables.;

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Title: Costs and Revenues of US Daily Newspapers, 1927 and 1930, Inland Daily Press Association

Source: Gentzkow, Matthew, University of Chicago, and National Bureau of Economic Research;

Owner: ICPSR 35160

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Codename: CRDN1927

Year: 1927 and 1930

Status: A

Description: The focus of this data collection was the costs and revenues of United States daily newspapers in 1927 and 1930. Detailed cost and revenues for 94 and 104 newspapers respectively, were obtained from tables in annual reports. Costs include mechanical, delivery and maintenance, administrative and editorial, paper and ink, costs. Revenues include local, foreign, classified, and legals and reader advertising. Data is from a non-random sample and newspaper names are unavailable.

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Title: Country Memberships in Selected Intergovernmental Organizations and Accession to Selected Regional and Global Treaty Regimes: Global, Country-Year Format, 1955-2010

Source: Ulfelder, Jay, Science Applications International Corporation

Owner: ICPSR 30541

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Codename: CM5510

Year: 1955-2010

Status: A

Description: A listing of organizational memberships by country and year between 1955 and 2010.

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Title: County and City Data Book [United States] Consolidated File: City Data, 1944-1977

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 7735

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Codename: CCDB4477c

Year: 1944-1977

Status: A

Description: This study is a compendium of data for all cities in the United States with populations greater than 25,000 in the period 1944-1977. The data provide diverse information ranging from city government activities to population estimates and characteristics to housing unit descriptors. Included is information on city government revenues, property taxes, capital outlay, and debts, and expenditures on education, highways, public welfare, health and hospitals, and police, as well as information on births, deaths, schooling, labor force, employment, family income, family characteristics, electoral votes, number of registered voters, and housing characteristics. Additional variables provide information on manufacturing, retail and wholesale trade, banking, mineral industries, farm population, agriculture, crime, and weather. See also the related data collection, COUNTY AND CITY DATA BOOK [UNITED STATES] CONSOLIDATED FILE: COUNTY DATA, 1947-1977 (ICPSR 7736).

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Title: County and City Data Book [United States] Consolidated File: County Data, 1947-1977

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner: ICPSR 7736

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Codename: ccdb77

Year: 1947-1977

Status: A

Description: This study is a compendium of data for all counties in the United States in the period 1944-1977. The data provide diverse information ranging from local government activities to population estimates and characteristics to housing unit descriptors. Included is information on local government revenues, property taxes, capital outlay, and debts, and expenditures on education, highways, public welfare, health and hospitals, and police, as well as information on births, deaths, schooling, labor force, employment, family income, family characteristics, electoral votes, and housing characteristics. Additional variables provide information on manufacturing, retail and wholesale trade, banking, mineral industries, farm population, agriculture, crime, and weather. See also the related data collection, COUNTY AND CITY DATA BOOK [UNITED STATES] CONSOLIDATED FILE: CITY DATA, 1944-1977 (ICPSR 7735).

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Title: County and City Data Book [United States], 1983

Source: United States Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Census

Owner:&nb